Leg 3

Brad, on deck: "Melbourne here we come. Slowly." Shot of them slatting in no wind with land in the distance, Nicho on the helm.Slomo of AkzoNobel sailing upwind, close-hauled on port tack. Nicolai, below, talks about the remaining leg for them. Nicho, at the helm: "Learned the same lessons I think I've been taught before: never to be complacent. I don't think we were complacent, but we had one terrible gybe which I'm more responsible for than anyone, and that cost us the leg. And the usual story, that you make that mistake in the middle of nowhere, and you can pay for it for a long time. So that's what we did this leg." Martine, on deck: "What I've learned on this spedific leg? Probably a lot of patience. And try to find joy, and happiness, in little things every day... Sometimes a bird, or whale-watching, has made my day, a funny joke; anything. Always try to find the thing that makes you happy." Brad sleeping on the foredeck in bare feet. Nicolai, below: "I think this leg's been quite a challenge for many of us. Not so much a normal Volvo leg, physically a challenge, but more mentally and team-wise, it's been a tough one. But it's also been one that we probably needed to have to keep getting better and better, and hopefully learn from it, all of us, and become a stronger team. And I think we are handling quite well the headwinds we have, no issues within the team, it's all head down and keep working whatever we find ourself in and that's quite positive and quite good." Slomo of someone's hands on the wheel.GoPro shot from the masthead. Shot of the instruments on the mast. Looks like they're reaching on port tack in about 10 knots of wind. Nicolai grinds. Clew of the MH0 in the background. Nicolai: explains the strategic situation, how they have to sail upwind. Nicho, on the helm: "Boredom has set in... Question of the watch is how much Nutella gets produced in the world in a year." He's added another question as to annual Vegemite production. Martine and Nicolai discuss Nutella production. Nicolai: "It's been a relatively short leg, but it feels like a long one." Hard because they haven't been near other boats. Nicho says they've learned some things about the boat. Nicolai: Looking forward to land and rest, but mostly to getting a reset to get back with the fleet. Shot of the mainsail looking up.Emily steers while wearing reindeer antlers. Beow, brad listens through earbuds as he inventories gear (?) in the bow (?). An inflatable shark head watches him. Brad talks to James. "Yeah, I'm just listening to Jingle Bells, Christmas carols, that sort of thing. Get myself in the festive mood." In the galley area, Justin is going through a bag of something while Emily distributes candies, including candycanes her mum brought over. She talks about how with freezedried food it's hard to do much in terms of Christmas dinner, but she's making sure everyone has their favorite. "Try to keep a happy boat." Justin: "I've got beef stroganof. Probbly my least-favorite meal on the boat. I was hoping for roast lamb, mashed potatoes." We see the pouches next to the galley with candycanes in each. Brad: "Chirsmas day has consisted of the same things we've been doing for the last 3 weeks. Four hours on, four hours off." He explains he's been doing some restocking of spares, making sure he knows what they've got going into the next leg. On deck, an animated Santa toy has been lashed to the instruments on the mast. He sings a rock & roll Christmas song. On the bow in the background, Martine and Brad (I think) are shifting t eh stack forward for lighter wind.MAPFRE, having finished the leg first, motors into Melbourne in the dark. Sophie, visibly tired (for her; meaning she's just barely not at 100% enthusiasm) talks about how amazing it feels to have won. "It's awesome, we've got a good lead on the whole fleet now, shows we're a pretty strong team. Especially in all conditions." Talks about how the leg was physically hard, pushing to their limits. Shows they're a solid team, strong, never going to give up. "I was just chatting wiht Louis now on the bow, and if we can handle that kind of situation we can pretty much handle anything out there. So anything after this is going to seem easier." Talks about how it's just a pitstop in Melbourne, they have a few more days than some other teams. Boat's in good shape; could go sailing tomorrow. So they're good.Ben, on the aft pedestal, takes a washing machine wave in the face in slomo. He turns to the camera and says "Merry Christmas."Below, Bouwe discusses the latest sched. Happy because even though they [Vestas, presumably] are still ahead of them, they've closed the range a lot. So maybe still a chance to catch them. He explains the effect of the counter-clockwise windshift in favoring the boat on the left (Dongfeng).Pascal reads the latest sched over the PA system. He talks with Martin in French. He talks with Charles. Charles: "Not so bad news. Vestas has not been so fast in reaching. We are leading again with 7 miles. In a good position... We can hope to keep this distance or increase it as of the entrance to Melbourne Bay." Talks about what happened yesterday, thinking it was their last gybe and then having the keel problem. "We don't know if we will be able to cant the keel to max cant on port."Simon, at the nav station, looks at routing software and a sched (I think?). He talks about hopefully making gains, or at least holding even. "I"m just hoping we gained, or at least held them. Were getting lifted now, so it'd be nice for them to get lifted as well." He looks at the sched. "One longer, two higher." Charlie looks over his shoulder. They discuss the update. Charlie: "And relative to the last sched they must have been fucking 10 higher." Charlie: "C'mon. Difference in distance to finish 2 miles?" SiFi: "Good for the fans at home." They talk about getting lifted compared to the model; when to gybe. Charlie: "Nice to know we're a bit longer, a little faster... We'll run out of pressure before them. It's nice to be so close to Dongfeng, but that's a little inflated... Still fighting to the end, especially with double points." SiFi explains that they were talking about Brunel. "Next 24 hours is all about keeping the yellow boat behind us, and catching the red one."Bouwe comes out of the cabin into the cockpit wearing a Santa Claus costume. He's holding a sack and banging on a teapot. Carlo watches from the shrounds. Santa: "Ho! Ho! Ho! Merry Christmas!" Santa gives a present (a card?) to Capey. Capey: "It doesn't look like I can eat this." Peter watches from the helm. Peter gets a (poorly wrapped) present. Abby gets a present (hers actually looks pretty nice). Santa gives Annie one present, then swaps out a different one and gives hers to Alberto. Louis, poking his head up from below, gets a "baby" one. Santa walks to the bow, then back. Kyle emerges from the cabin rubbing his eyes. Louis puts on reindeer+Santa hat sunglasses. (Assuming that was his present?) Santa passes out the final gifts: Cookies. "Sharing, sharing..." Santa removes his beard to enjoy a cookie. Carlo talks to Ugo: "You really miss out on the special days doing this race. So it's nice to be able to celebrate Christmas with Santa on the boat." Below, at the nav station, Santa/Bouwe types at the computer.Crew in cockpit. Nav station below, with instrument readout. Jules explains that they're appraoching the finish area. Talks about the high pressure they have to go through to get to the finish. So they're a few days out from Melbourne still. Simeon putting on (off?) his gear. Talks about pleasant conditions. "Everyone's looking forward to finishing the leg and move on." Frustration. Shot of Nicolai eating. Jules looking glum at nav station; he gets up and leaves.We see the cabin. Kevin is looking down in the hull on the port side of the galley; Fabien and Pascal watch him. Kevin says something in French. Shots of 6 inches of water sloshing around on the port side of the cabin, just in front of the hatch. Fabien explains something to Martin in French; I'm picking up "boat" and "keel". Kevin: "We have a problem with the keel. I don't know exactly why. At this time we want to do a fitting, to change the sail. And Pascal [something] to tell that we had plenty of water and oil in the boat... I hope it is not a problem with the keel ram attached to the boat." Shot of them pumping water out; shot of the port keel ram with water flooding in around its forward end. Jack explains that the port keel ram, which pushes the keel from side to side, where it attaches to the boat the hull fitting has cracked. So a lot of water came into the boat, and they've lost the oil from the ram system. Have turned off the port ram and put oil back into the starboard ram. On deck, Black explains. Below, Kevin operates a hand-held drill pump (adding oil to starboard ram?). He explains that the system is designed to work with only one ram. Below, Charles and Kevin talk in French, and use the starboard ram to operate the keel. Charles, at nav station, explains that they've fixed it, but have lost 10-15 miles and are now close to Vestas and Brunel. He has looked at the routing, and it is helping the fleet catch up. He's hoping they don't lose second place. "We deserve second place."Charles, at the nav station, looking bummed as he looks at routing software. He says it isn't good news; Vestas has passed them and they have not that much wind. (Though looking at the tracker now, I'm not sure Vestas is actually going to get ahead of them.) But they have to gybe, while Dongfeng can go straight to the mark. So he thinks Dongfeng can stay ahead. Not fair, because they are so far apart they have to do different routings, and the routing was poor for them and better for Vestas. Also the keel problem has cost them some key miles; he hopes that isn't the difference between second and third place.Crash cam, stern cam. We see TTToP surfing down a big wave on port gybe. They get too low, bury the bow, pop the rudders out, and the boat gybes accidentally to starboard. They immediately grind in the main (good; helped to keep the rig in), get the keel across (presumably), then tack around onto port again. Liz, below, explains what happened. Bleddyn describes what happened. Frederico says that was his first time doing that in a Volvo 65 (which gets a laugh). He describes what it was like down below. Dee says it was inevitable, probably, but things got sorted out. "A few wide eyes."Vestas sails fast on starboard gybe with a reefed main (I think?). Slomo washing machine shot from behind the helm. TJ, below, is eating. On screen title: Tom Johnson presents / A Christmas Story. Tom: "Hello Sam, said TJ. There once was a boy trying to make it home for Christmas." Stacey, eating below, talks about how they're 2 days away from Christmas. Stacey explains that she's not from that part of Australia, but a family is coming to see her. TJ talks about the big, cold low-pressure system that prevented them from gybing to get north. Shot on deck shows helmsman NOT standing on the helm platform, but instead on a stacked sail. Below, Sam asks Stacey, "Motivation to go faster?" Stacey: "Yeah. We've been down in the cold too long, and we're pretty keen to get out of there... Any minute now it's gonna be balmy and warm." Below, Tony eats, and explains that real Christmas for him is getting away with the family for a summer holiday. Stacey jokes that this isn't warm. Tony exhales so you can see his breath. TJ keeps telling his Christmas story, trying to get there to see his family on Christmas. Father and mother; his sister he hasn't seen for 3 years. And his niece Lucille that he's never even met. Talks about that being a hard thing about his job: Always moving. Charlie talks with Simon (off camera) about how they should do stealth mode now, becaue once MAPFRE is within 200 miles of the finish it will end. TJ talks about stealth mode. Charlie talks about how they've decided when to gybe, strategic consideration with Brunel. TJ: "TJ's storytelling voice... You'll find out how the story ends in a couple of days. Hopefully it's a happy story." Tony on the helm. TJ: "He's bringing his sled. A big sled, Vestas Wind."Below, Xabi talks about how they kept pushing hard. On deck, Xabi and Louis grnd on the pedestal. Xabi is REALLY pushing it; that's a lead-by-example leader there, methinks. Sophie grinding the starboard secondary winch. That's where that lined-face still photo of her that was making the rounds on SA came from, I think. Blair, below, recaps the last 36 hours, different winds, getting a 30-40 mile lead on Dongfeng. Them going into stealth mode, which made them have to push the boat the whole time. It was fun. 30 knots, massive waves. Trying not to break the boat. Stern cam / crash cam of the two grinders (Louis and Blair) being blown off the aft pedestal. Xabi, below, talks in Spanish. Washing machine shots. Támara grinding a pit winch. Xabi, below, recaps in English: Conditions tough for the past week. Last night very squally. A few broaches. 