Stu Bannatyne / Dongfeng Race Team

gender Male
Jack, in the cockpit, talks about having fought with MAPFRE since day one. "This morning they managed to get ahead a bit, which is very disappointing. But we still can see them, we've still got about 4 days to the finish, so the fight's not over. And I think the arrival into Australia will be quite hard, so nothing will be over until we properly cross the finish line." Stu: Th enext few days are going to present some interesting opportunities" moderate downwind sailing at the moment, but some strong downwind sailing over 30 knots, couple of gybes... The difference between MAPFRE and ourselves so far have been little small mistakes by either team." Looking for an opportunity to get back into it. Confident in the boat and the team."If they make any mistake we'll be right there to pounce." Sunset shots of them sailing on starboard gybe. Pascal and Kevin, below, looking grim. Kevin talks in French.Cabin shot of the stern with Dongfeng sailing fast under gray skies. Slomo waves, spray, washing machine. Of the three on the stern, in closeup it looks like Marie grinding. She makes a shaka sign. On the helm, Fabien eats something orange. On the mainsheet, Stu looks resolute; starts to eat something. Below, Charles takls about the remainder of the leg. Five days to go, 2,000 miles. Two big decisions: first one tonight, second one in two days, when they decide to go north to go to Melbourne. That will be the key probably. For the moment, strongest point of Dongfeng, reaching. MAPFRE was quite fast downwind. "I would say that 80-90% of the race now is downwind. Unfortunately it's not the big reaching. I think everyone is happy to be ahead of MAPFRE, but everybody knows that they are not far... We will do it but for sure it will be a great fight.... As you know it is a very important leg... To be first is good but it's always a lot of pressure." Shot of writing on a Dongfeng bumper sticker on the cabin bulkhead: "Never give up. - Wolf" On the stern, Marie throws bits of food for the person trimming the main (Stu?) to catch in his mouth. He succeeds; they high-five.An albatross (Wandering Albatross, maybe?) soars by them in windy conditions. Washing machine action in the pit as someone (can't tell who) coils line under a reefed main; rest of the crew on deck is at the back of the boat. Stu and Jack, who is climbing onto the boom, secure the loose main at the bottom of the reef. Black, on the aft pedestal, gives two thumbs up. Shots of crew on the stern from the cabin.Closeups: binnacle compass, hands on the wheel, easing the mainsheet. Marie, trimming the main, talks about the weather being warm, and no birds. It's sad they are too far north, not in the Southern Ocean. "Maybe tomorrow; we will see." Stu, on the helm. "Definitely not the Southern Ocean. We don't wear sunglasses in the Southern Ocean." (He laughs.) "This is far too nice." Black talks about the blue sky and being quiet warm. Wake shot. Below, at the nav station, Pascal talks about strategy with the approaching low, gybing during the night to get the good position, the good pressure. Difficulty of routing with the exclusion zone/ice gate. No way to get away and be safe. Tomorrow night, maybe gusting to 45 knots. Increasing wave state. He shows the routing software with the low moving through.Pascal, at the nav station, talks about the last 100 miles to Cape Town. Standing in the cabin hatch, Stu talks about one time coming into Cape Town having a breakdown at the end that almost cost them a position. He sprays fresh water from a drinking bottle onto his face. Stu: "That is beautiful." Slomo shots of the cockpit: Carolijn trimming a line, Pascal (?) looking thoughtful, taking a line off the pit winch. Loud wind audio; mast cam view of two crew working on the bow in the spray. Looks like changing down to the J2, maybe? Bow cam shot, looking aft, of the new sail unfurling. Crew pulling the old sail, bagged, off the bow. Stern cam view, looking forward, with reefed (double-reefed?) main and crew at the mast. Grinding. Charles on the helm. Spray.In the cockpit, Charles talks in French. Below, Stu talks about how obviously they're pretty disappointed to have fallen behind from the controlling position, but hard work has gotten them back into it. "Got a real race on our hands with Vestas, who are just a few miles behind us. And MAPFRE, a decent chunk ahead but certainly not out of touch." Charles talks about Table Mountain, and its effect on the wind. Carolijn, below: "When everything's against us is