Emily Nagel / Team AkzoNobel

gender Female
Drone shot alongside as AkzoNobel sails in 15 knots of wind. Looks like they have a J0 and J3 up; MH0 and J2 (maybe?) are up but furled. Maybe shifting gears in expectation of falling wind? Brad goes out to the MH0 clew to take the lazy sheet off. Nicho talks about them expecting lighter winds as they approach the Irish coast. Beautiful drone shot with grassy hillside in the foreground and AkzoNobel and two other competitors (TTToP and Vestas, I think, from the tracker) behind them approaching the coast. Jules talks strategy in the cockpit. Jules: It's pretty rugged, and the water's pretty fresh and clean, and there's lots of granite that's been weathered by lots of storms, so there's lots of caves and arches. Drone shot flying through a sea cave (!) with AkzoNobel visible beyond. Then another shot of a small opening in the rock with a red-sailed boat (MAPFRE?) beyond. Jules: Pretty green because it rains a lot. And there's lots of good pubs. That's why I like it. He talks about the fleet, and compression; first 6 boats all within 3-5 miles of each other. Emily: Quite cool to see the geography of Ireland. Usually the wather's bad so you don't see it that much. Justin on the bow with Fastnet rock behind him. Drone shot with ridge and AkzoNobel beyone. Nicho: third or fourth at the moment; same as we are overall. Way forward for us to score as high up as possible, but certainly conditions ahead could have boats doing damage. We need a little of that to help us get on the podium overall. Just keep pushing the boat and sailing as quick as we can.High drone shot of AkzoNobel sailing in light conditions. Trimming. Slomo of Martine and Emily on the bow. RIB drives alongside; Justin waves to them from the helm. Justin stacking forward. Sunset. Justin: Whole leaderboard got reversed... Can just see Dongfeng on the bow. Plastics and Scallywag forward and to leeward. Luckly Vestas is behind us. That's always a bonus. Doing 11/12 knots toward Fastnet Rock. Good for the progress toward the finish, but not so good for the leaderboard. Drone shot of AkzoNobel sailing toward the sunset in flat conditions.Drone shot of AkzoNobel on a glassy sea. Someone (Nicolai? Nico?) looks through binoculars as Konrad films him. "I feel like someone's watching me." Emily, on the bow: Hopefully within the last 24 hours. Brunel is just over there (she points to starboard). We see a drone shot with AkzoNobel in the foreground and Brunel ahead and to starboard of them. ...about 2 miles away. Wind is going to be up and down, not a lot of sleep, a lot of tacks and sail changes. Overhead drone shot. Sail change. Martine: We're not in a great position right now, but overall still good. In a good position with the fleet, and with a 24-hour record. But Brunel is the closest boat to us on the scoreboard. Stacking forward. Martine: Right now we're focusing a lot on Brunel, but we have to be protective of the fleet. Drone shot.Flopping in glassy, lumpy conditions. On bow, Emily jokes about how they're no longer going for the 24-hour speed record. It's weird to think that a day ago she was wearing her crash helmet. Though she could use it now to not be hit by the (flopping) foot of the jib. Simeon, on the bow: Quite radical, from some pretty good conditions to basically nothing now. Clouds. Bouwe is right next to us. We see Brunel a few miles away. Justin: It's actually quite pleasant. And everyone's getting it (i.e., the other boats are stopped too). On the helm, Nicolai: It's not too bad. We've been in it before... You can't stress about it. You're not going to go any faster if you hoist every sail on the boat. Have a cup of tea and go again tomorrow when the breeze fills in. Pretty sure no matter what happens, Bouwe's not going to do 600 miles in 24 hours. I'll take that.Low-alttiude drone shot. Nicolai: It's all about the last 24 hours. We're coming in fresh. Just go around them. Drone shot from above. Emiily: Passing by Bermuda. Which I think everyone knows by now is where I'm from, because I've been talking about it all week. I haven't been home for a year. So it's pretty cool for me to pass by. Give a wave. Simeon: During the watch we'll come into lighter pressure in the high. Once we sort of 90 degrees with the high pressure we've gotta gybe off. It will be tomorrow before we do that gybe. Drone shot.Wet shots on the foredeck: Luke and