38-40 knots. "I think we did very well. We kept the boat in one piece, and everyone safe."Annie is in her foulie bottoms below. She's movnig a little gingerly? Puts on her foulie top. "I was trying not to go up when it's windy, but it's always windy. I can't stay below anymore. We'll see what Bouwe says when I get on deck. At the moment he won't let me grind, so not very useful. But we'll see." She finishes gearing up, goes on deck. Right into the washing machine. Later (how much later?) she's back below. Talks about how it's cold and wet, so "not the perfect conditions for recovery." But she's getting there, she says. Below, Bouwe talks about her spirit and drive; good to see she's getting better.At the nav station, Capey talks about how they've gybed and are heading north. "Exactly one Hobart Race away from being in Melbourne." Bouwe, below, talks about Vestas and how they have a shot at third. Vestas went into stealth mode this morning. Ridge of high pressure to cross; still tricky. Brunel might go into stealth mode in the high pressure, he says. Stern cam / crash cam view of Brunel sailing fast with full main on port gybe. Then, handheld shot from behind helm of Brunel on starboard gybe. Washing machine. Sunset off stern. Helmsman (can't tell who) gives a thumbs up. Slomo shots of washing machine.Slomo shots of the crew working in the cockpit. Washing machine. Nicho comes below, takes his gear off, washes his face in the galley. Nicho: "You see when you take certain medication, 'Don't operate this vehicle when tired and drowsy'? Well, everyone's operating this vehicle tired and drowsy." Talks about getting rest, food, makes for better decisions. Martine comes below, takes off her gear. "For me sleep and food go side by side. The less I sleep the more I have to eat to have energy." Martine eats. Nicolai talks below about the balance between sleeping and eating. Brad: People sacrifice a lot to get a couple of minutes extra sleep. People don't brush their teeth to get a couple more minutes of sleep. Don't want to name names." Martine gets in her bunk. Nico, talks about the upcoming stronger conditions. "Plenty of sleep. Just look at me." He grins.Crash cam / stern cam footage as MAPFRE surfs on port gybe with reefed main. Louis and Blair (I think? going by bits of name in Louis' case and bits of '77' visible on his back in Blair's case) are on the aft pedestal; a big wave wipes them BOTH off the pedestal.Crash cam / stern cam footage while TTToP surfs in high wind and big seas on starboard gybe. Lucas, on the helm, takes a big enough wave in the face that his PFD inflates. He hands off the helm to someone, then heads forward to go below (presumably to change out his life vest).Wake shot with Dongfeng sailing fast. View forward from stern, double-headed as they sail on port gybe. Washing machine. Below, Jack eats something. He looks a bit shell-shocked. Jack: "It's been a very brutal leg so far. It's very demanding conditions; always fast, always wet... I don't think I've gone on deck without the wet weather gear the whole race. Everything's wet. Inside the boat's horrible. There's water everywhere. There's water in your sleeping bag, there's water in your personal bag. There's water everywhere. It's been a really hard leg to sleep; every time you seem to get in your bunk there's a gybe or a sail change... It's been a hard leg. Everyone's feeling the push at the moment, everyone's tired... We're close to the end, conditions are still hard at the moment, but everyone's focused on getting to Australia in one piece and in the best place we can... First time I've sailed into Australia, so it's kind of a treat. A big Southern Ocean leg done, which was an unknown for me." Talks about how a lot of his family witll be in Melbourne for the finish. Hasn't seen some of them in 6 years, so it will be great to catch up with them. Really looking forward to getting in. Shots of water condensing on things in the cabin, water flowing. Marie asleep. Jack putting Sudocrem on his hands, face. "It might look ridiculous." But explains how the cream helps with little cuts and sores from the gaskets and salt water. Black, below, talks about how it's a long day, and a lot of pressure, lack of sleep. "A bit tired, yes." Shots of the cockpit from the cabin, washing machine.Night time crash cam/stern cam. Brunel is on starboard with lots of spray. It looks like they broach; person [Carlo, it turns out] moves forward from the aft pedestal to free the headsail sheet. Easing headsail; sails flapping. More crew move forward. Grinding the headsail back in. Below, Peter watches the crash cam video on a tablet. Peter: "That's us broaching now." Carlo looks at the video, laughs. Peter: "Yeah. I was, uh, driving last night and probably pushing a little too hard into a squall. Wiped out at about 30, high 20s, quite lucky, because it got up to about 40 later once we got it under control... Generally it happens when the bow gets stuck in a wave at the wrong time, and you can't bear away. Lose the rudders... Done it a fair few times now, so everyone knows pretty well what to do. Not too dangerous for anyone; just a bit risky for the FR0... Have to push the boat hard. Everyone else is pushing the boat hard... Definitely prefer to go that way than the other way." Carlo: "I'm the guy on the aft pedestal, grinding for the main. We start to broach, so I go forward to the pirmary where the FR0 sheet's connected to. I dump 3 or 4 meters of sheet... It's pretty difficult, you can tell by the video that it's not that easy, there's water in your eyes, water everywhere, your orientation is a bit messed up. At the same time you don't wnat to wash off the boat as well, because at the time I wasn't that secure. [Rewatching, I think he was not, in fact, clipped in.] With the heel of the boat as well, it's quite a challenge to actually get there and do the work. But it's nice to see that. I'm actually pretty happy with it... We came out of that pretty well."Spreader cam view as TTToP triple-heads on starboard with J2 and J3. Bow cam view looking aft. Stern cam view of washing machine. Martin (I think) on the helm. Spreader cam looking at the cockpit, mast cam looking at the bow. Slomo of Dee rimming the main from the stern. Washing machine from cabin.Bianca, trimming the mainsheet: "I always wanted to do the Volvo Ocean Race. I never thought it would be possible, but I always worked hard, and I tried to get as many sea miles under my belt and get qualified. Of course, you have to make a lot of sacrifices... but the biggest sacrifice you make by doing the Volvo Ocean Race is leaving your family behind. I'm really lucky in that I have a great support system with my family, and really looking forward to seeing them when I get to Melbourne." Liz, below: "I think if you thought too much about the sacrifices you wouldn't be here." Dee: "I think to do the Volvo Ocean Race is a massive commitment... When you're trying to put it together it's all-encompassing." Bleddyn: "After every leg you realize what you've done, and where you've sailed from and to. But during the leg you're so involved in it you don't think about it until you get downstairs and you look at the chart table." Francesca: "For me it's a dream to be here." She talks about doing two Olympics. Lucas talks about setting his mind on doing it. And long hard miles, and networking, and time in the gym. But he's happy it's paid off.Charlie, below, talks about how they've cleared the ice gate. "We're in an ocean race. Now we have the whole ocean to sail around in." Mark, in the pit, talks about no more gybing. "Well, no more gybing every hour." He trims something in in the pit. The crew shifts the stack from forward aft using the traditional heave chant: "Two, Six!"On the stern, Bianca talks about helming the VO65. "I've had experience helming all sorts of boats. The biggest one I've helmed is about 220 feet. So this is a bit like a dinghy compared to that. You can really feel any wave hitting the side of the boat." She talks about the thrill of sending it down a big wave, needing to have trust in your fellow sailors. "It's just such an amazing feeling, the adrenaline's really rushing in you. I'm pretty sure the whole time I was steering I just had a massive grin from ear to ear. It's awsome." Martin: "It's important for evyerone to have a go. You can't go through the whole Southern Ocean without touching the helm. It was quite good to see Bianca; she did a good job. It was not easy for me to make the decision to let her drive as well. Might be a few more opportunities for her in the future." Below, Elodie says, "It's really important to try to involve everybody... for example, Bianca is working hard to learn to trim the mainsail every time I'm driving, so it's nice to give her the opportunity to drive a little bit too. It's important for the trimmers to understand how it feels when you are driving." Shot of Biana taking the wheel. and steering. Yeah, she's grinning. View from astern as she steers; rainbow on the horizon. She hands off the helm to Lucas, gives a big thumbs-up to the camera, and a fist-bump to Martin on the mainsheet. Cloud with crepuscular rays.Below, Kevin talks about being tired. "With my watch partner Carolijn Brouwer we have been 12 hours on deck - 14, 2 more. Lots of gybes along the ice limit. Now we are getting more pressure, sea state." Now 2 hours of rest before being back on deck, then one very important gybe before heading north for Australia. Carolijn: "I think I have to admit I'm pretty tired now. All the action on deck seems to happen when Kevin and I are off watch. But it's part of the job and you ahve to get it done. It's part of the race." In the Southern Ocean it's harder because of getting dressed and undressed. "When you do that every 2 hours it gets a bit frustrating. In other legs it's much less a problem... There's a lot more layers coming on than otherwise.... Have to push really hard. The guys on MAPFRE have done really well." Fabien talks in French. Black talks about normal life on board. Having to be ready. Eating a lot of food with no rice (?). Pascal talks in French.GoPro head-mount shot of someone emerging from the cabin, slapping the selector button on the side of the forward pedestal. Who is that? Hand on the hatch coaming at 0:05 looks like relatively slender and not too grizzled with age; maybe Támara? It's not Blair, Sophie, or Willy; they're all identifiable in the shot. Oh, he says "Ready". It's Louis. Thanks (again) for accents. We see the gybe from his perspective as he grinds on the starboard side of the middle [sic - he's now on a different pedestal. possibly a different gybe?] pedestal, opposite Willy, as they gybe from starboard to port gybe. We see the gybe again from the perspective of the spreader cam. "Runner made!" We see a gybe (a different gybe; only one person is on the middle pedestal) from the stern cam. It might be that the spreader cam and the stern cam can't both be recorded at the same time, so these were separate gybes. Bow cam shot of the J2 being unfurled. Slomo shot of Willy and someone else on the forward pedestal, grinding. Xabi, below, talks in Spanish. He repeats in English: Last day has been crazy on MAPFRE. Almost 30 gybes along the exclusion zone. This morning, another 10 or 12. "We have to go south; it's a goal... It's pretty hard but it's pretty soft, but finally we're free of gates, and can send it south all day and night, before heading north towards Melbourne."Spreader cam view of AkzoNobel sailing in 10 knots of wind under MH0 and J3 on starboard gybe. Slomo shot of which being trimmed. Below, Nicolai talks about his second Volvo being different than his first one. "Still having issues and battles, and that's part of the race... Not where we want to be right now, and we're in a tough position; we know that. All sailors... are used to being in deep holes, and having to dig their ways out." Slomo closeup of Nicolai. He talks about how you always have to put a huge amount of effort in just to be in the race, to compete. "Of course it's a bit painful that you don't get the result you aim for, but you gotta keep your head down and keep putting in the effort, because it will change eventually... You can never regret putting in the effort, no matter how it turns out. That's just the way you do it. You'd rather aim high and fail rather than aim low and hit." Slomo shots of him. Slomo shot of the helm, the horizon.Slomo shots of Minke whales surfacing close to their port quarter. Martine describes it. "First time we saw it was literally less than 5 meters away."Pascal, at the nav station, puts on a headset. He announces something we hear booming through a PA system. "20 minutes before the gybe. 20 minutes." Jack, waking up in his bunk. Carolijn and Black getting dressed. Marie getting dressed. Pascal over the PA: "Three minutes." Crew goes on deck, perfoms the gybe. Below, we see Marie climbing back into her bunk. Pascal, over the PA: "Okay; in about 20 minutes [?] another gybe." Time lapse shot of repeated gybes with short intervals between them.Drone shot of Scallywag sailing on starboard under MH0 in about 10 knots of wind. Shot from on deck as a whale (Minke whale, maybe?) surfaces close aboard. Tom, below, explains that the whales were in a rush, going 17 knots. "It's not every day you're sailing