Literally the exact same shot to open the video: Pablo below talking in Spanish about the last day's results. He repeats in English: Got some breeze after the doldrums, 20-22 knots. One of the steering cables broke, and the boat broached. But it's a good thing that both wheels are independent. So can steer, but you have to steer from the leeward side. But at least you can sail the boat in a straight line. Luckly Neti was on deck, he went down and took the spare one, and we fixed it quite quick, and in a half hour were able to sail the boat normally again. Night footage from the cabin as they sail in big wind, and someone (looks like Xabi) works on the wheel in a headlamp. Xabi below, in the aft crawl space, fixing the steering cable as Tamara talks to him in Spanish. Crash cam footage in black and white.Closeups of B&G instruments with nothing displayed. Neti, below, explains that they have "No batteries, no systems, nothing." Neti and Joan working in the bottom part of the cabin. Pablo, on the helm, talks about the issue in Spanish. Shot of the compass binnacle. Xabi stands talking on the satellite phone, explaining the situation. Computer screen showing electronic schematics. Neti working on an instrument panel while engine runs. Joan and Neti talking in Spanish. Joan stands on the stern on the sat phone, holding it high for better antennae operation. Closeups of various components. Xabi talks about fuses blowing, the electronics breaking, the PLC (?) broken means they can't control the keel. Working on a workaround. Pablo talks in Spanish in the cockpit. Instruments behind him apear to have readings, though. Pablo, Neti, and Xabi below work on the keel box. Xabi, to the cockpit: 'It's moving. So what do you need now?" They laugh at the response. Neti: "It's 33 now; what works for you?" He manually opens a valve. "There. That's 30." They laugh. Looks like they're manually bypassing the fuse to operate the keel hydraulic pump manually. Neti, on deck, explains that they took a switch from the bilge pump, and rigged up a system where they can move the keel. It's tricky, and in windy conditions would be very hard, because one person would need to be below at all times to move the keel. He then repeats the explanation in Spanish.Closeups of B&G instruments with nothing displayed. Neti, below, explains that they have "No batteries, no systems, nothing." Neti and Joan working in the bottom part of the cabin. Pablo, on the helm, talks about the issue in Spanish. Shot of the compass binnacle. Xabi stands talking on the satellite phone, explaining the situation. Computer screen showing electronic schematics. Neti working on an instrument panel while engine runs. Joan and Neti talking in Spanish. Joan stands on the stern on the sat phone, holding it high for better antennae operation. Closeups of various components. Xabi talks about fuses blowing, the electronics breaking, the PLC (?) broken means they can't control the keel. Working on a workaround. Pablo talks in Spanish in the cockpit. Instruments behind him apear to have readings, though. Pablo, Neti, and Xabi below work on the keel box. Xabi, to the cockpit: 'It's moving. So what do you need now?" They laugh at the response. Neti: "It's 33 now; what works for you?" He manually opens a valve. "There. That's 30." They laugh. Looks like they're manually bypassing the fuse to operate the keel hydraulic pump manually. Neti, on deck, explains that they took a switch from the bilge pump, and rigged up a system where they can move the keel. It's tricky, and in windy conditions would be very hard, because one person would need to be below at all times to move the keel. He then repeats the explanation in Spanish.Drone shot of AkzoNobel reaching unde the MH0 in 10 knots of wind. Nicolai, below: The keel situation is not improving, unfortunately. It's gone the other way. Bailing... It's coming in quicker than we can almost get it out. Luke: Everyone's tired at the end of our Southern Ocean leg. Having to bail every 15 mintues. In another 6 to 7 hours it will moderate. Shot of bailing. Nicolai: No rules when it comes to fixing boats in the Volvo. You can do whatever you have to. I went into Luke's crew bag and stole one of his socks... Luke: I'm happy to take one for the team, and do what it takes to get us to the finish line. Sandals!Dee, in sunrise: It's Easter Sunday. And if we're good boys and girls we'll get Easter Eggs. But what we really want is a working rig on starboard. Lucas: New rules of the boat: Can't sail on starboard. Only on port. Sort of like a one-legged duck. (he quacks) Liz: we can't sail with the full main, cant' sail with any masthead sails, can't slam into any waves, can't say the f-bomb on deck because someone might think we've just broken the mast. Bleddyn: [Something about poo bags. Probably just as well I can't understand.] Liz explains she'll go up with a spanner and try to get the spreader back in