Simeon rigging for a sail change. Justin and Emily in the pit. Luke at the clew. Brad: Just left the doldrums, but it was harsh on us. Coughed up quite a few miles to the other boats. A little down at the moment, but we'll be back up. Now we're in 15-20 knots, tight reaching. Nicolai, below, eats something tubular. "Maybe not. Put that back." He wraps it up. He talks to Emily in the bunk above him about food.Drone shot of AkzoNobel going through sargasso. "Massive patch to leeward." Emily: Just crossed the equator and have just gotten into the Sargasso Sea. Brad, below, shows the endoscope. Underwater shot of Brad flossing the rudder. Jules: The only way to get it off is to physically stop the boat and make the boat sail in reverse. Drone shot of them doing a backdown.Simeon: Have been 70% of the way around the world, and haven't seen any wildlife. Just a few random dolphins. 12 or 13 years ago I remember a lot more; orcas, big whales... I don't know, it's the time of year or could be we need to find a biologist and get a proper explanation. Nicho, on the helm: You always hope it's better than it is, but the impact... The difference is quite scary. In certain areas you'd see schools of dolphins, 200, 300 of them. Albatrosses, dozens of them circling the boat in the Southern Ocean. This time it's been scary how little. Martine: 15,000 miles of sailing, and haven't seen... Nicho: It is a worry. Hopefully up here in the Gulf Stream we'll see rapid improvement. Nicolai: Main reason most of us do this race is to see the world, see wildlife, see the cities. But seeing pollution is dramatic. Hopefully we can turn the tide. Martine: Talks about the loss of wildlife. Emily: This is how nature resets itself. Probably won't happen in our lifetime. Seeing a huge decline in animals on land and out here. We're messing up, bigtime.Luke, on the pedestal: Had a good sched, back in the hunt. Tradewinds on the other side of these clouds. Taking off the miles; everyone's happy on board. Emily: We were gybing every hour. Have to make a go of it. As much coffee as you can take. Brad, on the mainsheet, talks about the transitions. Jules, in the hatch, talks about this gybe vs the other gybe. Windier conditions with spray coming over the bow.Time lapse of the cockpit from the stern at night. Jules, at the nav station, explains that they're trying to negotiate some current, but didn't do as well as the boats ahead of them. Emily, below, sprays water on herself. Jules: Using larger sails, VMG running. Less concerned about the current, more about the clouds. Unstable wind; lots of rain.Nicho, on deck: We're halfway through our gas. He explains: heating gas. "She's high." Martine explains. Emily goes to check. Emily: I told people not to change so I could keep track." Emily counts bottles, she calls up: We've got 8 full bottles left. "False alarm." Martine is relieved.Time lapse of the cabin below. Nicolai: We're not going so well this morning. We're reshuffling the weight of the boat. It's quite painful when you're losing. Simeon on the helm; Luke crossing the cockpit in slomo. Emily looks through binoculars at a competitor on their port side. Luke: Have been struggling. Breeze is shifty and up and down. "It's not the easiest sailing, and we haven't been doing it particularly well... Put it down to learning I guess."Something going on below. Nicho: "No, it's loose." (Keel inspection?) Justin talks about how other boats sailed away from them, except for Vestas. Not sure why. Tried everything. "We wait until dark and then we pull our moves out." Sunset. Emily says the start of the leg was quite nice. A bit frustrating, but nice to be back on the water. Drone shot circling AkzoNobel in the sunset.Spreader cam view of AkzoNobel surfing and stuffing the bow. Below, Simeon recaps the last 48 hours; busy, gybing, changing sails. 