through the Southern Ocean with 8 of your mates and an OBR." (laughs) "And seeing tha tthing going on around you is pretty cool. Something you're gonna remember for the rest of your life, I think." Drone shot circling the boat.Brunel is sailing in the sun in about 14 knots of wind on starboard gybe. Annie emerges from the cabin to walk on deck. Kyle: "Get her on the bow!" Annie: "Get my harness on." Annie takes a few practice turns on the grinder handles. She raises her arms. Annie, sitting on the stack: "Below doesn't smell that good anymore. It's quite nice to be out in the fresh air even if it's cold." She explains taht she talked to the doctor, and he thought she should only be making tea and coffee. She's only on deck because conditions are so light, she says. She turns the grinder handles under load.Below, Bouwe says their current ability to hold onto Vestas means they're doing a good job. He thinks they'll have a chance when they approach Melbourne. Shots on deck. Shifting the stack forward. Slomo waves. Drone shots of Brunel triple-heading with the A3.Jena, grinding in the cockpit on the middle pedestal, talks about making gains on every sched. Still hope with more than 1,000 miles to go that they can catch them. Mark, in the cockpit: "The two most competititve boats that we're racing are currently ahead of us in this leg. So yes, of course it matters to me. I want to beat them. I want to be first. I want to win." [Sounds a little annoyed with Sam's question.] Sam asks Jena to do a "weather dance". She dances at the pedestal. Jena: "What do you think about that?" Charlie, at the helm: "Well, we haven't seen any results yet. So." Jena: "Don't worry. I'll show my magic. Dancing magic." Crew kidding in the cockpit; TJ says something about going to Outback Steakhouse. Nick laughs. Charlie hands the wheel off to Chuy. Sam, to Charlie: "How was the watch, Chaz?" Charlie: "Transitional. It went from windy to not so windy. Drag all the sails forward... Little frustrated with the boatspeed... Kind of tough sailing right now with the leftover slop."Drone shots of TTToP sailing under MH0 and J3 in light winds. GoPro shot of Liz going to the masthead. At the masthead she holds Wisdom and voices him: "Hi everybody! Volvo... Ocean.. Race... 'm going flying, watch me! They're fixing a sail down there. Look, ther'es another bird. Hi! I'm going back in Liz's pocket now. It's scary up here." Back on deck, Wisdom talks about wanting to really fly. Dolphins under the bowsprit. Jérémie takes video of Liz taking a picture with her phone. On the foredeck, Bianca (?) works on repairing a sail. Martin and Frederico also repairing the sail. Frederico: "On my Finn boat it's just put some duct tape and that's it." Lucas paces in the cockpit. "Long way to Melbourne like this, I'll tell you that. Seven knots. We might be there by NEXT Christmas if we're lucky.... No matter how sloe we go, Christmas keeps getting closer." Nicolas talks about high pressure costing them access to the wind, could be 8 days to Melbourne.Jack, in the cockpit, talks about having fought with MAPFRE since day one. "This morning they managed to get ahead a bit, which is very disappointing. But we still can see them, we've still got about 4 days to the finish, so the fight's not over. And I think the arrival into Australia will be quite hard, so nothing will be over until we properly cross the finish line." Stu: Th enext few days are going to present some interesting opportunities" moderate downwind sailing at the moment, but some strong downwind sailing over 30 knots, couple of gybes... The difference between MAPFRE and ourselves so far have been little small mistakes by either team." Looking for an opportunity to get back into it. Confident in the boat and the team."If they make any mistake we'll be right there to pounce." Sunset shots of them sailing on starboard gybe. Pascal and Kevin, below, looking grim. Kevin talks in French.Someone (Nicho?) steering. Nicolai at the nav station, flips through a small notebook. "It's been a little bit difficult leg when it comes to the damage on board." Talks about not being able to replace spares in Melbourne, and only having two members of the shore team on the boat. He's going thorugh the list of spares and trying to figure out how to best repair things in Melbourne while still having spares for the leg to Hong Kong. He taps on the keybaord. Someone (Brad?) up the rig in light conditions. GoPro footage from Brad as he goes to the masthead. Head of the MH0, running lights, wind instruments. On the helm, Justin explains that he's doing a rig check, that conditions have eased enough for it to be safe for him to do so. He laughs: "We just had him up there a few days ago in 40 odd knots of breeze." We see him remove the windpoint. On deck, he says the rig is looking fine. Says the windpoint was snapped on day 1 in 40 knots. Nicolai, below, talks about how it's good to have different skills among the crew. "Jules is really good with electronics and nav stuff. Luke is a sailmaker. Simeon and myself can do a lot of boatbuilding and boat work... I think we can have hte boat race-ready pretty quickly when we get to Melbourne."Annie writes a sign on the whiteboard: "CAFE IS OPEN! TODAYS SPECIAL: 'THE VESTAS CHASER'". Annie in the galley preparing something. "Feeling much better. Finally out of my bunk after 72 hours. It feels amazing. They've been really good. I feel like I have an email relationship with Spike now. We speak every 6 hours... I keep asking if I can push through the pain, and he doesn't like that... I think by lunchtime today I'm going to be negotiating on when I can go back on deck... At least I can make breakfast. Do something for the team, which feels good, because I've been watching them work for 3 days. Yesterday, at least I can make the meals, and clean a bit. If it helps the guys have more time in the their beds, hopefully it's helping a little bit." She preps a meal in an insulated box. Talks with Abby. "With gravy? I'll see what I can whip up."Grinding. MAPFRE on port gybe, Dongfeng passing a half mile behind them on starboard. Xabi, below, talks about battle with Dongfeng, gybing along the exclusion zone, now more of a drag race. Shot of stackign in the cockpit. Slomo of stacking sailors in the washing machine. Xabi: "I'd prefer to be the hunted than the hunter." Rob, below, talks about competition bringing out the best of both teams. Changing between the MH0 and the FR0. Shot in the cockpit as they're sailing fast on starboard gybe with Willy trimming. Xabi below, talks about a lot happening in the days ahead. A lighter patch, then a tough low that will be very windy, though not as much as a week ago. Then the tricky approach to Melbourne. Rob talks about chipping away at Dongfeng. Slomo washing machine on deck. Xabi: "I think the crew is performing 100%." Performance improving, and needs to through the end of the race. But everyone is motivated and hungry.Peter, below, talks about making gains against Vestas, who are now relatively close. He sounds fairly exhausted. Stacking on deck. Gopro shots of grinding, steering. Drone shot of Brunel's bow with someone working the bowsprit (Carlo?). Drone shots of peeling to the A3, major spray on the bow.At nav station, Charlie explains to Sam that there aren't a lot of decisions to make right now; they're just pushing the boat for boatspeed as they parallel the ice limit. Decisions to be made shortly about where to go later. Risk/reward analysis changes based on waht happens at the back of the fleet behind them. On deck, Jena steers on port gybe in about 15 knots of wind under a cloudy sky. Then TJ (invisible in balacava; thank goodness for accents) steers and talks about Jena, about getting her time on the helm when conditions aren't too technical. By the end, he says, she'll be driving as much as anyone else. Nick, on the stern, says he wants Chuy to start a men's fashion line. Has him model his baseball cap stitched onto a neoprene balaclava (as described by Tony). Some discussion of Tron that I didn't really understand. Then SiFi talks about trying to catch the two red boats ahead (though unfortunately Vestas has less wind), and about Brunel about 20 miles behind them. Future wind prospects. Nick and SiFi, in the companionway. Nick: "This boat is a prison." SiFi: "There's no escape."Liz is steering as TTToP sails on port gybe with full main in 15 knots of wind. Francesca trims the main. Bianca carries her gear to the stern where she gets dressed (maybe she was using it as a bathroom too?) Liz talks about how they're not THAT isolated, because they have the fleet around them. Also there are a lot of islands in this part of the Southern Ocean, so there is shipping and fishing boats. "It's the next part of the Southern Ocean where you feel really isolated." Frederico talks about isolation not crossing his mind much; too busy sailing the boat. In the companionway, Bleddyn brushes his teeth. Cabin shot of the crew on the stern, Elodie, trimming, calls "Main on." Wisdom tucked into the pit coaming. Below, Bleddyn (?) gets dressed. Slomo closeup of Bianca bundled up on deck. Slomo closeups of Nicolas, Francesca (who laughs), Dee, Lucas, Martin. Drone shot from close to the port quarter as TTToP triple-heads on port gybe. More cool drone shots with low sun behind them. Interesting that I think Jérémie managed to get everyone in the crew (other than himself) in this video.Ben does a radio [?] voice: "...Scallywag, 5483, bound for Melbourne." Tom sits at the nav station with António behind him looking at routing software. Tom: "My life consists of 3 hours on, 3 hours off. 3 hours on. 3 hours off. I don't even know what time it is. I don't even know if it's morning or night. It all looks the same down here. [To António] What time is it?" António: "8:30... In the morning." Tom: "We've been in sunlight now for 9 hours. It's 8:30 in the morning. Go figure." Parko sits on the gally, picking through a bag of some sort of food, picking out his favorite bits and eating them. Talks to Alex, who's getting his foulies on. Parko: "Mom must be angry." Alex: "Mom, don't tell me what to do!" Parko: "But mom, I'm in the middle of the ocean." Parko: "I'm going on watch. A bit delirious. I probably should have slept, but I didn't. So I've got a lot of sugar and some coffee and I'll be good. We need to turn left. [laughs] We're going across Free-o [Freemantle?] and the Australian Bight. But there's two big ridges in the way. Once we're across them we'll be all right. But there's a big stop sign in the middle. Highway 1 is about to shut down." Alex reads the label of his protein bars. "Times two. Lunch." Parko: "I think morale's starting to pick up a bit. Everyone's dried out. Fresh pair of [something], fresh pair of socks; everyone's starting to smell a bit better too... We just don't want to have to gybe around the finish and start again. Want time for a little snooze." Alex, with talcum powder [?] on his hands, jokes with Annemieke. Alex: "Hey, Bessie. High five!" They slap hands and a cloud of powder fills the air. They laugh. Fish talks about how they're halfway, forecast is quite nice, sun's out and it's a bit drier, and everyone's happier. "And the kettle's just boiled; perfect." Ben puts food cubes in the mug in preparation for the hot-water treatment. Annemieke: "We're just enjoying what we're doing. It's not always ideal; we're all wet. But we're all happy. And we just found out that we're getting pretty late into Melbourne; the forecast has lightened down. So not that much time for preparation for Hong Kong."Willy, on the stern trimming the mainsheet, talks in Spanish saying something about two days, Dongfeng, ice gate, fighting, sleeping, cold. (3 years of high school Spanish, folks.) Xabi, his arm around the runner, talks to Jen while Willy steers. He talks about having a long board now since the gybe this morning, so people can sleep/recover. They've had a whole off-watch. He offers Jen water. Jen: "No thanks." Xabi talks in Spanish. Xabi talks to someone off-camera (Rob?) in English. Xabi: "Last time the Southern Ocean leg was very hard as well, you remember? Lots of gybing..." Then the storm after the... spreader broken [?]