while someone on deck leans on the stay to try to pop it back. "Someone biggish." They look at Frederico. "It's not going to break?" They laugh. Liz goes aloft. Gopro (garmin) footage. "Strops are on." She uses a grinder on deck to shave down the wrench. Bleddyn: We have a grand total of 1/4 turn. So about 40 steps to go. Frederico bounces on the stay. Dee and Brian talk by the wheel; Liz cheers from the mast. "Dee! It's done!" Dee: "Now that's an Easter chick if ever I saw one." Liz: This spanner is going into the Hall of Fame. Henry: 2018 years ago, Jesus rose from the dead. And we've just resurrected our mast. Liz, in the dark, talks about the screwing in. Below, Franscesca: "It's a miracle." Dee: "The race is back on." "1000 miles to go you guys." Gopro shot of liz signing the mast with a white pen: "01/04/2018 Rig = 0 // Liz = 1 !!!" Plus a tongue-sticking-out happy face.Closeups of water leaking out from something below. Simeon explains: He noticed when he was going to light the fire for cooking. Water was squirting out of the cover plate of the keel box. Nicolai talking with him. Brad gets out gear to go for a little swim. "Just jump in for a quick swim and see what I can find." On deck in the pre-dawn. Brad goes down in a survival suit, it looks like, with goggles. He pulls himself down to the keel. Calls for slack. Brad comes back: Two cover plates for the keel box. There's a gaping hole about that big in the bottom of our boat. Should be sealed here (inside). Going to have to come up with a way to sail the boat without pushing water inside the boat. Simeon: A bit of slamming, because of the big speeds, broke part of the cover plate of the keel. Simeon, Jules, and Nicolai discuss. Nicolai on the phone, asking about reinforcing with battens on the inside. Simeon: Keep an eye on it, maybe make some reinforcements. They remove the cover plate inside. Fiddle with reinforcements. Reattaching the cover plate. Beautiful sunset drone shot. Simeon: Not so much a repair as much as a reinforcement. "We think this will bring us to Itajai safely, and otherwise I'll have to sit on top of it."Rob steers as MAPFRE reaches with FR0, J2, and J3 but no main. Ñeti, below, talks about the conditions. Blair, below, talks aobut how they've had the main down below since leaving the Horn. Repair is curing and doing a little more hand-stitching. Time to put it up and hopefully it holds together. But it's quite a big repair, so we'll wait and see. Shot of main below. Crew wrestles the sail up. Neti: has been 36 hours since we did the track. Which is good. Shots of Rob at the back of the boom. Hoisting the main. Spreader cam view. Main hoisted. Main flying. Sophie to Neti: Shake my hand. (They shake.) Sophie: Congratulations. Neti: Looks quite good. The track is also good. Looks like the glue is working perfectly. Now we have to be conservative at the beginning. Hopefully we can keep the mainsail in one piece. Don't have much glue. But hopefully it works.Abby, below, I think everyone's really willing us to the finish. Especially hearing about other boats' problems. We had a slight problem with our rudder. I think it would be exceptional for us to win this leg. Sunrise. Abby: Just praying that nothing goes wrong with the boat between now and the finish. (You can see how Yann is almost exclusively doing crew interviews below since he injured his back.)Dee, below with alarm sounding, talks about frontal system gave them nasty waves, and now they have a rig issue. On deck, she explains that Liz is going up to check. GoPro (Garmin) shot from Liz's POV up the rig as she finds the starboard middle spreader popped out of the mast. Elodie explains that they are trying to bounce the mast to screw the spreader into the mast again. Not easy. Dee explains that they've received a phonecall that okays them to use the J1 and the FR0 and the reefed main. "It's good news and we're going to get sailing again!"Stern cam / crash cam shot of MAPFRE sailing on port gybe. There's a bang, and the boom drops and the main flops. This must have been when the head of the main tore free. A crewmember shouts: "Aaaaahhhh!" GoPro (Garmin) shot from the crewmember up the mast (Ñeti?). "¡Un poquito!" There's glue and stuff on the mast. The torn upper edge of the lower part of the main is visible. They approach their support boat at anchor. Drone shots of them rafted alongside. Someone on the shore team talks in Spanish. Pablo: In one sense we were lucky to break so close by. Ñeti, covered in glue, talks about the attempt to repair the mast. He's more concerned about the mainsail. It's in two pieces. Quite a tricky repair with the material they have here and where they are. And it's quite cold, so curing is hard. In the dark, Xabi talks in Spanish about the repair attempts. I think he said departing in half an hour. Shots of them working on the mainsail. Glue, hot air gun, cluing the mast track. Time-lapse shot