2000 miles to Cape Horn. Point Nemo. Brad: Talks about Point Nemo and the space station. Simeon: What to ask the astronaughts on the space station? Emily wonders if it's easier to go to the toilet on the space station than it is on a Volvo boat. Luke: Jealous. Their stacking technique must be far superior to ours. Simeon: what they have for dinner. Nicolas: They go to the toilet like we do, they eat freeze-dried like we do, they don't sleep much, have a pretty cool view. So I pretty much see myself as an astronaut these days. Simeon: Must be a pretty impressive view. We have an impressive view of the ocean, and of the stars when the clouds let them through. But their view must be even better. Stern cam view of Martine on the pedestal as they surf.Charles, at nav station: In 30 hours we'll enter very strong conditions. Can't carry the fractional in those conditions, so will need to work out good sail combination. Goal is not to break the boat. A very tough leg. Strong wind, and full downwind with many gybes. I do have stress of course. Because you have the responsibility of the people and the boat. But you still want to fight for the first place. It's a balance between speed and safety. When we have 40 knots we know what sail to use. But then we have a gust to 55, and we have to react. But that's part of the Volvo Ocean Race. Horace talks below in Mandarin. Pascal, at nav station, talks in French while demonstrating something involving chart/routing software.Spreader cam view of AkzoNobel surfing and stuffing the bow. Below, Simeon recaps the last 48 hours; busy, gybing, changing sails. 2000 miles to Cape Horn. Point Nemo. Brad: Talks about Point Nemo and the space station. Simeon: What to ask the astronaughts on the space station? Emily wonders if it's easier to go to the toilet on the space station than it is on a Volvo boat. Luke: Jealous. Their stacking technique must be far superior to ours. Simeon: what they have for dinner. Nicolas: They go to the toilet like we do, they eat freeze-dried like we do, they don't sleep much, have a pretty cool view. So I pretty much see myself as an astronaut these days. Simeon: Must be a pretty impressive view. We have an impressive view of the ocean, and of the stars when the clouds let them through. But their view must be even better. Stern cam view of Martine on the pedestal as they surf.Charles, at nav station: In 30 hours we'll enter very strong conditions. Can't carry the fractional in those conditions, so will need to work out good sail combination. Goal is not to break the boat. A very tough leg. Strong wind, and full downwind with many gybes. I do have stress of course. Because you have the responsibility of the people and the boat. But you still want to fight for the first place. It's a balance between speed and safety. When we have 40 knots we know what sail to use. But then we have a gust to 55, and we have to react. But that's part of the Volvo Ocean Race. Horace talks below in Mandarin. Pascal, at nav station, talks in French while demonstrating something involving chart/routing software.Luke, below: First night at sea seemed long, bashing upwind, tacking, not a lot of sleep. But East Cape in a few hours and then downwind and an end to tacking. Someone calls from the companionway to the cockpit: "We should be crossing them". Nicho on deck with two boats to leeward. Chipping away; not sure if we're any faster. Brunel crosses behind them. Luke, Emily, and Brad getting dressed below. Luke: About to go around East Cape, in joint third position with Brunel. Looking forward to a few days on port tack heading south toward the Southern Ocean. Brad eating. Had an hour and half of good sleep. Emily: Nah, had a full 12 hours of beauty sleep. You can tell by the hair, and always so charming. Brunel and TTToP sailing to leeward.Luke, below: First night at sea seemed long, bashing upwind, tacking, not a lot of sleep. But East Cape in a few hours and then downwind and an end to tacking. Someone calls from the companionway to the cockpit: "We should be crossing them". Nicho on deck with two boats to leeward. Chipping away; not sure if we're any faster. Brunel crosses behind them. Luke, Emily, and Brad getting dressed below. Luke: About to go around East Cape, in joint third position with Brunel. Looking forward to a few days on port tack heading south toward the Southern Ocean. Brad eating. Had an hour and half of good sleep. Emily: Nah, had a full 12 hours of beauty sleep. You can tell by the hair, and always so charming. Brunel and TTToP sailing to leeward.Emily steers while wearing reindeer antlers. Beow, brad listens through earbuds as he inventories gear (?) in the bow (?). An inflatable shark head watches him. Brad talks to James. "Yeah, I'm just listening to Jingle Bells, Christmas carols, that sort of thing. Get myself in the festive mood." In the galley area, Justin is going through a bag of something while Emily distributes candies, including