. Xabi: "I think the last 48 hours have been very intense. For us, [points toward Dongfeng ahead and to windward] for both of us for sure. We've done, I haven't counted, more than 20 gybes, and it's been very hard. But it's good fun as well, we've had good battle with Dongfeng. We passed them, they passed us again, and now they are 3 miles [?] away... It's one week to go, hopefully after today and tomorrow we will gybe, and have little bit quiet for the last week, but it's going to be windy again, and it's going to be a full-on fight with Dongfeng." Willy, on the mainsheet, jokes about sending a message to his friend. "Please! [something] come and save me!"Cabin shot of the stern with Dongfeng sailing fast under gray skies. Slomo waves, spray, washing machine. Of the three on the stern, in closeup it looks like Marie grinding. She makes a shaka sign. On the helm, Fabien eats something orange. On the mainsheet, Stu looks resolute; starts to eat something. Below, Charles takls about the remainder of the leg. Five days to go, 2,000 miles. Two big decisions: first one tonight, second one in two days, when they decide to go north to go to Melbourne. That will be the key probably. For the moment, strongest point of Dongfeng, reaching. MAPFRE was quite fast downwind. "I would say that 80-90% of the race now is downwind. Unfortunately it's not the big reaching. I think everyone is happy to be ahead of MAPFRE, but everybody knows that they are not far... We will do it but for sure it will be a great fight.... As you know it is a very important leg... To be first is good but it's always a lot of pressure." Shot of writing on a Dongfeng bumper sticker on the cabin bulkhead: "Never give up. - Wolf" On the stern, Marie throws bits of food for the person trimming the main (Stu?) to catch in his mouth. He succeeds; they high-five.Slomo of Jules on the stern (steering?) in purple cap. He looks up. Focus shifts to show albatross. Slomo shots of albatrosses. Slomo waves off the stern.Slomo through wheel of the ocean. Slomo water in cockpit, Martine's corn rows. Below, Martine talks about how the double points in the leg are going to really hurt them. "It's a bit disappointing. But it's still a long race to go so the chances are still there." Simeon: "We're up to speed, but yeah, a long way behind the pack. We're doing good polars... fingers crossed there are still some opportunities." Nicho: Talks below about the same thing (double points, finishing at the back)... "One maneuver gone wrong, and before that we were competing nicely. People gotta... draw faith that we can do it. We can match up with these guys. Frustrating part now is we've gotta wait for our next opportunity. We probably won't get another opportunity on this leg. Sadly I think we're done. It's not gonna stop us trying." Simeon: "It makes you realize that one bad gybe can cost you a lot in one day... Yeah, it's a setback, but the race's not over." Martine, chewing and staring into space: "Well. You gotta have the bad ones to realize the good ones. Yeah."Condensation dripping inside from a grab rail. Firehose shot of the foredeck while Vestas is triple-heading. SiFi, unrecognizable in his balaclava except by voice, talks about how they're now drag-racing, not gybing. "We're starting to pin our ears back and sail fast." On the stern, Tony talks about the current conditions. He asks the termperature; Stacey answers "Nine and nine." Tony explains: 9 degrees C air, 9 degrees water. He talks about how even with all the layers you get cold, but if you move you get hot and then sweat, and then you get wet and cold again. Tony talks about his 3-day-old protein bar he's found in his pocket and is going to eat. Stacey says she can do better: Pulls out a bar. "Tropical holiday."Dee, at the nav station, explains about how the ice limit has been moved since they started racing, and the effect of that is that they have different wind conditions to sail in. "To the north of us is a big high pressure, to the south is a barrier we can't quite cross, and it leaves us this very narrow corridor of breeze to sail in." She explains this is her sixth time in the Southern Ocean, and she doesn't remember sailing this far north in this area. Doesn't think she's sailed north of the Kerguelen Islands before. Talks about climate change as a possible factor in pushing the ice further north. Harder work to sail this way, but better safety. Screenshot of the ice limit and Kerguelen Islands. Stacking. Francesca does the Twist to pull a stacking pole from the deck. Franchesca on the helm. Crew plays roshambo. Slomo washing machine over Bianca (I think) on the aft grinder pedestal.Epic slomo shot of a big Southern Ocean wave. Nicho, below, eating: "Batten fouled again and another repair again. Getting there. Main's back up, so it's not slowing us down any." Justin, below, repairs a batten. "This is Frankenbatten. It's now got four different battens in it." He shows his work: The batten with multiple clamps holding the pieces together while glue cures. "We're obviously trying to be tidy Kiwis who use as much [something] as we can, 5200." There are clamps made from vice grips, from channel lock pliers with a big rubber band around the handle squeezing it closed, and a high-tech looking black clamp. Don't tell the media guy, but I've raided his camera box and found a clamp. Which I'm sure he's going to work out when it gets back that it's been used for some sort of repair." Nicho: "We don't mind doing all these running repairs all the time as long as we can go at pretty much full pace. But it wears everyone out. I don't think Brad has had a full off watch for a long time now. [To Brad.] When was your last full off watch?" Brad (sitting near the galley, pulling off bits of tape): "Can't remember my last full off watch." Brad, to James: "Haven't seen land for over a week now. As far away from anything as you can possibly be, more or less. It's not too bad. It's actually quite cool. Really good breeze, good waves. Good sailing." Martine coils lines in the pit, gets washed over by a wave. Below, she talks to Konrad: "Southern Ocean has been pretty cool, going downwind, in these big waves, sailing during the night with big seas. Cold weather as well. Everythying is dripping on the boat, but sailing has been pretty good, besides our breakdown. As long as we have all the sails up, it's all good." Nicho: "You have moments when you wonder what you're doing down here. Other moments quite in awe of the natural bueauty and harshness of the place... How vulnerable you are down here on a little carbon shell in the middle of nowhere. You want the leg to be over, but also how special it is to be here." Slomo of Nicho on the helm, albatross flying by. [Side note: Again, no Simeon. I'm increasingly of the view that Nicho is actually functionally skipper at this point.]Drone shot of Scallywag reaching on starboard with the MH0 and J2 in 12 knots of wind. Witty, on the rail: "I think MAPFRE and Dongfeng and Brunel got in they're own little fight there. Gotta worry about AkzoNobel [?] and we did our 'buffalo girl around the outside'. So just all trying to zoom south at the moment. But Scallywags are in a pretty good position here. Long way to go though. Quite nice, really, We're just sorta sailing our own [something], making our own decisions. Got a couple right. We'll get a couple wrong soon... We're actually further south than them now [looking at tracker, not sure what he's talking about], so we gotta defend our psition for a bit. Tomorrow night we've got 50 knots. Gotta get through all that unscathed and see what happens. But I think this is the last time we'll be sitting in the sun on the deck and talking." High drone shot of Scallywag with sun behind them.Dongfeng, on starboard, crosses behind MAPFRE on port. Possibly the same cross seen in the previous MAPFRE video? Shot of spray on the bow, in sun, as Dongfeng triple-heads on port gybe. Drone shot of Dongfeng sailing on port gybe witih MAPFRE crossing on starboard about a mile behind them. Kevin steering. Someone grinding. Drone shots of Dongfeng sailing fast. Kevin talks about gybing with MAPFRE along the ice limit. "We had the last good move... It's nice to see that after one week of race we are still seeing each other."Annie, with no foulies on below, puts her foot down and holds on, wincing, as she slowly adjusts her position to get out of her bunk. She says something to Abby, next to her. Lying down, she describes getting pushed into the guy wire against the back of the boat. Big pain in her right side, couldn't move her right leg. Couldn't stand up, couldn't crawl. Ice gate was coming up; guys had to drag her along the deck and put her in the bunk. Shot of them taking her foulies off as she describes the pain. "It's like a burning pain." Bouwe: "Suggest the only thing is get the gear off now, and get her in the sleeping bag." Later, as she's lying down, she describes the pain to them: "It's like a 6 most of the time. And then sometimes it's a shooting pain that's more like an 8." Bouwe: "Most important thing is get her down, even if the ice gate is coming up... Security first. Before any medication I just made a quick call... Because if there's any internal bleeding then of course you can do wrong things." Every 4 hours she's getting [something; presumably painkillers]. "But she's a tough cookie." Shot of Bouwe on the phone at the nav station, writing notes, crew pawing through bag for medicine. Bouwe talking to Annie in her bunk. I think they're talking about where the pain is. Bouwe: "It's basically on the [bum?], yeah? That's good, because I was worried at the time [something]." Annie: "It's my lower back." Bouwe pats her on the shoulder. Annie, in her bunk: "Since then for the last 24 hours I've been in my bunk. Bouwe called Spike [?] yesterday, I've been on painkillers, I've just emailed him a few hours ago to see if he knows what it might be and if there's any way to fast-track getting me back on deck. At the moment we're going along the ice gate and we're gybing a lot and I feel very bad that I can't help everyone with the stacking and gybing. It's hard to stack myself. The goal is to get back on deck as soon as I can. We're not even halfway through the leg yet, so, yeah. I really need to recover quickly." Carlo, below with Sudocrem (?) on his lower face, goes through a bag labeled "First Aid". Louis: "It's one pair of hands less on deck, so it's obviously much harder, there's much more work to do. So if you're with four persons on deck there's always one who can rest. So now it's 4 hours full on, grinding, trimming, driving. So then you suddenly realize how much Annie does. I really miss her in my watch for sure."MAPFRE is sailing downwind on port gybe. Pablo is steering, Louis is grinding, Blair is trimming. Blair squints into the sun. "Where are they?" Shot of Dongfeng crossing on starboard a few hundred yards astern of them. [Note: This might be a different time than the squinting; it's no overcast.] Blair talks to Jen about how this morning earlier they'd gone below after a gybe and heard them easing the sheets, poked his head up and say MAPFRE cross about 5 meters behind Dongfeng. Talks about giving a "cheeky wave." "Since then there's been 3 or 4 crosses, and they're about a mile ahead now." Slomo washing machine.Tony and Simon are sitting on the weather rail. Tony is in the middle of a story about seeing an iceberg. "It was right there, hundreds of meters long, 25, 30 meters high, or whatever they are. And that was the one you can see in the middle of the day... And then nighttime comes and radar's got targets everywhere. And those are only the big ones. Can't see the bus or car-sized ones." Simon, at the nav station, talks about being near the exclusion zone. Simon explains about how the trailing boats have had an easier time, while the lead boats have had to stair-step along the edge of the exclusion zone. Shot of the computer screen showing the exclusion zone. Tony points out the "wall". "Must have painted it gray; it blends right in." Nick is getting dressed; he tells a bedtime story to Jena, in her bunk. "Once upon a time there were 7 lonely sailboats in the Southern Ocean, on their way to Melbourne." He explains to Sam: "I'm telling the Swiss Miss girl." "On their way to Melbourne to have a very hot Southern Hemisphere Christmas. And then, the wild and scary Race Committee decided to put a liquid Himalaya ice gate that we had to climb atop, so we wouldn't be there for Christmas Day." Jena: "Did they steal our Christmas?" Nick and Tom are internal-stacking onto the port side; Tom mimes being attacked by killer bees. "They're eating my eyes!" On the helm, Chuy says there's a rule, like on a bus: Don't speak to the driver. Jena, sitting in the cockpit in a balaclava: "I actually got a little sad, because I feel Santa will never find us out here." SiFi: "It's true. I didn't even bring my stocking." Tom: "No Christmas for you. We're gonna keep you at sea. Make you sail around waypoints forever!" Jena jokes about a broken candycane being in 3 pieces so they can share. Tony and SiFi talk about icebergs. Tony doesn't need to see any more of them. SiFi: "They make the ice gates on a good scientific basis." Tony: "I've passed south of one that was 30 miles long, and it was no fun... I've dodged them, and been just about able to touch them from the wheel. That's how close we were... If they've got the information, as SiFi says, it'd be negligent not to act on it... Safety. Safety first." Sunset.High drone shots of TTToP surfing. Drone shot buzzed by an albatross. Drone shot of the beginning of a gybe.Below, Pablo talks in Spanish. (Same as the previous video, where he talked in English about keeping their clothes on when off watch because they were going up to gybe every hour.)Wake shot as MAPFRE sails fast with the sun setting behind them. Blair, below in a red light, talks about how it's hard to know when the day started; 12, 24, 36 hours. Gybing every hour if you're on watch; if you're off-watch trying to get down below and get a quick bite to eat, get in your bunk as quick as you can. Louis prepares something to eat in the