Carolijn Brouwer / Dongfeng Race Team

gender Female
Carolijn, below, makes and eats a meal. "I'm eating the big boy cereal, specially made by Neal. Lots of granola and nuts and dried fruit." Talks about bad sea state 16/18 hours ago. MAPFRE right next to them. Fun racing. Jérémie eats. "Chinese breakfast... Quick to cook." Talks about being close to MAPFRE, concentrating while driving on being fast. A very close battle. Interesting, but a bit exhausting at times." Charles, at the nav station, talks about MAPFRE. Boats staying together to cross the doldrums. "Lots of boats are following us. Every time we change a bit our heading they change. But today we don't know where to go because we have no forecast... We are using the forecast from the start... Now we have the forecast, and can see we are in a good position."Lowering the J1 inside the newly hoisted J0. Watch change below; Daryl eating. Marie, below, recaps: "Finally we did lots of maneuvers. We don't have this much wind last night. The sea state was okay." Next night will be a bit more difficult. Wind to increase soon, so she needs to eat to get more energy. Shot of her putting on her foulie jacket on deck. Pascal on the helm during a sail change. They bear away with the large headsail flagging; not sure what that's about. Black and Carolijn talk in the cockpit. Kevin on the helm. Carolijn talks about the whole fleet being together. Whole fleet hanging together. They just cracked off. Trying to do their jobs, not make mistakes. A long leg; keeping everything together. Looking at the next 2 weeks.Sunrise shot of the stern. Carolijn on the stern. Franck, on the stern, explains where the competitors are. Having to deal with the wind shadow of Taiwan. And will have to deal with the finish into Hong Kong. Kevin on the helm with Horace trimming and Carolijn on the pedestal. She's looking forward to arriving in Hong Kong and seeing her son Kyle. And seeing the rest of the Dongfeng family again. She says a phrase in Cantonese, with a small correction from Horace. Horace talks about how his sailing dreams started in Hong Kong. Met the person who gave him the chance to learn professional sailing, and gave him a chance to join the biggest race in the world. And he thinks his famiily will be there. Will fight until the end. Daryl says he's looking forward to seeing his family in Hong Kong. Jack is looking forward to seeing the team, and his girlfriend. It's a cool place he hasn't been to.Shots of them sailing fast on starboard gybe. Winch, washing machine. Charles smiling on the helm. Carolijn trimming. Below, Frank says, "The plan is a long, downwind, starboard gybe with some wind variation." Sometimes an opportunity to gybe to position the boat for the next shift. When they pass Taiwan there will be a big wind shadow; have to anticipate that. Not easy to attack the boats in front. They have better wind. Shots of a gybe from starboard to port, then another gybe from port to starboard. Crew working in the cockpit.Horace, below with Carolijn, talks about teaching her Cantonese. They take turns speaking Cantonese. It's kind of adorable.Rain pounds down with light winds. Carolijn in the rain. Franck, and everyone else, looks off to port. Franck talks in French. Camera pans forward to show a rainstorm; ahead of it is a competitor several miles away (probably AkzoNobel, but possibly Vestas). They tack the MH0. More rain. Shifting the stack in the rain. Sailing on port tack with the MH0 after the rain has stopped. Horace, on the bow with no wind, gives a recap. [Interesting that no headsail is visible forward of him. J1 is on deck, and the sail on the bowsprit appears to be furled. Are they bare-headed? using the J2 or J3 as a windseeker? Oh; I bet that's the MH0 on the bowsprit, and it's partially furled to make it a little windseeker, with the unfurled part invisible above him, out of the frame.] At one point a competitor is visible, out of focus, behind him. Again, probably AkzoNobel. Justine, on the bow, recaps the strategic situation. Closer to AkzoNobel, but Vestas, sadly, is a little further ahead. Shot of AkzoNobel. Sailing at 8 knots with dolphins under the bow. Then, flopping again. Franck, in the companionway, talks about strategy in the doldrums; picking the right side of the cloud, getting