of them working on the mainsail repair. They pull away from the support boat in the night with wind howling around them.Xabi, on deck, talks in Spanish. They appear to be motor-sailing in protected waters close to shore. He talks about their suspension of racing. He then explains in English. Part of the mast track came unglued. Fought hard with ratchets and straps on the mast, not with the main working properly. Today, just as they pass Cape Horn they had a bad tear of the mainsail. So they have no choice but to try to fix this. Expects to spend 12 hours; will be challenging. They had a plan with their shore team just in case. He talks again in Spanish. Shot of the main torn in two. Sign underfoot says "Cabo de Hornos".Xabi, below, says they have to be happy where they are. Everyone knows about the mast track problem. Yesterday they did some reinforcements, which aren't brilliant, but are enough for them to push hard to Cape Horn. They're 50 miles back from the lead, which is nothing. [Big bang. It sounds like they hit a pretty solid chunk of water.] He repeats his explanation in Spanish. Stern cam, and then spreader cam, views of the cockpit as they sail fast with big waves washing over them. Washing machine. Mast cam looking forward as they surf.Blair, below, talks about having passed Point Nemo this afternoon. Pretty cool, but mixed emotions because of the issue with the mast track. Have been struggling to keep up with the fleet. Below, Tamara talks in Spanish. In the cockpit, a crewmember holds a sign with distances to Itajai, Auckland, and the International Space Station. Mast cam view forward as they surf and stuff the bow. Drone shot as they sail downwind in lighter conditions (for the Southern Ocean) as a crewmember aloft just below the first spreaders works on the mast track. Favoriting for that epic shot.Xabi, below, talks about how they were preparing for a gybe, putting in a second reef so it would be safer, and the mast track came unglued, like it did for AkzoNobel in Leg 3. Pretty disappointed, but reacted well. Got the main on the lock on the second reef and ratcheted the track. Now are sailing with the FR0 and double-reefed main. Plan is to keep sailing hard, because these are good conditions to stay with the fleet. After the Horn can maybe do something with glue to repair. Trying very hard to stay in the race. He then repeats the explanation in Spanish.Epic drone footage of Brunel surfing big waves in 35-40 knots in the Southern Ocean. Looks like they're under the FR0, J3, and a triple-reefed main. Bouwe, below: Of course the sailing is really fun, but it's hairy because if you do something wrong it can go terribly wrong, so it's always to find that balance. He says that if they'd been closer to the ice gate conditions would have been worse, so they played it a little safer and the rest of the fleet did the same, so positions are the same as when they entered the ice gate.Sunrise rays through the clouds. Double- (triple- ?) reefed main and no headsail. Crew in the cockpit works on repairing the runner block. Witty, below, explains that as they were gybing for the ice gate the runner got twisted and the block broke. "We were lucky. We could have snapped the runner and lost the rig." Managed to jury rig. But now they're 110 miles behind. "Happens." "You can deal with little setbacks, but when it sort of the final nail in your coffin for aspirations for a good result in the race, that you've spent years trying to do it, how do you think it feels? But we never give up, got 4,000 miles..." Keep pushing, maybe when we get around the Horn... We were 100 miles behind and won into Hong Kong, and were 100 miles behind and finished second into New Zealand. "Plenty of fight left in this dog." Closeup of jury-rigged runner; washing machine. Witty below: "I think when you consider yourself a reasonable level of yachtsman, you've gotta do this leg. And you've gotta get through this leg... I'm gonna finish the leg and I'm gonna do well and give it a good go. That doesn't mean I'm gonna wanna do it again though, I'll give you a tip. Bloody horrible." Crash cam footage from the stern of someone (Witty?) being washed off the wheel by a wave.Sam asks Lucas, on the helm in fairly mellow conditions at sunset, "How does your Southern Ocean song go?" Lucas sings: "I am an albatross, and I fly across the seaaaa!"Epic drone footage of Brunel surfing big waves in 35-40 knots in the Southern Ocean. Looks like they're under the FR0, J3, and a triple-reefed main. Bouwe, below: Of course the sailing is really fun, but it's hairy because if you do something wrong it can go terribly wrong, so it's always to find that balance. He says that if they'd been closer to the ice gate conditions would have been worse, so they played it a little safer and the rest of the fleet did the same, so positions are the same as when they entered the ice gate.Sunrise rays through the