galley in the light of his headlamp. "Managed to make some pretty good gains on Dongfeng so we're pushing hard." Pablo, standing near the hatch: "Two hours" (until the next gybe). Blair: "Two hours? That can't be right. It's too long!" Támara laughs. Louis asks Jen what's in the food bin behind her. Jen: "Pasta bolognese." Blair hands it out. Later, Jen asks Pablo how he's feeling. "We have just started so at the moment not too bad. We are wet, tired and hungry, all of us. The good thing is it is not that cold anymore. Doing all these aneavers we are quite warm. But there's 18 hours to go, so this is nothing." Talks about hwo it's important to do all these maneuvers to stay close to Dongfeng along the ice limit. Talks about how it's helpful that they're so close by so they can see if they're gaining or losing. Birds astern. Blair talks about getting back in his gear; Willy kids him. Pablo, below, talks about watches. We see footage on deck of a gybe while his audio continues. Have to keep the clothes on because the maneuvers are so frequent. On deck, Xabi talks to Jen with the sunrise behind him: "We've got 20 more of those coming, today and tomorrow. So that's good. Plenty of power here."Drone shot of Scallywag triple-heading on port in light wind with a blue sky. Just a pleasant day at sea. Pretty drone shot with sunset behind them.Somone (Brad?) works on the masttrack up the mast. Simeon says it's the second attempt, with different glue. "Not a specified curing time like the books. But we hope it's strong enough." Going to hoist the main again, and put a strap around where the batten car is and hpe for the best. Everyone looks at the sail with expressions of concern. Nicho: "It'll work". With the main up they sail faster. Everyone looking up. Nicolai on the stern talks about how they knew after the first one it wouldn't be a good repair, but they knew after this one it would be a good one. "It's holding." Below, Nicho is getting his foulies off. "Been sailing two or three hours, and no problems, so... Hopefully now we can be 100% to Melbourne, catch some miles up." In the background Martine gets her foulies off. Nicho talks about how there could be a weather pattern that would pull the boats together. "We're a long way behind, but no one's giving up." Talks about needing to make the next start, and get the boat fully prepared and operational.Slomo shot of waves through the wheel. Interesting slowed-down audio. An albatross flies by. Slomo grinding. Slomo faces; Carolijn on the helm. Slomo trimming. Below, Carolijn takes off her gear. She talks to Martin; behind Fabien is making food in the galley. Carolijn: "Yes, it's painful. Not necessarily painful, it's just tough. It's very tiring. You get to a certain stage where you're so tired that you start tripping over your own feet. If you don't watch out it can be quite dangerous." Talks about even 20 minutes lying down in your bunk, even if you don't sleep, helps you get the energy to make the next gybe. "I've lost count. I don't even know if we're halfway yet. Just in the last 3 hours of my off watch we've done 6 gybes?... Entertaining stuff." Fabien eats with a bit of a 1,000-yard stare. (Looking at the tracker through this section it's been brutal; Dongfeng and MAPFRE are at the front of the fleet within AIS range of each other having a running gybing battle to see who can stay closer to the exclusion zone.) Pascal, below, drops his head and rubs it. Looks tired. We pull back and see he's watching Charles at the nav station from his bunk. Charles talks to Martin: "It's very simple. During 30 hours we're having to gybe every hour so it's a nightmare. Not very funny but we have no choice. We have the ice limit for a good reason... You have to stack every time, 600 kilos each time... You don't manage to sleep... That's life at the extreme for sure. On the positive side, we are ahead with MAPFRE and fighting for the first place, so it's good."Nick, in his bunk: "We have crossed that point where people have started losing it. And some of those people have also found the caffeine chewing gum. So things are getting quite loose on board." On the stern with the setting sun behind them, Tony shouts, "Cue the rainbow!" We see a rainbow ahead of them. "All we need now is a couple of icebergs to complete the set." Below, Nick continues: "Big Tones [Tony]; coincidently, he was talking about being in the Truman Show yesterday. So I'd say he's feeling the sleep deprivation pretty nicely at this point." Tony: "I thought we'd just sail round and round in circles, around the wall. That sounds just fine to me." SiFi, standing next to him: "By the top corner in the ice gate, we might be able to get through that little door and escape... It's good we're playing Truman Show and not Hunger Games. Hunger Games the consequences are way worse than this." Tony: "The Kracken would be climbing over the side to get us." Tom on the helm joins in. "Hunger Games and Truman Show [something I can't catch]. Becuase they can control the weather, they can control the... Remember they make that fire?" Nick below: "TJ is also probably feeling a bit loopy, but I guess that's pretty much on par with TJ, so shouldn't be too worried about him." Jena, below: "As hard as it is physical, it's also a mental game, this thing. There's a lot of time where you have time to make your thoughts, and wonder. Maybe the most reasonable person to talk to is yourself." SiFi sits at the computer. "Holy shit. That sched is about as bad as it can get. Had a pretty slow 6 hours, pretty light winds and pretty unstable breeze. and as expected everyone is else moving along pretty nicely... It's funny to see how people change when things get a bit lighter. There's a chance to relax a bit, have a joke. But I think we're all a little bit crazy." Shot of them surfing toward the rainbow. Tony: "I don't know who was in the technical department. They deserve a pay raise." Nick, in his bunk: "I would never ask TJ to make a big decision. It would stress me out." On deck, at sunset on the stern, Stacey asks a series of questios of Tom. "Would you rather be itchy or sticky." Tom: "Sticky". "Blind or deaf?" Tom: "Tough one. A sad one. I dunno. I can't answer that one." "Would you rather be in the Truman Show or the Hunger Games?" "Truman Show. Nah, Hunger Games. Changed my mind. You get some action." Sam: "Are you feeling the mental effects of being offshoe?" Tom: "Most likely, yeah. Every day, man. One hour at a time, Sammy, out here. One minute at a time." Stacey: "I've got a real good last question. What's the first thing you're gonna eat when you get to Melbourne?" Tom: "I want an avocado... and a coffee." He and Tony seque into a beer commercial. "And the best cold beer is Vic."Below, on port gybe, Pablo gets dressed in his bunk above the nav station. Kyle stands in the galley eating something. Pablo explains the importance of getting the boots and pants just right so they don't get wet. Because once it gets wet it's wet. A little break is enough. He then explains the same thing in Spanish.Kyle getting dressed below. He talks about how the water temperature is 6 degrees. Miserable on deck. Good motivatino to keep grinding. Carlo, below, talks about how cold it is. Kyle lists the layers of clothes he's wearing. "Rugged up as much as possible. But you still get wet, and cold." More getting dressed. "I think the worst thingis putting on a wet balaclava." He goes on deck. Carlo: "The best thing when you come inside is that you're not on deck, getting firehosed all the time. But the worst thing is you have to take off all your gear, and it takes 30 minutes." He takes off his gloves, shows his hands. He talks about how little cuts from on shore become infected. "You have to take care of your hands." We see Alberto below.Elodie, belwo, talks in French. I got nothing; the word "boat" occurs several times. We see her coming off the deck, dripping and her breath fogging. She preps a warm drink. Epic washing machine shots of the stern from the cabin as she steers. Shots from on deck as they surf fast. Slomo washing machine from the cabin. Cool drone shots of them surfing FR0, J3, and reefed main. (Seems like they're sailing a bit on the cautious side for the conditions, sail-area-wise. Which I'd expect, give Dee's brood of chickens she's trying to get safely to Melbourne. They're already likely to beat at least one boat that pushed too hard at the wrong time.)Preparing to go on deck, Francesca jokes about her wearing sunglasses and not being able to see but them keeping her warm. "I doubt all be able to see any people. At the first wave. I can see something. It's nice... Sunglasses keep me warm. It's a hard life." Dee, off camera, laughs with her. Someone else (Jérémie the OBR?) calls out, "Good luck, Frankie." She waves back. "Thank you very much. Grazie mille." She blows a kiss and goes out the hatch. Dee points and laughs. Francesca pokes her head back in the hatch. Her life vest has deployed. "I'm back." We see her below getting out of the life vest. Crash cam footage from the stern as they nosedive and broach on port gybe. Below (presumably during the same or a similar incident), we see a crewmember in the gally slip and fall to starboard. Dee calls out, "Are you allright?" She explains that in these conditions doing a Chinese gybe would be catastrophic. Boom would come across, hit the runner, boat would lie on its side, probably break all the battens and if not damage the main. "And everyone would not know what to do and would rattle about like headless chickens. Be panicking. Becuase while the boat's on its side it would probably be filling with water. And we're doing a good job of that just sailing. So the potential for damage is huge, and we're pretty happy it didn't happen." Ah: Now we see crash cam/stern cam footage of them gybing accidentally from starboard to port, but then immediately recovering and gybing back again without rounding down while people in the pit scurry around. Voices: "Oh fuck." "Main on!" (pause) Liz, I think, sounding calm. "We just gybed."Liz, below, smiling. "Basically, Lukey had one. He went hammering down a wave, nosedived, the rudder's came out of the water, I think. The cockpit filled up with water, and he was heeled over so much that the water came flying down the hatch. Because we were heeling over the wrong way. It went straight on me in my bunk." New socks were wet, boots filled with water, bunk now unusable so they have to share a bunk with the OBR. "Yeah." She nods. "Got a bit damp, really. Good day at the office." Crash cam footage from stern cam of the nosedive with Lucas on the wheel. Someone else is trimming the main behind him; Elodie is on the aft pedestal. She moves forward (in preparation for releasing the headsail if they gybe?), but Lucas gets it back. Slomo spray. Washing machine.Sophie, below, stands close to the companionway. She is turning her head under a blast of air associated with the running engine, maybe? "I just found my hair dryer. It's so good. Ah! Who needs the hairdresser? For the first time getting dry hair. It's getting pretty cold out actually. I'd say the water is 5 degrees or colder. The Southern Ocean's awesome. We are making a lot of miles very quickly. We're going good I think. The albatross are pretty cool. There's like 10 of them following the boat. It's super cool. But it's pretty wet and a little relentless. It's what we expect I guess. It's a little crazy." Intercut with shot of the cockpit, slomo washing machine, albatrosses behind the boat. Nice portrait by Jen of my unproblematic fave.Low-elevation wake shot of Dongfeng's stern, surfing fast. Jack on the helm surfing on port gybe in strong winds with a full main. Caroline, standing between the wheels, explains the situation: Typical of Southern Ocean, where you have a lot of clouds: white, gray, and black. Ahead of them now is a very dark gray cloud, and Pascal from the nav station has confirmed it from radar. So they need to keep an eye on it, in case it comes toward them or they overtake it. So Kevin is now preparing for a reef. Squalls like that can have 10-20 knots more wind. 20-odd knots now, so that would push them into 40s. Want to reef BEFORE the 40 knots, not in it. "It's a fun little game; it keeps us busy." Shots of them sailing into darker skies, triple-heading with a full main. Kevin grinding the forward pedestal.Pretty clouds. Crew shifting the stack as AkzoNobel sails downwind with the main lowered. Nicho explains that they've just finished stackign in preparation for hoisting the main. Talks about the repair; difficulty of getting a glue cure in the cold conditions. Maybe having a chance to catch some boats. Main goes up slowly. Nico, on the stern: "Tracks popped straight off. So obviously it couldn't hold in the conditions... Hopefully we'll get it down now, and... try it again. Still 3,000 miles to go." (Side note: It sure seems like Nicho has basically taken over the boat. Is Simeon even in command at this point?) Lowering the main. Martine gets washed off the cabin top by a wave; catches herself. They struggle to lower the main. Jules talks about the fleet being gone, not wanting to get down south and