Liz, in the morning, points to the high pressure to starboard. "That there is the center of hell." Elodie says "good morning" as she climbs out the companionway. Lucas steers. Bianca makes a face. Bianca: "Pain. Lots of pain." Elodie: "Happy morning, Freddy." Liz does a puppet show with two red gummy animals (dinosaurs?): "Hello. I'm a diplodocus." "I'm a dinosaur too, but I don't know what kind I am." She eats one of the dinosaurs. "It's all getting a bit weird out here." Bleddyn eases the runner, making a loud noise. "Sorry Henry." He does it again. "Sorry Frankie." Bianca: "Cape Horn feels like it was weeks ago... As long as we beat MAPFRE it's fine." Below, Dee and Liz get the latest sched. Dee: "They were doing 5.1 knots." Liz (excited, dancing in her seat): "We were doing 9.6! We were doing 9.6!" Dee laughs. "Ah. How sad for them." They both laugh. In the cockpit, Elodie and Bianca ask Sam about the position report. Elodie: "How is it?" Bianca: "Are you gonna tell us how it was?" Lucas, on the helm: "MAPFRE, 20 miles in front." They laugh. Lucas: "Another 10 days out here, Sam." He pumps his fist. "Yes!" Dee comes up from below, putting on her sunglasses to try to hide her expression. She laughs. "I can't hide it. I tried to look really sad but I can't do it." She claps. "We were twice as fast as them!" She summarizes the current distances. 99 miles ahead of MAPFRE with 660 miles to go. Dee, below: "Nice to have some good news." She and Liz talk about AkzoNobel; Dee doesn't think they're going to get them. Rainbow, sunset.Someone off camera: Vestas got dismasted. Peter: Have they? That's not good... Conditions definitely aren't as bad as they have been. MAPFRE stopped; we don't know why they stopped in Cape Horn... We've obviously had a fair few issues on board... Good to hear they're all safe. But terribly bad luck.Stern cam / crash cam shot of MAPFRE sailing on port gybe. There's a bang, and the boom drops and the main flops. This must have been when the head of the main tore free. A crewmember shouts: "Aaaaahhhh!" GoPro (Garmin) shot from the crewmember up the mast (Ñeti?). "¡Un poquito!" There's glue and stuff on the mast. The torn upper edge of the lower part of the main is visible. They approach their support boat at anchor. Drone shots of them rafted alongside. Someone on the shore team talks in Spanish. Pablo: In one sense we were lucky to break so close by. Ñeti, covered in glue, talks about the attempt to repair the mast. He's more concerned about the mainsail. It's in two pieces. Quite a tricky repair with the material they have here and where they are. And it's quite cold, so curing is hard. In the dark, Xabi talks in Spanish about the repair attempts. I think he said departing in half an hour. Shots of them working on the mainsail. Glue, hot air gun, cluing the mast track. Time-lapse shot of them working on the mainsail repair. They pull away from the support boat in the night with wind howling around them.Xabi, on deck, talks in Spanish. They appear to be motor-sailing in protected waters close to shore. He talks about their suspension of racing. He then explains in English. Part of the mast track came unglued. Fought hard with ratchets and straps on the mast, not with the main working properly. Today, just as they pass Cape Horn they had a bad tear of the mainsail. So they have no choice but to try to fix this. Expects to spend 12 hours; will be challenging. They had a plan with their shore team just in case. He talks again in Spanish. Shot of the main torn in two. Sign underfoot says "Cabo de Hornos".Vestas closes on Cape Horn. Stacey, below: Now we're in the Atalantic, you can see how much calmer it is. Her second time around Cape Horn; definitely will be her last time. Shots of Cape Horn. Tom, on deck: I don't know how many more times I'm going to do it. Maybe one's enough for me. He talks about the cigar. About how his gloves are off. Crewmembers on stern share a cigar: "You're fucking up the rotation." "Amazing how good that shit tastes right now." Hannah: I think if I knew how hard it was going to be, I would not have done it. It really tested me in every way. The amazing team got me through. Someone (Nick?) drinks from a bottle of liquour. Charlie, below: I wish we had the point, but it was good nonetheless. Cape Horn and its associated waters threw everything it had at us... It's an achievement. Someone on the helm with Cape Horn over his shoulder. SiFi looks at Cape Horn.AkzoNobel closes in on Cape Horn. As they leave it behind, Simeon talks about how it's good to get past it. Have to give everything now and try to catc up with the guys in the lead. Slomo of Cape Horn with the binnacle in the foreground. Nicolai: Happy to be here in one piece. Hard to get to. Nicho, on the pedestal: Used to see this stuff as a kid in books, early explorers. Never imagined doing it himself. But now he has 5 times. It's why he has all the gray hair. Closeup of Cape Horn.Charles, on the helm, grins as Cape Horn recedes on their port quarter. Jeremie also grins. Marie, Jack, Kevin, Carolijn, Pascal, Horace: slomo portraits with Cape Horn. Below, Marie talks in French. Horace talks in Mandarin. Horace then talks in English: He was very excited this morning. He passed Cape Horn, unlike 3 years