clouds. Double- (triple- ?) reefed main and no headsail. Crew in the cockpit works on repairing the runner block. Witty, below, explains that as they were gybing for the ice gate the runner got twisted and the block broke. "We were lucky. We could have snapped the runner and lost the rig." Managed to jury rig. But now they're 110 miles behind. "Happens." "You can deal with little setbacks, but when it sort of the final nail in your coffin for aspirations for a good result in the race, that you've spent years trying to do it, how do you think it feels? But we never give up, got 4,000 miles..." Keep pushing, maybe when we get around the Horn... We were 100 miles behind and won into Hong Kong, and were 100 miles behind and finished second into New Zealand. "Plenty of fight left in this dog." Closeup of jury-rigged runner; washing machine. Witty below: "I think when you consider yourself a reasonable level of yachtsman, you've gotta do this leg. And you've gotta get through this leg... I'm gonna finish the leg and I'm gonna do well and give it a good go. That doesn't mean I'm gonna wanna do it again though, I'll give you a tip. Bloody horrible." Crash cam footage from the stern of someone (Witty?) being washed off the wheel by a wave.Sam asks Lucas, on the helm in fairly mellow conditions at sunset, "How does your Southern Ocean song go?" Lucas sings: "I am an albatross, and I fly across the seaaaa!"Epic drone footage of Brunel surfing big waves in 35-40 knots in the Southern Ocean. Looks like they're under the FR0, J3, and a triple-reefed main. Bouwe, below: Of course the sailing is really fun, but it's hairy because if you do something wrong it can go terribly wrong, so it's always to find that balance. He says that if they'd been closer to the ice gate conditions would have been worse, so they played it a little safer and the rest of the fleet did the same, so positions are the same as when they entered the ice gate.Sunrise rays through the clouds. Double- (triple- ?) reefed main and no headsail. Crew in the cockpit works on repairing the runner block. Witty, below, explains that as they were gybing for the ice gate the runner got twisted and the block broke. "We were lucky. We could have snapped the runner and lost the rig." Managed to jury rig. But now they're 110 miles behind. "Happens." "You can deal with little setbacks, but when it sort of the final nail in your coffin for aspirations for a good result in the race, that you've spent years trying to do it, how do you think it feels? But we never give up, got 4,000 miles..." Keep pushing, maybe when we get around the Horn... We were 100 miles behind and won into Hong Kong, and were 100 miles behind and finished second into New Zealand. "Plenty of fight left in this dog." Closeup of jury-rigged runner; washing machine. Witty below: "I think when you consider yourself a reasonable level of yachtsman, you've gotta do this leg. And you've gotta get through this leg... I'm gonna finish the leg and I'm gonna do well and give it a good go. That doesn't mean I'm gonna wanna do it again though, I'll give you a tip. Bloody horrible." Crash cam footage from the stern of someone (Witty?) being washed off the wheel by a wave.Sam asks Lucas, on the helm in fairly mellow conditions at sunset, "How does your Southern Ocean song go?" Lucas sings: "I am an albatross, and I fly across the seaaaa!"Rain in the cockpit; crew showering. Alberto is very happy, after a week. Grinding for a sail change. Sailing upwind. Carlo fiddles with a pedestal. Below, he and Kyle inspect the pedestal, which is broken. Kyle explains that the pedestal started slipping. To fix it they've had to pull the pedestal apart, requires coordination with the guys on deck. Found the issue, which was a chip in one of the sprockets. So he's shaved that down, and will put it back in place in the position of the pedestal that they don't often use. Carlo works n the sprocket. Lubing the chain. Kyle: I've seen a lot of people do this stuff, but I haven't done it much myself. On deck, Louis comes up to report on a very good sched. "Only 2,500 miles to go." They flp in little wind. Below, Kyle works on putting the pedestal back together. Coordinates with Carlo on deck. "Just be a bit rough with it, Carlo." Kyle: "Done."Simeon talks below. Fantastic to lead. Long way to go. Have to have confidence. Upcoming doldrums. Jules at the nav station talks to Simeon. Computer screen shows weather. Simeon: Pressure of being in the front and making choices that everyone else sees. A bit of a vulnerable spot. Justin, below: A lot of hurdles to get through. Maybe first into the doldrums, first out of the doldrums. Everyone working well. Good feeling. Cecille: Nothing's set in stone. Far from it. Washing machine shot of the cockpit from the cabin. Slomo spray from the cockpit. Nicolai getting drenched. Waterline pole shot. Slomo of cockpit. Pole shots from outboard. Nicho on the helm in rain