the wind. Now wind is down, but he's hoping to get into the tradewinds tomorrow morning. Carolijn steering at sunset. Jack sleeping in the bow. Dusk. Horace asks about Vestas' wind in the latest sched, the other competitors; Franck explains.Opens with a view of the mast instruments: Boatspeed 12.8 knots, woo! Looks like this is early evening. Drone shot from slightly earlier with sunset. Horace gives Carolijn Chinese lessons in the cockpit; says he's going to teach her some Cantonese words for Hong Kong. Carolijn: "I like learning languages. I already speak 6 languages, and I'm trying to learn a 7th language, Chinese Mandarin." She talks about cultural differences. Hates being somewhere and not being able to communicate. "There's always something to learn." Sunset clouds.Kevin, on the helm, whistles some music. Martin guesses the name; Kevin points his thumb at him. "He got it." Carolijn asks what it is; I think Kevin says Claire de Lune? But he translates into English at Carolijn's request as "the sound of the moon" rather than "the light of the moon"? I dunno. Guess it kind of sounds like Debussey. Maybe it's something else. Carolijn's turn. She laughs at her inept whistling. She asks Jérémie is he's a good whistler. Jérémie: No. Kevin whistles again: L'amour est un oiseau rebelle (Habanera) from Carmen. These European folk are so damn cultured! (I did recognize this one, though, despite being an ugly American.) Ima favorite this one, just because it's so cool how they're hanging out at the front of the fleet, just chillin'. Reminds me of that scene in The Natural when the team's firing on all cylinders and Pop and Red are sitting in the dugout playing basically the same game.Martin manufactures a story by asking all the crew what they'd like to be if they couldn't be a sailor. Carolijn: A pilot. Horace: A coach, a sailing coach, teaching young Chinese sailors, sharing his experience. Carolijn: A pilot, not just flying people around, but something in the military or research. The navigational side is not dissimilar to what they do on the water, and she finds it interesting. Jack: Mountain climber. But hard to make a career out of. Growing up liked engineering. Kevin: A rugby player. But getting too old for that now. "A clever guy." Daryl: "I wanted to be an aviation engineer, but sailing got in the way of that. Probably better off for it." Justine: Teacher.Below, Kevin talks about being tired. "With my watch partner Carolijn Brouwer we have been 12 hours on deck - 14, 2 more. Lots of gybes along the ice limit. Now we are getting more pressure, sea state." Now 2 hours of rest before being back on deck, then one very important gybe before heading north for Australia. Carolijn: "I think I have to admit I'm pretty tired now. All the action on deck seems to happen when Kevin and I are off watch. But it's part of the job and you ahve to get it done. It's part of the race." In the Southern Ocean it's harder because of getting dressed and undressed. "When you do that every 2 hours it gets a bit frustrating. In other legs it's much less a problem... There's a lot more layers coming on than otherwise.... Have to push really hard. The guys on MAPFRE have done really well." Fabien talks in French. Black talks about normal life on board. Having to be ready. Eating a lot of food with no rice (?). Pascal talks in French.Pascal, at the nav station, puts on a headset. He announces something we hear booming through a PA system. "20 minutes before the gybe. 20 minutes." Jack, waking up in his bunk. Carolijn and Black getting dressed. Marie getting dressed. Pascal over the PA: "Three minutes." Crew goes on deck, perfoms the gybe. Below, we see Marie climbing back into her bunk. Pascal, over the PA: "Okay; in about 20 minutes [?] another gybe." Time lapse shot of repeated gybes with short intervals between them.Slomo shot of waves through the wheel. Interesting slowed-down audio. An albatross flies by. Slomo grinding. Slomo faces; Carolijn on the helm. Slomo trimming. Below, Carolijn takes off her gear. She talks to Martin; behind Fabien is making food in the galley. Carolijn: "Yes, it's painful. Not necessarily painful, it's just tough. It's very tiring. You get to a certain stage where you're so tired that you start tripping over your own feet. If you don't