have to beat back, which they can't do. Nicho responds: "Well, we can step it down later in the day. Get a plan for this track. Even if the fleet's gone, get to Melbourne on time... for the next start." Below, Brad takes off his foulies. Looks very discouraged. "Pretty frustrating working two or three days to get it done, it pops off so quickly afterwards." Talks about trying to jury something else up, hope that that works. Slomo albatross. Below, working on the track repair, Nicolai watches Simeon eats in the background. "We've got five tubes of glue left, which means after this we've got one more. So this better work." More repair attempts on the mast. Emily watches from the stern. Nicolai, below, explains that the glue needs 6 to 8 hours to cure. Going to sail some more, and then try to hoist again before sunset.Spreader cam view of foredeck with Scallywag sailing way off the wind. Witty at nav station, talks about having "grannied" (tacked around, presumably) twice instead of gybing, because of having heard that AkzoNobel broke their mast track while gybing. Wants to keep the boat together here and finish fast. Jokes about the ice limit as a fence the Volvo people built in the ocean. Talks about having a week along the ice gate. Spreader cam shot of the boat surfing. Witty: "I told Parko to sail at 95%, not 100. He's doing 29 knots, so he must have taken a knot off. He si a full-blown lunatic." Crash-cam view of Parko being blown off the wheel by a wave while surfing; jumping back on the wheel. Parko below: "Yeah, I drove for a little bit with no hands there. Didn't Chinese and we didn't tack, so it's okay." Bow cam of spray. Alex, below, talks about steering. "Yeah, it's pretty difficult. I probably only do a half an hour at a time... It's tricky now, because the waves are so big that you don't want to go down some of them. But sometimes you kind of have to go down them... It's a bit of an art to go fast, but not go down the wrong waves and break the boat." Parko talks about it taking energy, having just done a gybe, it saps up all the energy from your little naps, it's gone after you have one maneuver. Time to eat some food and recharge, and be ready for the next one when it comes.Southern Ocean waves. Slomo waves. Crew on stern as Vestas sails downwind in large seas. SiFi, below, describes what an ice gate is. Shot of the computer screen showing routing software and their track bumping up to the ice gate. Charlie, below: "It would be nice to have a little bit more freedom. And we wouldn't actually have to do this. But because we do we've gotten pretty good at." Explains that it takes about 40 minutes to gybe due to stacking. Talks about how many times they have to do it. SiFi talks about sailing along the edge of the exclusion zone with all the gybing. SiFi getting dressed. "It's quite nice on deck. Gearing up's a little inconvenient." Shots of crew on deck. Grinding, Stacking. Charlie steering. Jena, below: "I hope we don't see any icebergs." Chuny, below: "Safety first." On the stern (trimming the mainsheet, I think), Tony points out where the ice gates are, 60 miles away. Sam: "Who builds these gates?" Tony: "I don't know. Maybe they've got a deal with Trump. An imaginary fencing company. I wonder how high it is. Twenty-one feet?" Tom (I think?) says it could be like The Truman Show. The clouds coult be painted. Stacey and Tom join in. Jena: "We're actually in a big pool of water, and they're just moving the water underneath us. And we're not going anywhere." Tony: "We're actually in a room with a green screen behind us, and they're throwing buckets of water on us." Epic surfing shot from astern. Slomo washing machine.Martin gets dressed below. Dee says something to him. He goes on deck. Washing machine. View of him steering. Epic slomo shot of spray enveloping the stern from both sides. Slomo spray off bow. Martin gets major spray in the face.Hgh speed wake shot. Stern cam of surfing in very high winds. Pascal at the nav station. Fabien, below, talks about how they're approaching the ice limit. Will need to do some gybes to stay in the pressure. Bow cam of Dongfeng surfing. Mast cam of cockpit during gybe. Stern cam of the end of the gybe. Looked good. Marie, below, talks about how on deck it's a washing machine. Have to grab the pedestal to stay onboard. Life jacket, clipped in. "I hope the wind will decrease a bit." "We are still ahead... But the three last days are very difficult for me." Sunset washing machine shot of stern. Closeups of pit from inside cabin. Winches, spray. Water cascading into the cockpit.Bouwe, below, talks about how Dongfeng and MAPFRE are ahead of the low and have a better wind angle than Brunel does. Talks about where the boats are. How they were sailing yesterday in a top speed of 60 knots. "People have to remember that's Force 12. That's pretty scary. But everything is fine; the boat is in one piece. That's the most important thing. The people are fine as well." Talks about the outlook, that the people in front get to ride the front longer than them. But you never know; there's 4,000 miles to go. Coming into Melbourne can be tricky. "We got a mail from the Race Office that they had some breakages. Of course it's unfortunate for them.. just one of those things, a mistake.. of course it's expensive in multiple ways, result-wise probably not very good, and probably get a penalty as well, so it's a double whammy." Slomo shots on deck: waves, someone steering, grinding, washing machine in sun and high wind. Wake with birds. Someone on the bow with a new sail.Oh wow. My jaw literally dropped watching that. Drone footage of AkzoNobel sailng under FR0 and J2 (I think?) with no main, as two crew members up the mast repair the track (I'm assuming). Epic low-altitude shots with Southern Ocean waves heaping up between the drone and the boat. Sheerwaters or albatrosses (gotta get a field guide to identify those better) swooping right past the drone multiple times. Final shot of crew working on the mast, then pulling back and climbing to show AkzoNobel surfing alone through the Southern Ocean. That's, like, the shot of the race for me right there.Crash cam footage from the stern cam. Rob is on the helm as MAPFRE surfs in high wind on port gybe. He gets washed off the wheel (and his life vest appears to be inflated already? it certainly is afterward). They broach; Louis runs forward to ease the jib. I think I hear Sophie's voice at one point, too? But I don't see her. Presumably she's trimming the main sheet, behind the helm.MAPFRE is sailing fast on starboard gybe in high wind. Blair approaches. Louis, trimming the main, asks: "You gonna drive?" Blair: "Yeah." Blair takes the helm (can't see from whom). Epic footage of them surfing. Louis, to Jen: "Wild ride, huh?" Jen: "Yeah." Louis explains how they've gybed, and the waves are up, and it's "nicer to keep it at a consistent 23 [boatspeed]". He mentions they had a broach before. We see the crashcam footage from the earlier video of them broaching. Louis: seems to be enjoying himself, talks about enjoying the sailing. washing machine. Someone (can't see who) has their life jacket inflate from the wave. They laugh.Crash cam footage from stern camera. AkzoNobel is preparing for a gybe in high winds from starboard to port. They gybe happens, but goes too quickly (?), the main slams over, and there's a loud bang that sounds very ungood. We switch to handheld camera on the stern as crew is shifting the stack to port. They send someone aloft, where we can see the main has some major luff-car issues (?). Shot of the helmsman (Nicho?) on the port wheel with a nasty-looking squall beyond him. Awesome shot of him surfing the boat as a wave breaks on their port quarter; shot pans forward to show the crew working around the mast. We see them lowering the main, which has been detached from the mast with lines on the cars to help control its descent. Below, Nicho explains what happened. Had to gybe in 35-40 knots. "Had a bad one. Thought we had a good wave to go down, and as we went down the boat slowed up, stopped; I should have pulled out. We probably would have broached..." But what did happen is they slammed the main into the runner, breaking the battens and pulling the track off the mast. Getting the main down was tricky, with a 50-knot squall happening at the same time. Now just have a jib up, doing 16 knots in 45 knots of wind. Plan is to get the track screwed/glued back on, repair the battens, over the next day or two. But it's going to take time to get to 100%. And they have to be careful.Crash cam footage from the stern camera as MAPFRE rounds up to starboard in very strong winds. We see Louis run forward to ease the jib, then Blair comes forward and shelters in the weather side of the pit area. Rob (I think? by voice?) on the helm calls, "Okay! I got it!" as they start to come down, and Blair moves to the pedestal to grind the jib back in. (I think.)SiFi sits at the nav station looking at a routing screen on the computer. His breath is visibly fogging due to the cold. "It looks like we're walking the line between speed and safety reasonably well." Slomo of his breath fogging. With low sun behind them as they stand on the stern, Charlie and SiFi talk about a problem with the main. "There's so much friction on it on the spreaders and shit it's probably not going anywhere." Nick talks about a couple of squall lines came through, up to 45 knots. And going onto the third reef the headboard of the mainsail isn't going onto lock. Mark: "Well, we've got 44 knots, and if you look this way there's a massive cloud, and the water's more white than blue." Charlie jokes about not saying "white squall". Slomo. Sam to Mark: "How is it being down here?" Mark: "It's everything you'd expect. Windy, cold, we've got 48 knots right now. Look upwind. It's crazy. Doing 30 knots of boatspeed. It's pretty crazy, but somehow everything's still in control." Slomo wake.Below, the engine is running. (Maybe they run the engine continuously in these conditions so the keel hydraulics stay powered up?) Kyle talks about how they're really in the Southern Ocean now. 50 knots earlier, and consistently 45. Waves are huge. "It's awesome downwind sailing. It's all on." Talks about how you enjoy it when you're on deck, driving and trimming. But coming below it's like you're in a washing machine. Peter: "Had an experience pretty similar in a Sydney-Hobart a couple of years ago." This is a little easier because they're going with it. Happy they got the front sail furled before it hit. Just have the J2 and a couple of reefs, blowing 45. Talks about how they're slowing down a bit in the big puffs. Stern cam shot from the deck in sun as they surf. Bow cam. Mast cam. Seas are gnarly and very confused.VR 360-degree views as Scallywag surfs fast under a sunny sky.Looking forward, we see J3 unfurl in the foredeck cam. Spreader cam looking down as Scallywag triple-heads. Bow cam looking aft, stern cam looking forward as they surf in rough conditions.Witty, on the helm, gives a thumbs up and points forward as Scallywag sails fast on port gybe in windy conditions. Washing machine. Witty talks about the Southern Ocean. "Why do we all come down here?... I'm over the Southen Ocean." Witty, on the mainsheet: "Main on!" He takes spray in the face, turns to Konrad. "Beautiful Southern Ocean."Opens with a drone shot from behind of Vestas sailing on starboard gybe. A dark seabird (a shearwater, maybe?) is visible trailing the boat; the bird turns and flies RIGHT PAST THE DRONE. Overlapping audio of Sam asking SiFi, at the wheel, "Any second thoughts about sailing into this low?" We see Simon on the helm. "What's that Sam?" Stacey sits in the foreground chuckling. SiFi: "Second, third, fourth, fifth... Lots of thoughts... About how to get through it safely, and hopefully ahead." Below, Nick's face is mostly shadowed as he eats. "I guess I keep coming down here because this is where you're pushed the hardest, mentally and physically. And so far we're seeing the beignning of that with definitely the mental side pushing us hard, and the physical side is just about to start. Latest routing shows us doing about 1 million gybes between here and Melbourne. So we're going to try to figure out how we're going to make those as smooth as possible." On deck, Tom leans on the middle pedestal. "When it gets hard; hard, wet, and tired; it's hard, wet, and tired for all your mates on the other boats as well. Like Kyle Langford, the big seagull. He's gonna be tired. Pete Burling, Blair Tuke, Willy, Louis... everyoe's in the same boat. It's hard for everyone." Another shot of the shearwater buzzing the drone. Kyle: "It's hard for everyone. Sail fast. We're going to Australia. Heading home." He grins. "Heading home." Sifi is at the wheel as the boat barely moves in light wind. "Calm before the storm... Not really in the forecast, this light stuff." Below, Charlie tosses something round and blue in one hand, and says something I can't catch. "It's hever going to be easier than right now." (?) Wake as they sail fast under scary clouds. On deck, Charlie: "So far, so good." He grinds, gets a slap of water in the face. Mark talks about how