candycanes her mum brought over. She talks about how with freezedried food it's hard to do much in terms of Christmas dinner, but she's making sure everyone has their favorite. "Try to keep a happy boat." Justin: "I've got beef stroganof. Probbly my least-favorite meal on the boat. I was hoping for roast lamb, mashed potatoes." We see the pouches next to the galley with candycanes in each. Brad: "Chirsmas day has consisted of the same things we've been doing for the last 3 weeks. Four hours on, four hours off." He explains he's been doing some restocking of spares, making sure he knows what they've got going into the next leg. On deck, an animated Santa toy has been lashed to the instruments on the mast. He sings a rock & roll Christmas song. On the bow in the background, Martine and Brad (I think) are shifting t eh stack forward for lighter wind.Slomo shots of the crew working in the cockpit. Washing machine. Nicho comes below, takes his gear off, washes his face in the galley. Nicho: "You see when you take certain medication, 'Don't operate this vehicle when tired and drowsy'? Well, everyone's operating this vehicle tired and drowsy." Talks about getting rest, food, makes for better decisions. Martine comes below, takes off her gear. "For me sleep and food go side by side. The less I sleep the more I have to eat to have energy." Martine eats. Nicolai talks below about the balance between sleeping and eating. Brad: People sacrifice a lot to get a couple of minutes extra sleep. People don't brush their teeth to get a couple more minutes of sleep. Don't want to name names." Martine gets in her bunk. Nico, talks about the upcoming stronger conditions. "Plenty of sleep. Just look at me." He grins.Pretty clouds. Crew shifting the stack as AkzoNobel sails downwind with the main lowered. Nicho explains that they've just finished stackign in preparation for hoisting the main. Talks about the repair; difficulty of getting a glue cure in the cold conditions. Maybe having a chance to catch some boats. Main goes up slowly. Nico, on the stern: "Tracks popped straight off. So obviously it couldn't hold in the conditions... Hopefully we'll get it down now, and... try it again. Still 3,000 miles to go." (Side note: It sure seems like Nicho has basically taken over the boat. Is Simeon even in command at this point?) Lowering the main. Martine gets washed off the cabin top by a wave; catches herself. They struggle to lower the main. Jules talks about the fleet being gone, not wanting to get down south and have to beat back, which they can't do. Nicho responds: "Well, we can step it down later in the day. Get a plan for this track. Even if the fleet's gone, get to Melbourne on time... for the next start." Below, Brad takes off his foulies. Looks very discouraged. "Pretty frustrating working two or three days to get it done, it pops off so quickly afterwards." Talks about trying to jury something else up, hope that that works. Slomo albatross. Below, working on the track repair, Nicolai watches Simeon eats in the background. "We've got five tubes of glue left, which means after this we've got one more. So this better work." More repair attempts on the mast. Emily watches from the stern. Nicolai, below, explains that the glue needs 6 to 8 hours to cure. Going to sail some more, and then try to hoist again before sunset.Drone shot from ahead as AkzoNobel reaches on starboard, triple-heading. Below, Emily eats. She talks about how they're getting into the Southern Ocean. It was sunny and warm yesterday, but now that's changed. Justin getting dressed talks about the "Southern Ocean weather" coming up. Keeping in front of the front, in flat water, hopefully. But at some point "it's going to become a bit bumpy, and wet on deck." Emily talks about being nervous to see what it's going to be like. Drone shot of three sailors working on the bow, one on the bowsprit, rigging lines.Drone shot of two boats a few miles away to weather sailing on port tack: TTToP on the right and Scallywag a few hundred yards behind them. Drone pulls back to show AkzoNobel below, ahead and to leeward of the other boats. Shot from amidships on the weather rail showing Akzo's crew with the other two boats behind them and to weather. Jules sits on the weather rail with his arms crossed. Jules: "Got a pretty close race on at the moment with the last 270 miles to Cape Town." He talks about how