Liu Xue 'Black' / Dongfeng Race Team

gender Male
Dongfeng sailing upwind with the J1 and reefed main on starboard. Black working in the pit. Daryl: "Every sailor loves going upwind. Getting pounded by the wind, the waves, the water. And it's very slow." Black talks about going upwind, rough conditions, washing machine. Jack talks about how sailboats can't sail directly into the wind. "It takes a lot longer to get where you're going, it's more uncomfortable..." Marie actually sounds like she means it when she talks about liking sailing upwind. Marie near the J1 clew getting spray as she works on a sheet. Jérémie on the foredeck attaching the tack of the J2 for a sail change.Lowering the J1 inside the newly hoisted J0. Watch change below; Daryl eating. Marie, below, recaps: "Finally we did lots of maneuvers. We don't have this much wind last night. The sea state was okay." Next night will be a bit more difficult. Wind to increase soon, so she needs to eat to get more energy. Shot of her putting on her foulie jacket on deck. Pascal on the helm during a sail change. They bear away with the large headsail flagging; not sure what that's about. Black and Carolijn talk in the cockpit. Kevin on the helm. Carolijn talks about the whole fleet being together. Whole fleet hanging together. They just cracked off. Trying to do their jobs, not make mistakes. A long leg; keeping everything together. Looking at the next 2 weeks.Dongfeng docking out at the start of Leg 6. Black waves goodbye to the people on the dock. We see the MH0 being unfurled as Charles steers on the approach to the starting line. AkzoNobel is visible ahead of them and to leeward, the rest of the fleet to weather. Pascal with a tablet in his hand. Jérémie, after the start, looking forward at AkzoNobel and Brunel ahead of them. We see them furling the MH0 for a tack from port to starboard, then unfurling during a tack back to port. Charles: "Nice one." Pascal navigating. Their jumper going over. Kevin standing on the lifelines to do something to the clew of the MH0. Passing the leaving buoy. Later, they prepare to peel to the J1. Daryl: "Put the sheet around the winch." Bagging the lowered MH0 on the foredeck. Charles on the helm, talks about the start. Not so great in terms of their start, but good to have wind in exiting Hong Hong. Now at the back of the fleet. Daryl: "Looking forward to sailing into Auckland. Probably 20 days away. Don't want to get too excited yet." Jack, stacking on the foredeck, says pretty much the same thing. "Long way to go though."Wake shot with Dongfeng sailing fast. View forward from stern, double-headed as they sail on port gybe. Washing machine. Below, Jack eats something. He looks a bit shell-shocked. Jack: "It's been a very brutal leg so far. It's very demanding conditions; always fast, always wet... I don't think I've gone on deck without the wet weather gear the whole race. Everything's wet. Inside the boat's horrible. There's water everywhere. There's water in your sleeping bag, there's water in your personal bag. There's water everywhere. It's been a really hard leg to sleep; every time you seem to get in your bunk there's a gybe or a sail change... It's been a hard leg. Everyone's feeling the push at the moment, everyone's tired... We're close to the end, conditions are still hard at the moment, but everyone's focused on getting to Australia in one piece and in the best place we can... First time I've sailed into Australia, so it's kind of a treat. A big Southern Ocean leg done, which was an unknown for me." Talks about how a lot of his family witll be in Melbourne for the finish. Hasn't seen some of them in 6 years, so it will be great to catch up with them. Really looking forward to getting in. Shots of water condensing on things in the cabin, water flowing. Marie asleep. Jack putting Sudocrem on his hands, face. "It might look ridiculous." But explains how the cream helps with little cuts and sores from the gaskets and salt water. Black, below, talks about how it's a long day, and a lot of pressure, lack of sleep. "A bit tired, yes." Shots of the cockpit from the cabin, washing machine.Below, Kevin talks about being tired. "With my watch partner Carolijn Brouwer we have been 12 hours on deck - 14, 2 more. Lots of gybes along the ice limit. Now we are getting more pressure, sea state." Now 2 hours of rest before being back on deck, then one very important gybe before heading north for Australia. Carolijn: "I think I have to admit I'm pretty tired now. All the action on deck seems to happen when Kevin and I are off watch. But it's part of the job and you ahve to get it done. It's part of the race." In the Southern Ocean it's harder because of getting dressed and undressed. "When you do that every 2 hours it gets a bit frustrating. In other legs it's much less a problem... There's a lot more layers coming on than otherwise.... Have to push really hard. The guys on MAPFRE have done really well." Fabien talks in French. Black talks about normal life on board. Having to be ready. Eating a lot of food with no rice (?). Pascal talks in French.Pascal, at the nav station, puts on a headset. He announces something we hear booming through a PA system. "20 minutes before the gybe. 20 minutes." Jack, waking up in his bunk. Carolijn and Black getting dressed. Marie getting dressed. Pascal over the PA: "Three minutes." Crew goes on deck, perfoms the gybe. Below, we see Marie climbing back into her bunk. Pascal, over the PA: "Okay; in about 20 minutes [?] another gybe." Time lapse shot of repeated gybes with short intervals between them.An albatross (Wandering Albatross, maybe?) soars by them in windy conditions. Washing machine action in the pit as someone (can't tell who) coils line under a reefed main; rest of the crew on deck is at the back of the boat. Stu and Jack, who is climbing onto the boom, secure the loose main at the bottom of the reef. Black, on the aft pedestal, gives two thumbs up. Shots of crew on the stern from the cabin.Closeups: binnacle compass, hands on the wheel, easing the mainsheet. Marie, trimming the main, talks about the weather being warm, and no birds. It's sad they are too far north, not in the Southern Ocean. "Maybe tomorrow; we will see." Stu, on the helm. "Definitely not the Southern Ocean. We don't wear sunglasses in the Southern Ocean." (He laughs.) "This is far too nice." Black talks about the blue sky and being quiet warm. Wake shot. Below, at the nav station, Pascal talks about strategy with the approaching low, gybing during the night to get the good position, the good pressure. Difficulty of routing with the exclusion zone/ice gate. No way to get away and be safe. Tomorrow night, maybe gusting to 45 knots. Increasing wave state. He shows the routing software with the low moving through.