they just put the second reef in, and have some water in the folds of the main, so they're trying to get it out. We see someone doing that with a boathook, getting hit by spray. Charlie talks about where the other boats are, geometry of trying to figure out where to aim to come out ahead of the other boats. "We've got more options up here. Whether they sneak around our bow remains to be seen." He talks about "separation anxiety", I assume because they're north of the other boats. "We'll know more in 12 hours I guess." Slomo washing machine, wake.Drone shots of TTToP sailing on port gybe, triple-heading with the MH0 (I think?) in about 15 knots of wind. Later, the drone looks down from above, and the J2 has been furled. Below, Nicolas sits at the nav station looking at routing software. We see him by the wheel, explaining to Liz, who's steering. Liz looks over the side at the area of the rudder. Someone (Elodie?) grinds. Wake through wide-angle lens. Wide-angle shot from behind as Lucas steers, surfing. He turns around briefly, taking both hands off the wheel to make dual shaka signs and stick his tongue out. Francesca, trimming the main, chuckles. They surf in increased wind. Bleddyn coils in the pit. A wave douses the pit. Later, it's almost dark, we see out from the cabin hatch as water washes into the cockpit.Brunel flops in no wind. Carlo scoots out on the bowsprit with a hammer (?) to free something, presumably. Sails flop in the foretiangle. Closeup of the windspeed indicator reading 3kt. Below, Louis recaps recent weather. "This morning we had a transition; we even had a couple of hours with 0-5 knots of boatspeed." Now they have gybed and are sailing fast on port gybe. AkzoNobel is 10 degrees off their bow, still on AIS. Farther ahead are MAPFRE and Dongfeng. Shots on deck of them sailing on port, double-heading in strong wind. Spreader cam views of someone working around the mast. Closeups of the wheel, holding the mainsheet. Reefed main. Spray. Shot of a second (third?) reef being put into the main.An albatross (Wandering Albatross, maybe?) soars by them in windy conditions. Washing machine action in the pit as someone (can't tell who) coils line under a reefed main; rest of the crew on deck is at the back of the boat. Stu and Jack, who is climbing onto the boom, secure the loose main at the bottom of the reef. Black, on the aft pedestal, gives two thumbs up. Shots of crew on the stern from the cabin.Apocalyptic slomo shot of light through dark gray clouds as spray swirls around the wake. Looking forward from the stern, they're sailing under J2 (I think) on the outrigger and reefed main. Someone calls "main on", and Nicolai grinds on the aft pedestal. He turns to the camera as he's grinding. "Into the Southern Ocean. This is where the fun begins." In slomo, Álex grins at the camera makes a peace sign, a thumbs up, and gestures forweard. Slomo spray.Scallywag sails in heavy wind on port gybe with J2 (I think?) and reefed main. Slomo: Tom, on the helm, ducks spray. Parko (I think?) works on the outrigger rigged forward on the starboard (leeward) side. Slomo shots of spray as they sail on port with reefed main and J2. View of the stern with crew stacking aft. Washing machine. Slomo of someone grinding on the aft pedestal.Below, closeup of a toolbag. Jack repairs something. He explains that in the current light conditions they've been doing repairs. Went up the rig, did some repair work on the water system. "Making the boat as sorted and safe as possible, then we hang on for the next 24 hours I think." Shot on deck of Kevin preparing to go aloft, then him up the mast checking the rigging. Shot of gear below. Carolijn and Kevn talking. Carolijn puts on a helmet. Kevin demonstrates the faceplate on the helmet to Martin. Kevin: "It's more for comfort than safety. So you can hide behind the glass." Carolijn and Kevin discuss his modifications to the helmet. Marie prepares food in the galley. Marie: "I think it's good to eat before the storm. I have a good rest and now I will have a good dinner, beef and potato. And let's go." Marie eating.Nicolai, on deck in his neoprene cowl in fairly light air, talks about how they're the most southern boat right now, and have just gybed. Fleet split into two groups; they're wth MAPFRE and Dongfeng. Below, Martine (in cornrows) bails out water. Jules and Nicho, at the nav station, look at routing software. Jules talks about being a bit disappointed in the latest sched, vs. MAPFRE and Dongfeng, Brunel. Nicho: "We coughed it up there last night." Separately, Nicho talks about how each of the boats separated; probably due to breeze. Shot of Simeon on the helm, scowling in his cold-weather cowl. Álex, in the cockpit, talks about how we are here, in the Southern Ocean, but it isn't normal conditions. "Like a pit stop before the next depression comes, with 35, 40 knots, straight to Melbourne." Nicolai talks about how variable the Southern Ocean is. "It's like a spring day in Denmark up north. So I'm enjoying it."Blair grinds the middle pedestal. Sophie on the mainsheet: "Hold." Xabi talks to her; they both grind. Xabi, to Jen: "It's all going pretty well." Talks about other boats around them: Dongfeng, Vestas, AkzoNobel, Brunel. "Tricky wind; up and down and very shifty." Gybing early morning. Pablo talks in the cockpit about the routing. "Maybe we do... 50 knots?" Sophie: "Fifty? Oh.. my... god.." Xabi on the helm: "We won't do 50." Pablo: "Right now the routing says that." Sophie: "And that's... 20 knots?" Xabi: "Yeah." Xabi, to Jen: "It's looking like real windy, next days... In a couple of days, 40 plus for a couple of hours." Talks about the ice gate. So get rest and food now, for later. Jen: "Any advice for me?" Xabi, smiling: "For you? It's gooa be good. It's gonna be rough (shrugs) and cold. Good fun." Sophie and Pablo convo continues, about how long it's going to be: up to 6 days. Sophie, to Jen, talks about making sure she's organized, has the right gear on, try to rest as much as she can tonight. "Just take it as it comes." Jen: "Any advice for me." Sophie laughs. Blair, from the pedestal: "Hold on." Sophie: "Hold on, Jen. Stay down below if you want to." Blair: "Have a nice stay in your bunk. That's what I'd do if I could." Shot of AkzoNobel on their starboard quarter.Charlie and Simon at the nav station looking at routing (I think?). Charlie is eating. Charlie jokes about how when the wind gets high enough there's no sail in the sail chart. Charlie: "It's just like, good luck. Bare poles?" Simon chuckles, jokes about how you don't bother with some data points: "100 true, 1,000 knots." They talk about apparent wind angle. Simon: "You can reach down; this is where you end up on the ice gate... Then it passes over and you're back to running again." Charlie: "Realistically is the J1 getting hanked on? Probably not." Simon: "No." Simon says J2, probably. "A bit like the Trans-atlantic, probably." Charlie: "It would be pretty tough. 25 knots is when the J2 becomes a realistic outrigger sail." Charlie: "So how are we going to get the A3... We could to the J0 for a little bit. J0/J2, something like that?" Tony, from his bunk: "How much wind you got in that low?" Charlie: "In the center of it?" Tony: "No, in the route." Charlie: "The part that affects us? 37 in the listed result." Tony: "So that's a good chunk into the 40s." Simon: "Yeah." Charlie, lookng at Sam: "We've gone higher." Tony: something I can't understand, like: So when you (something about being on the A3?) you get the (something) down there quick." (?) Simon: No, exactly. Tony: "Actually faster at 25, 23, 20 boat knots of breeze." Simon: "Yeah." That's a lot of experience talking there.In the cockpit (trimming the main, I suspect) Alberto talks about the next 24 hours as they head toward the depression. "At least for the moment it's still warm." Chuckles. Peter, sitting on the low side of the pit, talks about how conditions are going to change completely in the next day. Slightly lifting at the moment, later will gybe over, then on port will see "first bit of real Southern Ocean action for the leg. Yeah; it's gonna be pretty windy." Has his warm clothing downstairs. So far pretty nice this trip. Looking after the boat. Shot of someone working the bow in spray. Alberto grinding. Shifting the stack aft. Carlo working the clew of the headsail on a halyard. Abby repairing the pit winch. A rainbow ahead of them.Dee, below, talks about it being 24 hours before the first big depression. Need to do safety checks. Her responsibility for the safety of the crew. Musto ad. Survival suit. Layers. Teletubby appearance. On the stern, Luke talks about dangerous conditions down here, being smart. Preventative things: clip on, wear your life jacket. Bianca talks about her life jacket, auto-inflating (as she well knows!). Jackstays to clip in with safety lines. Signaling device, personal locator beaon, strobe light. Below, Lucas gets dressed in his foulies.Closeups: binnacle compass, hands on the wheel, easing the mainsheet. Marie, trimming the main, talks about the weather being warm, and no birds. It's sad they are too far north, not in the Southern Ocean. "Maybe tomorrow; we will see." Stu, on the helm. "Definitely not the Southern Ocean. We don't wear sunglasses in the Southern Ocean." (He laughs.) "This is far too nice." Black talks about the blue sky and being quiet warm. Wake shot. Below, at the nav station, Pascal talks about strategy with the approaching low, gybing during the night to get the good position, the good pressure. Difficulty of routing with the exclusion zone/ice gate. No way to get away and be safe. Tomorrow night, maybe gusting to 45 knots. Increasing wave state. He shows the routing software with the low moving through.Drone shot from ahead as AkzoNobel reaches on starboard, triple-heading. Below, Emily eats. She talks about how they're getting into the Southern Ocean. It was sunny and warm yesterday, but now that's changed. Justin getting dressed talks about the "Southern Ocean weather" coming up. Keeping in front of the front, in flat water, hopefully. But at some point "it's going to become a bit bumpy, and wet on deck." Emily talks about being nervous to see what it's going to be like. Drone shot of three sailors working on the bow, one on the bowsprit, rigging lines.Drone shot of Vestas with the sun low behind them reaching in 15 knots of wind on starboard tack. (Think this is from late in the day on 2017-12-11.) Charlie, below, talks about the race so far. The plan they had when they left was not the best one, which put them on the back foot. "We've hit the reset button in the ridge." Simon, at the nav station, says they've just had the 0700 sched, and they look pretty good. He points out their position vs. the other boats: Scallywag, TTToP, then the other pack of boats about 20 miles south. Good to be further north. In 24, 48 hours it's good to be further north. "Certainly a more seamanlike [i.e., safety-conscious] way to go about it." Charlie, below, talks about "the weather, Friday, looks pretty fresh with nowhere to run." Setting yourself to be in the right place in three days' time in 50 knots of wind is more important. Simon shows the scary low on the computer forecast. Have to be careful to not get into a position where the wind and sea state are so bad you're pushed against the ice gate and have to slow down. Charlie: "Have to watch the weather pretty closely to make sure we don't find ourselves in a bad spot." Drone shot from ahead with the sunset behind them.Dockout. Simon crouches on the rail, saying goodbye to a young boy holding a Wisdom plushie; behind a younger child with a pacifier is held by a woman. Simon: "Be good!" As Vestas pulls away from the dock they all wave to each other. Below as they motor out to the start, Simon has put on his foulies and talks to Sam about the crew, how they combine youth, experience, lots of races, people in for the first time. "For the next leg the experience is good." Threading the line between sailing fast and breaking the boat. Sam: "Do you get nervous before these legs?" (I bet Sam is nervous.) Simon: "The hanging around the dock's the most stressful part for me. Saying goodbye to the family. But once you're out here there's not much time for nerves to be honest." In the cockpit as they sail before the start under main, Stacey talks about how yeah, a little nervous, going into the Southern Ocean with the forecast. Tony says it's his tenth time going down there. Shot of just after the start as the fleet sails on starboard tack. On the foredeck, Nick wrestles with a furled sail; it appears to be hung up in the rig above him. Nick, to the back of the boat: "Keep easing!... Are you easing?" He struggles to free the sail. Nick (under his breath): "Fuck it." To the cockpit: "Somebody come up and help me." Tom runs forward to help pull on the sail. Sam is right in the action as they wrestle with the sail. Nick: "Okay! It's good! Start hoisting!" Shot of Scallywag right on their stern, diving below them, TTToP and AkzoNobel further to leeward. Chuny is steering. Scallywag comes in beneath them. Shouting back and forth between the boats. Sam is RIGHT IN THE MIDDLE OF THE