they have a ridge of high pressure ahead of them that they keep banging into, which brings them back to the other boats. Nicolai steers. Brad talks about the tricky conditions, constant adjustments. Simeon scowls at the boats astern of them. Emily, in the companionway: "It's 6 a.m., just finished a 4-hour watch, 2 to 6. It's one of the longest 4 hours I've had on this trip. We're pretty close to both Turn the Tide and Scallywag, and less then a day from Cape Town, so it's pretty tense." Very low-altitude drone shot of AkzoNobel sailing to weather in light conditions. Jules talks about how they'll probably finish in the middle of the night. "There'll probably be a massive park-up close to the finish line." Last place will probably be decided 300 meters from the finish. "We'll have to get our rabbits' feet, 4-leaf clover, dice, and other such paraphernalia out and give them a shake." Shot of Scallywag and TTToP to weather and behind them.Slomo shot of a dark albatross gliding in their wake. Emily, below, getting out of her bunk: "It's cold." Jules, at the nav station, talks about how they're still riding the front, but have high pressure a few days ahead. Simeon repairs some piece of gear, hands it to someone, and talks about the upcoming winds and strategy. "In general we've been sailing the boat well." Nicho, on the stern: "Number one challenge is how we're gonna get ahead of some of the boats ahead of us." Talks about how boats can get stuck in the approach to Cape Town. Slomo of spray coming into the cockpit.Nicho, on deck as AkzoNobel sails on starboard gybe in 10 knots of wind: "The last sched dropped us from first to fifth... The game is to set ourselves up for the next front." Simeon talks about the next 24-48 hours, and how they've stacked the sails smaller so they can get them further astern. Emily: "I'm expecting it to get a lot windier and a lot colder. So I've got two sets of thermals I've been saving up for the whole trip." Brad, below, says he's been saving thermals. Nicolai, below, also says he's been saving up a new set of thermals he'll be pulling out. Shot up the slot at AkzoNobel triple-heading on starboard.Emily gets dressed below, clips on a fanny pack. She talks about how it was a big risk for them to cut the corner by positioning themselves east of the fleet. A big risk for Jules, because there are all the other navigators saying no, we think this western route is faster. Peter, on deck, trims the main and explains that if you stay with the fleet you know you'll be close. But if you take a risk you have a chance of making a big gain. Behind, Martine is on the helm, beaming (as usual when steering). Luke talks about taking the risk. Luke: "Looks like now maybe it hasn't paid off, but it's certainly not over yet. We'll see what happens." Jules, below at the nav station, about the risk of diverging from the four boats ahead. Shot of routing software on the computer. Talks about how the weather pattern was evolving ahead of them, so they wouldn't necessarily be in the same weather pattern as the leaders when they got there. Jules: "We're sill gonna be a fair way behind, and we'll have to look for the next opportunity." Super-low-altitude drone shot (well below deck level) of AkzoNobel from close ahead and to weather, pulling back and ascending.Beautiful drone shot of AkzoNobel reaching on port at sunrise. Nicolai types at the nav station. He talks about how they just peeled to a fractional sail. Falling a little bit behind the other boats; looking for speed. Mast cam view of the deck. Jules, on deck: "We're struggling a bit with the reaching setup; the guys in front of us stretching away from us." On the stern, Emily washes up. Peter, on a sheet, talks about how they have some nice waves and are trying to catch most of them without getting too low. Luke talks about how it's frustrating that the rich (ahead of them) are getting richer. Brad, below, talks about the frustrations of leaders pulling away without their being close enough to see their sail setup. (Note: He has a raspberry-colored buzz cut from the equator-crossing ceremony, which didn't show up so far in a video.) Nicolai talks about working hard, not panicking, getting faster day by day. Slomo shot of Emily and Nicho working the foredeck.AkzoNObel reaches on port gybe with a reefed main. Simeon sits on the weather rail; Emily sits forward of him on the mainsheet. Simeon