watch out it can be quite dangerous." Talks about even 20 minutes lying down in your bunk, even if you don't sleep, helps you get the energy to make the next gybe. "I've lost count. I don't even know if we're halfway yet. Just in the last 3 hours of my off watch we've done 6 gybes?... Entertaining stuff." Fabien eats with a bit of a 1,000-yard stare. (Looking at the tracker through this section it's been brutal; Dongfeng and MAPFRE are at the front of the fleet within AIS range of each other having a running gybing battle to see who can stay closer to the exclusion zone.) Pascal, below, drops his head and rubs it. Looks tired. We pull back and see he's watching Charles at the nav station from his bunk. Charles talks to Martin: "It's very simple. During 30 hours we're having to gybe every hour so it's a nightmare. Not very funny but we have no choice. We have the ice limit for a good reason... You have to stack every time, 600 kilos each time... You don't manage to sleep... That's life at the extreme for sure. On the positive side, we are ahead with MAPFRE and fighting for the first place, so it's good."Low-elevation wake shot of Dongfeng's stern, surfing fast. Jack on the helm surfing on port gybe in strong winds with a full main. Caroline, standing between the wheels, explains the situation: Typical of Southern Ocean, where you have a lot of clouds: white, gray, and black. Ahead of them now is a very dark gray cloud, and Pascal from the nav station has confirmed it from radar. So they need to keep an eye on it, in case it comes toward them or they overtake it. So Kevin is now preparing for a reef. Squalls like that can have 10-20 knots more wind. 20-odd knots now, so that would push them into 40s. Want to reef BEFORE the 40 knots, not in it. "It's a fun little game; it keeps us busy." Shots of them sailing into darker skies, triple-heading with a full main. Kevin grinding the forward pedestal.Below, closeup of a toolbag. Jack repairs something. He explains that in the current light conditions they've been doing repairs. Went up the rig, did some repair work on the water system. "Making the boat as sorted and safe as possible, then we hang on for the next 24 hours I think." Shot on deck of Kevin preparing to go aloft, then him up the mast checking the rigging. Shot of gear below. Carolijn and Kevn talking. Carolijn puts on a helmet. Kevin demonstrates the faceplate on the helmet to Martin. Kevin: "It's more for comfort than safety. So you can hide behind the glass." Carolijn and Kevin discuss his modifications to the helmet. Marie prepares food in the galley. Marie: "I think it's good to eat before the storm. I have a good rest and now I will have a good dinner, beef and potato. And let's go." Marie eating.Dongfeng slats in light winds. Carolijn calls as someone else pulls in a line: "3, 2, 1, okay; hold furl." Charles, sitting at a winch, says something about using the "masthead upwind" (MH0?). The crew trims the MH0 in light winds. Charles, holding the main steady by hanging onto a thin cable under the boom, talks about having to cross a ridge, a position in high pressure between two winds. Trying to catch the low pressure in the south. Always difficult. "The wind is very shifty, very light, but we are lucky because the system is moving in the right direction." Drone shot of Dongfeng sailing upwind on starboard under the MH0 with another boat (I think Brunel around 2017.12.11 09:55:35 UTC) behind and to weather of them. As the drone circles htem another boat is barely visible further away behind and to leeward of them; I think that's Scallywag. As the shot continues we see Jack going up the mast. He reaches the masthead and the camera circles him, showing the two boats shown before and then showing another boat ahead of them (MAPFRE, then the lead boat). On deck, Jack explains that in the big winds the day before part of the wind sensor unit at the masthead blew off, so he was up there replacing it. "There's not much wind but we're right into the swell. On deck it feels really flat but when you get up there it's exaggerated by a lot. Feels like you're gonna get thrown off every three seconds. Bear-hugging it the whole time. It's really not fun. Nearly got it done."In the cockpit, Charles talks in French. Below, Stu talks about how obviously