when we get the best out of ourselves and push really hard. Marie: "As Pascal [said], we have to be faster and lower." Stu: "We have to remain positive and keep chipping away." Slomo shots of the cockpit, washing machine. Darryl laughing at the pedestal, on the bow. Wake. Below, a loud sound of a sheet being eased. Stu: "A minor wind check; nothing to be concerned about." mast cam view of the deck, spray.On deck, Carolijn, Stu, Horace talk about their favorite and least-favorite on-board foods. Carolijn, grinding with Horace, talks about contraband. Stu: "I would actually say some of these meals I would order if I were out at a restaurant. They are actually that good." Below, Stu prepares food in the galley and eats it. Horace pulls out a packet of Chinese food. He points to it. "Every day... Where's my Chinese food?" Jérémie eats. Horace eats. Horace: "I never want to see this one again."With Charles at the helm, Dongfeng gybes from port gybe to starboard as dawn is breaking. Slomo of the crew working in the cockpit. We then see them gybing back to port? Sunrise. Then they're on starboard again. Jack, sitting in the cockpit, talks about the tactical situation and the remainder of the leg. "We'll find out in two hours at the next sched report. Everyone's a bit anxious for that." Pascal, at the nav station, looks at the latest sched. He rubs his face. On deck, Dongfeng is sailing on starboard gybe around midday. Marie, sitting on the cabin: "I think it is not really good. We did a mistake, maybe, gybing too late. It's not a good moment to talk to Pascal. We have to let him... alone." Pascal stands in the cockpit, reading from a piece of paper. Marie and Horace stand close to him; Darryl steers. Pascal: "MAPFRE is 89 miles at 244." Marie: "Eighteen, uh, eighteen, uh..." Darryl: "Eighty-NINE." Marie: "Eighty-nine!" Pascal: "We are fucked. [beeped in FB video] Darryl: "We are what?" Pascal: "We are fucked. We are completely fucked." Stu: "Well, well, well. Three holes in the ground. I've seen some very strange stuff happen out here on the ocean. It's never over till it's over... Nothing we can do about it now, except keep sailing our boat. Who knows what might happen." [NOTE: This video does not appear in the Raw Content feed. I'm taking this from the version posted on the VolvoOceanRace YouTube channel, and taking the time of it from the time of the two stills posted to the Raw Content feed showing the same events.]Stu plays King Neptune. Carolijn assists as Jack is inducted.Closeup of chart plotter: We see the equator crossing. We see Jack on the aft pedestal and Carolijn in the hatchway prepping King Neptune's trident.Slomo shots: Jack grinding in the washing machine as water drips from his hat. Compass and spray. Horace in a foul-weather-gear cowl. Spray coming over the cocpit. Stu in the spray. Three egrets flying alongside Dongfeng. Below, Charles takes out a food pack from a storage locker. Jérémie says something to him in French; Charles answers and they both laugh. Shots of the food (some special treat?), Charles calls out the hatch to the cockpit: "I went to the bakery this morning!" The food being shared around among the crew in the cockpit. Charles, a nav station: "It's always good to have a sweet, a surprise." Talks about being in a tough battle, warming conditions, sweat. Charles showering in spray on deck, then rinsing off below wiht water from the galley. Carolijn in her bunk: "Twenty days is too long without a wash... I've just washed my neck, hair; it's nice."Stu, at the helm, driving Dongfeng on a fast port gybe. Sea state looks quite flat, but they are *flying*.Carolijn, on deck in foulies, gives a thumbs up. Carolijn, below: "I'm lucky enough to be on watch with Stu Bannatyne, AKA 'Magic Stu'. When it's heavy weather downwind sailing, that's the man you want on the wheel. He's doing over-hours for the last couple of days. But the boat just smokes when he's driving." Shots of Stu on deck, slomo of Stu on the wheel. Stu, below, as Carolijn and SiFi take off the foulies in the background: "There's definitely a bit of technique to driving well in heavy airs, especially at night. It's mostly about trying to be accurate, small movements. A bit like trying to drive a car when you're fast. Just try to use very small movements of the wheel... At night might use stars if there's any around to help keep the boat going straight, otherwise it's just a bit of a feel for it, keeping a steady heel angle, and not being afraid to push the boat hard to keep it going fast." Shots of Stu on the