Opens with a view of the mast instruments: Boatspeed 12.8 knots, woo! Looks like this is early evening. Drone shot from slightly earlier with sunset. Horace gives Carolijn Chinese lessons in the cockpit; says he's going to teach her some Cantonese words for Hong Kong. Carolijn: "I like learning languages. I already speak 6 languages, and I'm trying to learn a 7th language, Chinese Mandarin." She talks about cultural differences. Hates being somewhere and not being able to communicate. "There's always something to learn." Sunset clouds.Frank on the helm at sunrise. Justine trims. Doldrums. Franck, on the bow, talks about how the doldrums is a very large area compared to the Atlantic, and the course is set requiring them to go through it. Now there's a weird wind from the southwest, which is impossible according to the model. Just have to push the boat and use the wind you have and be very concentrated on tuning. Remember is it's a game, and the finish line is very far away. We were in front of the fleet a long time, but the important part of the race is now. And the first boat to catch the wind, and then 1,000 miles to race. The goal is to stay with the fleet, not take too much risk, and we have the good speed to be in the front when the wind is stable. Don't be stressed. Shot of AkzoNobel ahead of them, then next to them. A whale surfaces near them. Has a small dorsal - sei whale? Horace talks on the bow about the heat, and having patience when trimming. Talks about having passed AkzoNobel. "Next target: Vestas. Let's go. There. Not too far." We see Vestas ahead and to port. They sail faster in a bit of a puff. Concentrating. Looks like all hands on deck. Then: drifting again. From below, Horace calls out the latest sched. Jack, the sunset behind him: "Day of snakes and ladders... This afternoon was quite nice. Had a big cloud come. Had more than 10 knots of wind for the first time in 3 days, which was a real pleasure. Made a bit forward, but it wasn't very long. So there's still a lot of work to do." Amazing low-altitude drone shot, overtaking them from astern with the sunset and AkzoNobel (left) and MAPFRE (right) to port of them. Then another drone shot from the opposite angle showing Vestas closer to them, to starboard. Favorting this one, too, mostly (again) for the drone work. Nice job by Martin.Sophie, on the aft pedestal, summarizes where they stand. Have gained back on the two lead boats, AkzoNobel and Dongfeng. Blair, trimming, talks about how they caught sight of the other two boats that morning sooner than they expected; MAPFRE got some good pressure and the other two boats got stuck a little too low, such that "Vestas and us caught them a little bit." Now into tradewind sailing. Now they're in the same wind so it's all down to boatspeed. Maybe there will be more clouds at night that allows for bigger gains and losses. Sophie: "I think we're all pretty excited to be back at the front of the fleet." Willy stands at the shrouds looking up at the sails. Shot of Dongfeng ahead of them. Támara looking forward. Sunset. A bird (a Brown Booby, I think) flies above the masthead. Pole shots of the rudder, the wake.TTToP, sailing on starboard gybe, is silhouetted against the dawn as they approach Scallywag, on port. Scallywag gybes in front of TTToP. (Same gybe we saw from TTToP's perspective in their video from 08:40:01 today.) Steve, with TTToP visible a few boatlengths behind them: "Sort of can't shake them off at the moment; they keep coming at us. But that's all right. It's good two-boat testing." Witty, on the helm, looks over his shoulder at TTToP even closer behind them. Steve talks about how when they were reaching toward Cape Town it was easier. Now, running, the strategy is more difficult. He explains that they're both sailing away from Cape Town at the moment, and TTToP is technically closer to the finish than they are. Steve: "Technically they're ahead of us. Which seems a bit bizarre." Awesome first-light drone shot from astern of TTToP looking forward to see both boats. Steve: "There's a very clichéd saying in sailing, boatspeed makes you a tactical genius. And it does. If I can sail away from these guys it's not that hard. If we were a little bit quicker, my job becomes quite easy." More awesome two-boat sunrise drone shots.