they're pretty disappointed to have fallen behind from the controlling position, but hard work has gotten them back into it. "Got a real race on our hands with Vestas, who are just a few miles behind us. And MAPFRE, a decent chunk ahead but certainly not out of touch." Charles talks about Table Mountain, and its effect on the wind. Carolijn, below: "When everything's against us is when we get the best out of ourselves and push really hard. Marie: "As Pascal [said], we have to be faster and lower." Stu: "We have to remain positive and keep chipping away." Slomo shots of the cockpit, washing machine. Darryl laughing at the pedestal, on the bow. Wake. Below, a loud sound of a sheet being eased. Stu: "A minor wind check; nothing to be concerned about." mast cam view of the deck, spray.On deck, Carolijn, Stu, Horace talk about their favorite and least-favorite on-board foods. Carolijn, grinding with Horace, talks about contraband. Stu: "I would actually say some of these meals I would order if I were out at a restaurant. They are actually that good." Below, Stu prepares food in the galley and eats it. Horace pulls out a packet of Chinese food. He points to it. "Every day... Where's my Chinese food?" Jérémie eats. Horace eats. Horace: "I never want to see this one again."Pascal talks in the cockpit. They're off Brazil, can't see the girls on the beach but they're there. Talks about going around the St. Helena high. Below, at the nav station, Pascal talks on the intercom about the latest sched. Time-lapse view from the media station looking forward of Pascal at the nav station. Shots of Dongfeng reaching fast on port. Jack working on a piece of hardward (roller fitting from the head of a sail, maybe?). Jérémie, on the pedestal, slaps the top of the winch drum while spray covers him, then grabs a winch handle to bang on it. Carolijn in the washing machine. Charles grinding on a pedestal.Stu plays King Neptune. Carolijn assists as Jack is inducted.Closeup of chart plotter: We see the equator crossing. We see Jack on the aft pedestal and Carolijn in the hatchway prepping King Neptune's trident.Slomo shots: Jack grinding in the washing machine as water drips from his hat. Compass and spray. Horace in a foul-weather-gear cowl. Spray coming over the cocpit. Stu in the spray. Three egrets flying alongside Dongfeng. Below, Charles takes out a food pack from a storage locker. Jérémie says something to him in French; Charles answers and they both laugh. Shots of the food (some special treat?), Charles calls out the hatch to the cockpit: "I went to the bakery this morning!" The food being shared around among the crew in the cockpit. Charles, a nav station: "It's always good to have a sweet, a surprise." Talks about being in a tough battle, warming conditions, sweat. Charles showering in spray on deck, then rinsing off below wiht water from the galley. Carolijn in her bunk: "Twenty days is too long without a wash... I've just washed my neck, hair; it's nice."Carolijn, on deck in foulies, gives a thumbs up. Carolijn, below: "I'm lucky enough to be on watch with Stu Bannatyne, AKA 'Magic Stu'. When it's heavy weather downwind sailing, that's the man you want on the wheel. He's doing over-hours for the last couple of days. But the boat just smokes when he's driving." Shots of Stu on deck, slomo of Stu on the wheel. Stu, below, as Carolijn and SiFi take off the foulies in the background: "There's definitely a bit of technique to driving well in heavy airs, especially at night. It's mostly about trying to be accurate, small movements. A bit like trying to drive a car when you're fast. Just try to use very small movements of the wheel... At night might use stars if there's any around to help keep the boat going straight, otherwise it's just a bit of a feel for it, keeping a steady heel angle, and not being afraid to push the boat hard to keep it going fast." Shots of Stu on the wheel at night, slowmo of him being hit with spray at the wheel. Charles, below: "I wanted someone with experience going south. This guy did it eight times, the Volvo Ocean Race. He's probably one of the guys in the world who has raced more in the Southern Ocean. There aren't so much people have a lot of expeirence in this part of the world. I think it's because he spends hours and hours pushing