and squally conditions. Simeon grinding. Looking up the slot with major firehose action. Martine and Jules grinding on one pedestal. Cecile: "It's wet! But fast." Nicolai, below, talks about blowing out a Cunningham ram. Losing oil for the Navtec system. Nicolai and Simeon working on the hydraulics below. Nicolai explains that the bigger problem is that the cunningham uses the same oil as the other systems. If they run out of oil it will affect other sail control systems. More shots of repairs as they bounce around.Closeup of chart software. Slomo of Bernardo on deck. Bernardo, below, summarizes their position. Talks about how all the gear makes them sweat a lot. Liz works on the watermaker pump, explaining what she's doing. Brian [Carlin]: "You would have made a good dentist." Dee talks about how Liz is very good at fixing boats, but doesn't have the empathy to work on humans. Shots of Liz soldering on the watermaker pump. "It's in, it's installed, it's working. We're gonna make some water to celebrate. It's like champagne. But it's water instead."GoPro shot from the masthead. Shot of the instruments on the mast. Looks like they're reaching on port tack in about 10 knots of wind. Nicolai grinds. Clew of the MH0 in the background. Nicolai: explains the strategic situation, how they have to sail upwind. Nicho, on the helm: "Boredom has set in... Question of the watch is how much Nutella gets produced in the world in a year." He's added another question as to annual Vegemite production. Martine and Nicolai discuss Nutella production. Nicolai: "It's been a relatively short leg, but it feels like a long one." Hard because they haven't been near other boats. Nicho says they've learned some things about the boat. Nicolai: Looking forward to land and rest, but mostly to getting a reset to get back with the fleet. Shot of the mainsail looking up.Pascal reads the latest sched over the PA system. He talks with Martin in French. He talks with Charles. Charles: "Not so bad news. Vestas has not been so fast in reaching. We are leading again with 7 miles. In a good position... We can hope to keep this distance or increase it as of the entrance to Melbourne Bay." Talks about what happened yesterday, thinking it was their last gybe and then having the keel problem. "We don't know if we will be able to cant the keel to max cant on port."We see the cabin. Kevin is looking down in the hull on the port side of the galley; Fabien and Pascal watch him. Kevin says something in French. Shots of 6 inches of water sloshing around on the port side of the cabin, just in front of the hatch. Fabien explains something to Martin in French; I'm picking up "boat" and "keel". Kevin: "We have a problem with the keel. I don't know exactly why. At this time we want to do a fitting, to change the sail. And Pascal [something] to tell that we had plenty of water and oil in the boat... I hope it is not a problem with the keel ram attached to the boat." Shot of them pumping water out; shot of the port keel ram with water flooding in around its forward end. Jack explains that the port keel ram, which pushes the keel from side to side, where it attaches to the boat the hull fitting has cracked. So a lot of water came into the boat, and they've lost the oil from the ram system. Have turned off the port ram and put oil back into the starboard ram. On deck, Black explains. Below, Kevin operates a hand-held drill pump (adding oil to starboard ram?). He explains that the system is designed to work with only one ram. Below, Charles and Kevin talk in French, and use the starboard ram to operate the keel. Charles, at nav station, explains that they've fixed it, but have lost 10-15 miles and are now close to Vestas and Brunel. He has looked at the routing, and it is helping the fleet catch up. He's hoping they don't lose second place. "We deserve second place."Charles, at the nav station, looking bummed as he looks at routing software. He says it isn't good news; Vestas has passed them and they have not that much wind. (Though looking at the tracker now, I'm not sure Vestas is actually going to get ahead of them.) But they have to gybe, while Dongfeng can go straight to the mark. So he thinks Dongfeng can stay ahead. Not fair, because they are so far apart they have to do different routings, and the routing was poor for them and better for Vestas. Also the keel problem has cost them some key miles; he hopes that isn't the difference between second and third place.Epic slomo shot of a big Southern Ocean wave. Nicho, below, eating: "Batten fouled again and another repair again. Getting there. Main's back up, so it's not slowing us down any." Justin, below, repairs a batten. "This is Frankenbatten. It's now got four different battens in it." He shows his work: The batten with multiple clamps holding the pieces together while glue cures. "We're obviously trying to be tidy Kiwis who use as much [something] as we can, 