wheel at night, slowmo of him being hit with spray at the wheel. Charles, below: "I wanted someone with experience going south. This guy did it eight times, the Volvo Ocean Race. He's probably one of the guys in the world who has raced more in the Southern Ocean. There aren't so much people have a lot of expeirence in this part of the world. I think it's because he spends hours and hours pushing the boat in eight Volvos, and this is the best school to learn in. In France we come from singlehanded sailing, we don't drive so much; we have autopilots, so we can go fast with the pilots but for sure we don't drive enough. This guy has made eight Volvos since he was a kid; probably one of the guys in the world to have much hour driving fast in big waves. That's why he's so strong." Slomo of Stu at the wheel.Stu on the helm as Dongfeng sails fast on starboard gybe around sunrise. Below, Carolijn climbs down through the hatch and takes off her facemask. Later, she stirs her insulated bowl with steam coming out of it. It's a cool shot; she looks like she's been out in it, and is just having a quiet moment to catch her breath. Carolijn: "It's quite nice that every race whether in port or leg we've done so far we've finished on the podium, which is a good start. 'Cause it's a bloody long race and we've got 8 more months to go, 10 more legs to go. To start with a third place is not a bad start... We've gotta keep working hard from here and keep doing what we're doing. We sailed out of Lisbon in good shape and showed everyone that we can be fast in those conditions, and just need to keep doing the same. So yeah; happy with how we're doing so far."Shot out the companionway as Dongfeng goes to weather on starboard in 15 knots of wind. Carolijn on the helm; Jack leans on the grinder pedestal. Charles, at the nav station, gives a position report (I think?) over a microphone to the cockpit. Horace, getting his foulies on below: "It's getting exciting. We are getting closer to the top three boats, and AkzoNobel is visible in the AIS area... We still have 20 hours until we are arriving in Lisbon. So... we are working hard." Above, Horace stands on the outrigger rigged at the shrouds, doing something to the clew of the J2 (?). Richard: "Smile!" Horace makes the "shaka" gesture. Jérémie on the helm, talks to Charles in French via the intercom, while Stu listens from the grinder handles. Horace works on the stack.Jérémie on the helm, silhouetted against the sunrise, with two competitors visible behind them (per the tracker, TTToP on the left and Brunel on the right). Another shot, this time of Pascal looking at the other two boats. Clew of the Masthead 0. Later in the morning, Stu talks in the cockpit: "Battling it out for fourth through seventh here at the moment." Stu asks Pascal, below, if he has information from the 0700 position report. Pascal responds that he does, and starts reading it out. Stu winces. Stu: "A lot of work to do here." Carolijn cranking a winch; Horace stacking below.Night shot of the young moon over the heads of the crew in the cockpit. Stu, below, talks about the night. It was hectic, it got dark, they entered the Strait of Gibraltar, forecast was for winds over 30 knots especially on the exit. They first reefed with the Masthead 0, then peeled to the Fractional 0. "It's far too early in the race to be risking anything. Nice short sea state; wind against tide. So we've got plenty on at the moment. The wet-weather gear is getting a good working. Just have to survive for the next few hours and the breeze should drop off again." Crew in the cockpit; Pascal at the nav station. Stacking below. Night vision shots of crew in the cockpit gybing reefed main, washing machine, foredeck.Stu: "Clear sky on that side of the cloud." Charles: "But it looks more windy here than here, no?" Someone off camera (Charles? Pascal?): "Starboard is going to be a nightmare." Carolijn: "Painful." Stu (disgusted): "Fuck." Horace moving the stack forward. Carolijn: "The wind's just gone ligher on us... Could be an option to gybe out and split from the fleet. But at the same time the wind's very right at the moment. We've decided we're going to stick with the fleet and see what the pressure's going to do ahead of us." Sounds like maybe Stu was advocating for gybing onto starboard, but Charles overruled. (Per tracker, most of the fleet did end up gybing onto starboard while Dongfeng and Mapfre continued longer on port. Those that gybed earlier did better, leading to Dongfeng entering the Strait of Gibralter in last place.)