the boat in eight Volvos, and this is the best school to learn in. In France we come from singlehanded sailing, we don't drive so much; we have autopilots, so we can go fast with the pilots but for sure we don't drive enough. This guy has made eight Volvos since he was a kid; probably one of the guys in the world to have much hour driving fast in big waves. That's why he's so strong." Slomo of Stu at the wheel.Stu on the helm as Dongfeng sails fast on starboard gybe around sunrise. Below, Carolijn climbs down through the hatch and takes off her facemask. Later, she stirs her insulated bowl with steam coming out of it. It's a cool shot; she looks like she's been out in it, and is just having a quiet moment to catch her breath. Carolijn: "It's quite nice that every race whether in port or leg we've done so far we've finished on the podium, which is a good start. 'Cause it's a bloody long race and we've got 8 more months to go, 10 more legs to go. To start with a third place is not a bad start... We've gotta keep working hard from here and keep doing what we're doing. We sailed out of Lisbon in good shape and showed everyone that we can be fast in those conditions, and just need to keep doing the same. So yeah; happy with how we're doing so far."On deck at night, Horace chants the cadence on shifting a sail on the stack. Horace: "One, two, move!" Carolijn coils a line in preparation for the gybe. Helmsman (Charles?) reaches through the wheel to activate the keel control, and the engine starts to power the hydraulics. The boat turns to port, heels to starboard, and the main comes across as the crew grinds on the pedestal. Per the tracker, this is the gybe they made at 0136 UTC. Carolijn: "The windward sheet's really tight, eh?" Below, Marie talks to Jérémie: "It was a windy start of the leg, but now it's 25 [knots of wind]; it's fine. We are happy but we are... more focused to do a good job of safe things on board. So it's better; it's relax."Sunrise. Carolijn: "We have come from very far. We have fought really hard to get where we are. So I think we should be happy with a third place. It's a little early to say; it's not over till it's over." Horace: "We still working hard to catch MAPFRE and Vestas." Jack: "We've been at the very bad bit. Hopefully we can stay here or get further ahead." Sunrise. Charles talks below about wishing the race committee would shorten the course to avoid having to sail in the very light conditions at the end. Someone (Horace?) working on the outrigger. Jérémie on the helm.Carolijn: "We're a bit like pirates, a like spies. We keep a check on each other." Carolijn looks through binoculars at AkzoNobel in the distance, then Pascal does the same.Shot out the companionway as Dongfeng goes to weather on starboard in 15 knots of wind. Carolijn on the helm; Jack leans on the grinder pedestal. Charles, at the nav station, gives a position report (I think?) over a microphone to the cockpit. Horace, getting his foulies on below: "It's getting exciting. We are getting closer to the top three boats, and AkzoNobel is visible in the AIS area... We still have 20 hours until we are arriving in Lisbon. So... we are working hard." Above, Horace stands on the outrigger rigged at the shrouds, doing something to the clew of the J2 (?). Richard: "Smile!" Horace makes the "shaka" gesture. Jérémie on the helm, talks to Charles in French via the intercom, while Stu listens from the grinder handles. Horace works on the stack.Stu: "Clear sky on that side of the cloud." Charles: "But it looks more windy here than here, no?" Someone off camera (Charles? Pascal?): "Starboard is going to be a nightmare." Carolijn: "Painful." Stu (disgusted): "Fuck." Horace moving the stack forward. Carolijn: "The wind's just gone ligher on us... Could be an option to gybe out and split from the fleet. But at the same time the wind's very right at the moment. We've decided we're going to stick with the fleet and see what the pressure's going to do ahead of us." Sounds like maybe Stu was advocating for gybing onto starboard, but Charles overruled. (Per tracker, most of the fleet did end up gybing onto starboard while Dongfeng and Mapfre continued longer on port. Those that gybed earlier did better, leading to Dongfeng entering the Strait of Gibralter in last place.)