5200." There are clamps made from vice grips, from channel lock pliers with a big rubber band around the handle squeezing it closed, and a high-tech looking black clamp. Don't tell the media guy, but I've raided his camera box and found a clamp. Which I'm sure he's going to work out when it gets back that it's been used for some sort of repair." Nicho: "We don't mind doing all these running repairs all the time as long as we can go at pretty much full pace. But it wears everyone out. I don't think Brad has had a full off watch for a long time now. [To Brad.] When was your last full off watch?" Brad (sitting near the galley, pulling off bits of tape): "Can't remember my last full off watch." Brad, to James: "Haven't seen land for over a week now. As far away from anything as you can possibly be, more or less. It's not too bad. It's actually quite cool. Really good breeze, good waves. Good sailing." Martine coils lines in the pit, gets washed over by a wave. Below, she talks to Konrad: "Southern Ocean has been pretty cool, going downwind, in these big waves, sailing during the night with big seas. Cold weather as well. Everythying is dripping on the boat, but sailing has been pretty good, besides our breakdown. As long as we have all the sails up, it's all good." Nicho: "You have moments when you wonder what you're doing down here. Other moments quite in awe of the natural bueauty and harshness of the place... How vulnerable you are down here on a little carbon shell in the middle of nowhere. You want the leg to be over, but also how special it is to be here." Slomo of Nicho on the helm, albatross flying by. [Side note: Again, no Simeon. I'm increasingly of the view that Nicho is actually functionally skipper at this point.]Somone (Brad?) works on the masttrack up the mast. Simeon says it's the second attempt, with different glue. "Not a specified curing time like the books. But we hope it's strong enough." Going to hoist the main again, and put a strap around where the batten car is and hpe for the best. Everyone looks at the sail with expressions of concern. Nicho: "It'll work". With the main up they sail faster. Everyone looking up. Nicolai on the stern talks about how they knew after the first one it wouldn't be a good repair, but they knew after this one it would be a good one. "It's holding." Below, Nicho is getting his foulies off. "Been sailing two or three hours, and no problems, so... Hopefully now we can be 100% to Melbourne, catch some miles up." In the background Martine gets her foulies off. Nicho talks about how there could be a weather pattern that would pull the boats together. "We're a long way behind, but no one's giving up." Talks about needing to make the next start, and get the boat fully prepared and operational.Spreader cam view of foredeck with Scallywag sailing way off the wind. Witty at nav station, talks about having "grannied" (tacked around, presumably) twice instead of gybing, because of having heard that AkzoNobel broke their mast track while gybing. Wants to keep the boat together here and finish fast. Jokes about the ice limit as a fence the Volvo people built in the ocean. Talks about having a week along the ice gate. Spreader cam shot of the boat surfing. Witty: "I told Parko to sail at 95%, not 100. He's doing 29 knots, so he must have taken a knot off. He si a full-blown lunatic." Crash-cam view of Parko being blown off the wheel by a wave while surfing; jumping back on the wheel. Parko below: "Yeah, I drove for a little bit with no hands there. Didn't Chinese and we didn't tack, so it's okay." Bow cam of spray. Alex, below, talks about steering. "Yeah, it's pretty difficult. I probably only do a half an hour at a time... It's tricky now, because the waves are so big that you don't want to go down some of them. But sometimes you kind of have to go down them... It's a bit of an art to go fast, but not go down the wrong waves and break the boat." Parko talks about it taking energy, having just done a gybe, it saps up all the energy from your little naps, it's gone after you have one maneuver. Time to eat some food and recharge, and be ready for the next one when it comes.Bouwe, below, talks about how Dongfeng and MAPFRE are ahead of the low and have a better wind angle than Brunel does. Talks about where the boats are. How they were sailing yesterday in a top speed of 60 knots. "People have to remember that's Force 12. That's pretty scary. But everything is fine; the boat is in one piece. That's the most important thing. The people are fine as well." Talks about the outlook, that the people in front get to ride the front longer than them. But you never know; there's 4,000 miles to go. Coming into Melbourne can be tricky. "We got a mail from the Race Office that they had some breakages. Of course it's unfortunate for them.. just one of those things, a mistake.. of course it's expensive in multiple ways, result-wise probably