talks about having a rough night, having been stuck under a cloud and lost a bit. Slomo of bow. Shot of them racing in a rain squall. Nicolai talks about two kinds of clouds: a "sucking" cloud or a "dropping" cloud. "Dropping clouds are the good ones, they come with rain but they also come with winds. The sucking clouds are the bad ones; they just take the breeze and you park up." Shots from inside the cabin as rain pours down on the cockpit. Below, Jules talks about the squall; it was their first big one, 33-35 knots. They saw it on the radar but were late reducing sail and so "got a bit low in it". Jules: "I just got washed back by a wave as I was trying to go forward, got knocked back on my backside, which was a little embarrassing." Shot of Jules being washed off his feet in the cockpit by a wave. Jules talks about seeing the size if the cloud after coming out of it. Slomo shot of water pouring in the cockpit. Martine, soaking wet below, talks about not being able to find her shoes, but it being a good opportunity for a shower, then she resumes looking for fresh clothes.Emily, below, pours from the kettle into a food bag. Emily: "I think probably the hardest thing to get used to on this boat is always being wet." Shot on deck of spray coming over the bow. Luke, on deck at the stern getting doused: "It's just challenging at the moment becuase you're constantly wet." He talks about stuffing people's wet things into an empty food bag to get it out of the way. Luke: "I see there's a bit of a rabbits nest of wet clothing gathering below... People will be asking where their wet stuff is, pretty soon, looking to dry it out. I think it's pretty much gone for the race." Emily: "A tiny bit of water down your neck seal, and all your thermals are wet... I'm still wearing the same wet thermals that I put on when I left the dock a couple of days ago." Emily and Simeon eating below. Simeon says something to her about chocolate, jokes about losing his credibility (?). Simeon: "I always find the first 24 hours tough. Then you get used to you're always damp. You smell like a web Labrador that just jumped in the mud. But when everything is like that, evertying becomes simple as well... You appreciate your warm meal out of a plastic bag. Whole group... [gestures at Emily] Good company." Camera pans to Emily, who keeps eating without looking up or acknowleding the remark.All slomo shots: Martine on the helm in the sunset with spray. Washing machine cockpit shots. Emily on the aft pedestal with the outrigger plowing through the water, then with spray washing over her.On deck as AkzoNobel surfs on port gybe, Brad, behind Nicolai's back, sprays whipped cream onto a plastic cake box lid. He says to Nicolai, "Here you go," and pushes the "pie" into Nicolai's face. With Simeon steering, the crew in the cockpit eats cake and sings "Happy Birthday" to Nicolai. Nicolai: "Best cake I ever had." Nicolai: "I was on a boat like this in the North Sea with Simeon." Emily: "Did he give you cake?" Nicolai: "It was more colder. It was more miserable, there was less fun and there was no cake. So I prefer this one over the last one." Washing machine shots of Nicolai getting doused. Nicolai back at the cake-eating: "My teammates are being really rough on me today. They put whipped cream in my face, which is not a smart move when you're about to go across the equator in one week." Brad: "I heard that's a Danish tradition though." Nicolai: "It's not a smart move." Brad, eating cake: "It's a Danish tradition." Nicolai: "It's not a smart move. When you're crossing the equator in one week, King Neptune's got a few things to sort out and you don't put whipped cream in my face; that's not a smart move."As AkzoNobel sails upwind on starboard, Simeon talks to the crew about what's happened in the fleet around them. Nicolai is on the helm; Emily looks at a tablet. Simeon: "Scallywag was hanging on, but they fell off, so they're 10 miles behind now... Light is on top, and pressure is there [gesturing to leeward]. Vestas is trying to defend. But actually MAPFRE went up higher... Options are still open."Emily, on the bow as AkzoNobel is slatting in no wind, points forward to where you can see Porto Santo lit by the setting sun. Emily: "Looking at where we are going, you can see the islands we've got to round, in the sunset, silhouetted." She grins and gives two thumbs-up to the camera.