ACTION, leaning out to leeward, practically touching Scallywag. We see the OBR on Scallywag (Konrad Frost) filming Sam as Sam films him. Protests. Shouts from Vestas about the overtaking leeward vessel not having rights to luff above proper course. Later, they sail in less wind, the shore visible to port. TTToP and Scallywag are visible to leeward. Chuny, on the helm, appears to still be talking about the Scallywag incident. Chuny: "I saw him (gestures) luffing against US." Slomo shot of crew reefing the main. Sam: "Hey, Chuny. What happened at the start with Scallywag?" Chuny explains the rule, that Scallywag came in from behind and started luffing, and how it's not safe, it could have broken both boats, at the start of a leg like this. "I was angry... Because it's not safe." We see them putting in a second reef. Charlie, on the aft pedestal, grinding and talking to Sam. Subtitles (added by Sam), because he's barely understandable. "Ah you know everyone puts a lot of stock in the start. But it's kind of more how you finish."Slomo shot of Carlo working the foredeck, going to weather in windy conditions on port tack. Other boats astern as they're leaving Cape Town. Bouwe, the next day, talks about the spectacle of leaving Cape Town. Talks about other boats, points them out. Abby, below, does something with a rod. Sunset shot from the first day of the boat sailing on starboard with reefed main on starboard tack. Below, Annie, below on the next morning, talks about everyone being pretty tired, it's been upwind, nearly 40 knots. Now it's dropping. She talks about the other boats. Hard, shifty conditions. Capey grinding in the pit. Carlo and Annie on the foredeck. Louis on the helm. Dongfeng sailing to leeward and abeam on port tack, about a quarter mile away. Shot of Dongfeng behind them, on their starboard quarter. Shot of MAPFRE dead ahead of them, a half mile away. Abby studying Dongfeng through binoculars. Bouwe, sitting in the cockpit, talks about how they've been sailing the boat better and better, and it's good that they're now keeping up with MAPFRE and Dongfeng. "Because they've showed some heels to us in previous legs." Drone shots of Brunel sailing in light winds, including a low-altitude shot and a shot with Dongfeng a half mile away to leeward of Brunel.Xabi, below, talks about managing to be in the front in the first 24 hours, where the competition is, waiting for the wind to pick up. Repeats the same stuff (I assume) in Spanish. In the background Sophie does something in the galley. Shot from the cabin of crew at the back of the boat in windy conditions. Slomo washing machine shots. Grinding.Nipper grinds while Annemieke calls trim. Witty explains that there was a problem with the water; too much chlorine caused a few crew to throw up. (Presumably he's kidding about seasickness.) He gestures at Tom, on the helm. "Clouty's just come on deck for the the first time since the start." Shot of another boat (Vestas?) on port on their weather quarter. Witty talks about hanging onto the leaders, should gain when the wind goes right. Two competitors ahead of them and to weather: Brunel and Dongfeng? Witty talks about how only one thing happens when you go in this direction: It goes nuclear. Below, Antonio eats while looking at the computer. He says to Konrad: "I managed to eat something properly. Gaining my sea legs. It's good." He puts on his foulies. Talks about the big transition coming in three hours' time. Grinding on deck. AkzoNobel crosses behind them. Parko talks about their preparation on shore. Witty, with AkzoNobel continuing on port behind them while they stay on starboard, talks about the good prep from their shore team for the current wind condition. Witty: "Being a little more proactive witih our decisions rather than reactive. I'm sure we'll get it wrong soon, but it seems to be working at the moment."Lucas explains that they had a vane come off their wind sensor and Liz had to go aloft to fix it. He talks about how it's a lovely day and he's working on his tan for Melbourne. Dee talks about having a cup of tea on deck. Drone shots of Liz at the masthead. GoPro shots of her going up, at the mast. Back on deck, Liz says, "I just needed some alone time. It's the only place you can be by yourself on the boat." Below, Bleddyn shows the damaged windvane. More drone shots.Shooting through the cockpit railing under gray skies, we see a bunch of competitors on AzkoNobel's weather quarter. Left to right I think they might be Brunel, Dongfeng, MAPFRE, and more distant maybe Vestas? Then we see a shot of Simeon working on the pit winch with Scallywag ahead of and to leeward of them. Simeon looks up at the slot to check sailtrim. He talks to James about not doing too well at the start: "We need to practice those ones." Talks about being close to the fleet, the wind being up/down/left/right. Justin, on the helm, talks about wind pressure. We see Scallywag, on starboard under the MH0, crossing them while Brad goes to go out on the bowsprit. Nicho, in the cockpit, talks about the contrast during the night of being in almost 40 knots, then getting flat sees and "almost nice sailing again." He talks about the 40 knot conditions being uncomfortable; slamming and worrying about breakage. Martine talks about getting stuck in a hole and passed. Nicolai talks about the first 24 hours being pretty good, intense, hunting and almost back where they want to be. Nicho talks about getting to the new wind and tacking, and then waiting for the front to get there. We see the feet of someone on the helm putting on their boots.Dongfeng slats in light winds. Carolijn calls as someone else pulls in a line: "3, 2, 1, okay; hold furl." Charles, sitting at a winch, says something about using the "masthead upwind" (MH0?). The crew trims the MH0 in light winds. Charles, holding the main steady by hanging onto a thin cable under the boom, talks about having to cross a ridge, a position in high pressure between two winds. Trying to catch the low pressure in the south. Always difficult. "The wind is very shifty, very light, but we are lucky because the system is moving in the right direction." Drone shot of Dongfeng sailing upwind on starboard under the MH0 with another boat (I think Brunel around 2017.12.11 09:55:35 UTC) behind and to weather of them. As the drone circles htem another boat is barely visible further away behind and to leeward of them; I think that's Scallywag. As the shot continues we see Jack going up the mast. He reaches the masthead and the camera circles him, showing the two boats shown before and then showing another boat ahead of them (MAPFRE, then the lead boat). On deck, Jack explains that in the big winds the day before part of the wind sensor unit at the masthead blew off, so he was up there replacing it. "There's not much wind but we're right into the swell. On deck it feels really flat but when you get up there it's exaggerated by a lot. Feels like you're gonna get thrown off every three seconds. Bear-hugging it the whole time. It's really not fun. Nearly got it done."Bleddyn is on the helm under gray skies and what appear to be light winds. He talks about the hype about what's going to happen in 2 days time. Light and tricky at the moment, with a bit of sea state. More breeze and big waves in 2 days. Martin talks about mixed feelings about being in the Southern Ocean. "Good and bad memories. Very tough, cold, and wet... The best advice is to stay dry and warm." Drone shots of TTToP sailing upwind on port tack with the J1 and full main. Onboard shot as they sail upwind of Vestas ahead and to leeward a few miles away. Shots of crew in the cockpit; Martin on the grinder, Bleddyn on the helm.Docking out; waving to the shore. The start, with other boats converging on them from the weather side. Pablo on the helm; Sophie on the grinder as they interact with Brunel just below them. Someone (Blair?) calls out: "Come down, come down!" Shot of them overtaking Vestas from astern and to weather. Sophie holds a protest flag up; Brunel's bow is visible to weather. Vestas to leeward. Slomo of going to weather on port tack. Slomo of Sophie and someone else (Joan?) grinding on the aft pedestal. Dongfeng unfurling their FR0 (or J0?) to weather of them. Below, his face in shadow, Xabi talks about the leg so far. Good start around the triangle, now going upwind in almost 40 knots. "Right now we're fighting hard with Dongfeng and Brunel so we're very happy." Slomo of Támara in the cockpit cringing away from spray. Slomo of spray curling over crew in the cockpit, backlit by the sunset. Below, Xabi talks about how well the crew is doing so far. Cold and windy, but it's going to be like that for the next two weeks. Slomo spray on deck, double(?)-reefed main, Cape of Good Hope (?) in the distance. Below, Pablo leans against a bag labeled SURVIVAL SUITS, sleeping.Kevin (yay!) on the deckhouse gathers the main as they reef it. Below, Marie talks to Kevin while Jack puts on his foulie top. Kevin, to Martin: "Good weather to be back. Good weather to start the new leg." Talks about strategy. "We are the first to tack to be back inshore... Second place, I think. Just in front of MAPFRE and just behind Brunel." He talks about how they have 35 knots of wind, which you can hear howling in the rigging. Says it should decrease all night, and a reach tomorrow morning. He goes on deck. Marie, below, talks about the conditions. Sunny, should have a good sunset with the Cape of Good Hope, a bit bumpy. "I had last night a filet of beef with french fries. It was awesome." Talks about the good fresh food they still have. PBJ. Sunset behind them. See them coming in toward shore beating on starboard tack, shifting the stack to leeward in preparation for tacking. MAPFRE ducks them on port SUPER close; whoa! Slomo of the duck. Below, Fabien changes out of his foulies, talks wiht Martin about how he's completely wet. Up to 40 knots at times, he says.Docking out. Liz on the helm. "Lot's of people." Footage of the start, other boats, with no audio. They race the inshore course, again with no audio. Dee steering; Francesca trimming the main. Bleddyn, on the rail, grimaces and then hikes out. Bianca works the pit. "Yeah; I'm on the lock!" Martin takes spray in the face. Liz, on the pedestal, makes a shaka sign and high-fives Dee on the helm. Martin grinds; shades his eyes to look up at the slot.Simeon walks along the side of the boat, shaking hands with shore crew standing on the dock. Motoring out, Brad talks about how funny it is to be talking to lots of people on Facebook, on shore, and then leaving and realizing it's just the 10 of you for the next few weeks." Nicho, standing on the stern, talks about leaving. "Not nervous. But quite motivated, to take this thing on. This is a big leg, a double-point leg... It's a high-wind, high-risk, high-speed leg." The start; other boats. Scallywag dives below them from astern. Footage of them going very slowly in light wind. Someone (Nicho?) talks about getting the FR0 stowed. Nicolai on the helm as they sail fast on port tack. Nicho talks about them getting stuck in a light patch and the boats inshore getting away from them. "Long, long way to go yet." Slomo grinding.Scallywag crew walks through the crowd during the dockout ceremony. Slomo of Fish hugging a young man/boy (son?) across the lifelines. Someone (António?) says goodbye to a toddler (son?) behind held by a woman. The boy holds a Wisdom plushie, inadvertently bopping the woman holding him (mom?) in the nose. Parko side-hugs a girl (daughter?). Witty at the helm takes them out from the dock with crowds visible behind them. Motoring out, Witty talks about double points on this leg. "We Scallywags need a podium on this leg into Melbourne, which would be nice." Talks about the wind on this leg. Standing by the mast as they motor out, Alex talks about being a bit nervous. It's his first Southern Ocean leg. "The race doesn't start here. It starts tonight." Parko, in the pit: "This is an important two miles out of 6,000. So it's just about sailing smart." We see the start, with all the other boats to leeward of them. Close action. Ben, on the bow, moving a sail.Dee, on the helm as they motor out, talks about going into the Southern Ocean, forecast for breeze. Francesca, trimming the main after the start, talks about the start. "We are close to the first, so that's perfect." Frederico talks while standing at the grinder (not sure what he's talking about). "But I start and it's all good now." MAPFRE is visible ahead and to leeward of them.Onboard before the start, Louis talks about being excited to be back in the race and looking forward to the Southern Ocean. Abby talks about how they've already got 30 knots, and they're all geared up for a night of slamming, banging in a big breeze. Footage of the start, racing around the buoys in close proximity to the other boats. Video has a glitch, with the video freezing at 1:00 while the sound continues, then sound drops out and we just see the frozen video frame for the last 48 seconds of the video.On-board footage of the start of Leg 3 from onboard Dongfeng. Epic footage of close-quarters racing with the other boats in a building wind.