not very good, and probably get a penalty as well, so it's a double whammy." Slomo shots on deck: waves, someone steering, grinding, washing machine in sun and high wind. Wake with birds. Someone on the bow with a new sail.Crash cam footage from stern camera. AkzoNobel is preparing for a gybe in high winds from starboard to port. They gybe happens, but goes too quickly (?), the main slams over, and there's a loud bang that sounds very ungood. We switch to handheld camera on the stern as crew is shifting the stack to port. They send someone aloft, where we can see the main has some major luff-car issues (?). Shot of the helmsman (Nicho?) on the port wheel with a nasty-looking squall beyond him. Awesome shot of him surfing the boat as a wave breaks on their port quarter; shot pans forward to show the crew working around the mast. We see them lowering the main, which has been detached from the mast with lines on the cars to help control its descent. Below, Nicho explains what happened. Had to gybe in 35-40 knots. "Had a bad one. Thought we had a good wave to go down, and as we went down the boat slowed up, stopped; I should have pulled out. We probably would have broached..." But what did happen is they slammed the main into the runner, breaking the battens and pulling the track off the mast. Getting the main down was tricky, with a 50-knot squall happening at the same time. Now just have a jib up, doing 16 knots in 45 knots of wind. Plan is to get the track screwed/glued back on, repair the battens, over the next day or two. But it's going to take time to get to 100%. And they have to be careful.SiFi sits at the nav station looking at a routing screen on the computer. His breath is visibly fogging due to the cold. "It looks like we're walking the line between speed and safety reasonably well." Slomo of his breath fogging. With low sun behind them as they stand on the stern, Charlie and SiFi talk about a problem with the main. "There's so much friction on it on the spreaders and shit it's probably not going anywhere." Nick talks about a couple of squall lines came through, up to 45 knots. And going onto the third reef the headboard of the mainsail isn't going onto lock. Mark: "Well, we've got 44 knots, and if you look this way there's a massive cloud, and the water's more white than blue." Charlie jokes about not saying "white squall". Slomo. Sam to Mark: "How is it being down here?" Mark: "It's everything you'd expect. Windy, cold, we've got 48 knots right now. Look upwind. It's crazy. Doing 30 knots of boatspeed. It's pretty crazy, but somehow everything's still in control." Slomo wake.Lucas explains that they had a vane come off their wind sensor and Liz had to go aloft to fix it. He talks about how it's a lovely day and he's working on his tan for Melbourne. Dee talks about having a cup of tea on deck. Drone shots of Liz at the masthead. GoPro shots of her going up, at the mast. Back on deck, Liz says, "I just needed some alone time. It's the only place you can be by yourself on the boat." Below, Bleddyn shows the damaged windvane. More drone shots.Dongfeng slats in light winds. Carolijn calls as someone else pulls in a line: "3, 2, 1, okay; hold furl." Charles, sitting at a winch, says something about using the "masthead upwind" (MH0?). The crew trims the MH0 in light winds. Charles, holding the main steady by hanging onto a thin cable under the boom, talks about having to cross a ridge, a position in high pressure between two winds. Trying to catch the low pressure in the south. Always difficult. "The wind is very shifty, very light, but we are lucky because the system is moving in the right direction." Drone shot of Dongfeng sailing upwind on starboard under the MH0 with another boat (I think Brunel around 2017.12.11 09:55:35 UTC) behind and to weather of them. As the drone circles htem another boat is barely visible further away behind and to leeward of them; I think that's Scallywag. As the shot continues we see Jack going up the mast. He reaches the masthead and the camera circles him, showing the two boats shown before and then showing another boat ahead of them (MAPFRE, then the lead boat). On deck, Jack explains that in the big winds the day before part of the wind sensor unit at the masthead blew off, so he was up there replacing it. "There's not much wind but we're right into the swell. On deck it feels really flat but when you get up there it's exaggerated by a lot. Feels like you're gonna get thrown off every three seconds. Bear-hugging it the whole time. It's really not fun. Nearly got it done."Pascal, at the nav station, talks about the last 100 miles to Cape Town. Standing in the cabin hatch, Stu talks about one time coming into Cape Town having a breakdown at the end that almost cost them a position. He sprays fresh water from a drinking bottle onto his face. Stu: "That is beautiful." Slomo shots of the cockpit: Carolijn trimming a line, Pascal (?) looking thoughtful, taking a line off the pit winch. Loud wind audio; mast cam view of two crew working on the bow in the spray. Looks like changing down to the J2, maybe? Bow cam shot, looking aft, of the new sail unfurling. Crew pulling the old sail, bagged, off the bow. Stern cam view, looking forward, with reefed (double-reefed?) main and crew at the mast. Grinding. Charles on the helm. Spray.In the cockpit, Sophie works on the disassembled mainsheet winch drum. Sophie: "It's like winch school at SCA. When I was on SCA I learned quite a lot about winches." Ñeti talks about the hydrogenerator. Pablo talks in Spanish. Closeup of the hydrogenerator. Blair, on the helm, talks about Rio, and about winning the gold medal at the Olympics. Blair: "It's an awesome city and I have very fond memories of it."Shot over the side as Brunel reaches on port. Annie, below, tells a disgusting story about having peed in the head, and going to pump it and having sewage fly out over her. Annie: "I've just had to clean the head and shower at the same time. It's the cleanest it's been. So I guess that's the silver lining." Carlo shows his bowl of food: "It looks something like this." Various shots of the head.Kyle, in the cockpit: "This winch is back-winding." Kyle disassembles a which. Kyle explains: "Just have some broken springs in the which, which started to back-wind under load, which could be very dangerous. If you've got a lot of load on the sheet, and the winch starts spinning backwards then the handles will spin and if it hits you and the thing's unloading you can break your wrist." Kyle, on the low side working on the winch, is wet from spray. He asks Annie, on the helm: "A little less heel, please, Annie." Close up of the broken spring. Below, Abby calls up: "Still got longer to come down." (Maybe she's securing the backing plate as the winch is reassembled?) Below, Kyle wipes his face with a towelette. Talks about being 40 minutes late to go off-watch. Realizes that there's a sail change to do, which will take him back on deck. Carlo, on the bow, pulls a new sail forward. Kyle grinds a winch. Kyle goes below. Shot of Kyle sleeping in his bunk with earbuds in.Carlo, below, talks about needing to replace the end-fitting on the outrigger. He shows the fitting, and talks about the outrigger. He and Abby work on it. Then Carlo talks about Peter working on it, and we see Peter doing that. Abby talks to Richard, showing the sheared threaded piece that had been left in, that Peter apparently extracted. More shots of the repair. On deck, Bouwe offers praise: "Nice job! Twenty-four hours!"People asleep below. Ben works on the water maker. He explains that it has stopped making water, so he's inspecting, looking for leaks. "It's a bit of an unexpected thing to happen. There was water this morning, and now it's stopped." Shot of a spigot with water coming out. Ben: "There we go. We've got water." Fish: "Nipper's been working pretty hard, and he's pretty resourceful." Alex, getting dressed below: "It's surprising, how even though you think you're going quick, someone's still quicker than you. You think that you're pushing, but someone else is pushing harder than you. That's probably a reality check for everyone."Steve at the nav station below at night. Steve: "Few issues on board. We've got a big leak at the nav station, and we've wiped out the main navigation computer. Which is pretty annoying 7 hours into a 21-day leg. A fair bit of work, trying to swap things around and make it work off our other computer, and I'm feeling a little fragile in terms of not having a lot of backup."Witty on the helm: "The pin's come out of the furling unit under load and the sail's dropped in the piss. I don't know how. But we recovered really nicely; could have cost us three spots. Boys did a good job. Boys and girls." (Tom takes helm back from Witty.) Witty: "Still don't know how the pin comes out under load; that's a bit of a mystery." Crash-cam night vision shot from stern looking forward. Masthead 0 suddenly comes free and falls over the side. Crewmember: "Oh, fuck!" Tom (?) (on the helm): "Everyone up! Gotta get (something) lowered. Gotta get the MH0 on board, J1 up. Everyone up!"Shot of AkzoNobel slatting in no wind. Simeon: "We had a little bit of an accident yesterday with one of the mainsail battens; the top batten." Shot of them lowering the main, removing batten cars from the mast track. We see the crew repairing the broken battan, as Luke talks off-camera: "There's so many pieces that go together to making a mainsail, that you break one bit it's all related to the others. Unfortuantely we broke this top batten, which is the main batten that sets up the whole square top of the sail. So with a couple of days of reaching ahead of us, we thought we'd take this light air moment to repair it. Boys have done a good job, and now we're ready to hoist." Shots of them re-hoisting the main.