ago (when they were dismasted short of the Horn). Now it's time for a fight to the finish line.In morning sunlight under scattered clouds, Dongfeng sails on port gybe toward Cape Horn. Shots of crew moving a sail on the foredeck, sailing closer to Cape Horn. Crew waves; holds a whiteboard reading "Cape Horn." Below, Charles talks in French about Cape Horn, about the family of John Fisher. Pascal talks in French about Cape Horn. Carolijn talks tearfully in Dutch about Cape Horn and John Fisher.Spreader cam view as Vestas surfs. Washing machine shots, slomo washing machine. Phil, below: Cape Horn's a big day in any sailor's life. This is going to be the fourth time I'm around it. Last time with Abu Dhabi, Chuy Bermudez was on the radio with the lighthouse keeper, and apparenlty it's voluntary thing for 12 months. He'd been there with his wife and kids for nearly a year. Slomo in the cockpit. Hannah, below, talks about Cape Horn. She had no idea how tough it was going to be. So windy, waves like nothing she's ever seen before, non-stop. Surfing shots on deck, grinding. SiFi, below: One of the toughest Southern Ocean legs I've ever done. Relentlessness of it, constant high winds, cold, snow. People have been doing a great job to battle on. Reaching the Horn will be a good moment to celebrate and reflect on the leg so far. Slomo washing machine in the cockpit.Dee looks out companionway at sunset; she cheers. Crew at the stern cheer back and raise their arms. Francesca (I think) on the foredeck with a camera takes video of herself with her life vest accidentally deployed, laughing. Crew in the cockpit (can't tell who under all the layers) mugging and waving at the camera. High drone shot of them sailing in relatively light winds (20?) with the FR0 and a reefed main with both J2 and J3 hoisted but furled. Drone shot of a gybe in those conditions! Dee, below: We think we've just done our final gybe in the Southern Ocean to get to Cape Horn. Francesca: Our last time in the Southern Ocean, finally we will get some warm weather. At the same time I'm looking forward for Cape Horn in daylight... Something I've dreamed of my whole life, and it's almost come true. Liz, on the stern: It's a bit sad, because it's always amazing sailing down here. But it's been cold, and everyone's looking forward to warming up. Not going to shoot myself in the foot; have 250 miles to go. But she's looking forward to the restart and the last part of the leg. Frederico: Still have to be very focused on the job. One more night to get through. Sam to Liz: Would you come back and do it again? Liz: "Of course I'd come back and do it again. Sign me up tomorrow... Even with one arm." Frederico: "Yeah, with some dry socks this time. For sure." Francesca: I don't know. Maybe I'd do it again. Right now I'd say no. Maybe after... Night vision shot from the stern cam of washing machine in the cockpit.Below, Joan talks about approaching Cape Horn, and the conditions over the next few days. Trying to find a balance between safety and pushing the boat hard. Vestas and Dongfeng ahead of them; expect to be close to them as they round. Ñeti, below, talks in Spanish. He shows a piece of hardware (mast track car?). Ñeti and Xabi work to repair a fitting. Washing machine shots in the morning sun on deck. Gybe from the stern. High-wind drone shots as MAPFRE surfs. Slomo drone shots of crew working on the bow to hoist the FR0. Drone shots in very windy conditions: streaking on the water as they surf with just J2/J3.Fast wake shot. View forward as they stuff the bow. Fast surfing shot looking aft at massive waves. More shots of epic big-wave surfing. Brian, in the companionway: "I've got my skis, poles, boots; I'm just gonna go out now. Snows up. Should be perfect powder. Southern Ocean... I'm gonna go enjoy it." Slomo of stern as snow falls. Spreader cam view of washing machine in the cockpit. Dee and Brian at the nav station talking strategy. Brian jokes about the motion: "Hang on in the underground train." He explains to Sam: They're less than 2 days from Cape Horn. Have to do 2 more gybes to get to Cape Horn. Critical to get the timing of the gybes right. Very shifty winds, both direction and speed. Are in a good position in the fleet; need to get to Cape Horn in good position. Not time to go crazy and break the boat trying to get first to Cape Horn, because Brunel's going to be first to Cape Horn.Lucas bailing, talks about how the VO65 is not dry. Slomo spray. Stern cam footage of near-roundup. Bleddyn: Pushing pretty hard for the last 2, 3 days. Not sure how many days it's been. Gybe in the cockpit. Liz talks about how as of the last position report they're the furthest south and closest to Cape Horn, so in the lead. More than halfway to Cape Horn. And it's a pretty special thing. Bleddyn talks about how they had a duel with MAPFRE. Shot on deck of TTToP sailing on starboard gybe with MAPFRE a mile ahead of them. Then MAPFRE abeam of them. Elodie: Pretty nice to see them, because we're pushing hard at the moment, gybing, which doesn't allow us to rest or eat properly. So it gives you another kick of energy to keep going. Dee: Have a crew that's been here before, so they're more confident. Good drivers, and we've made some good decisions. Does prove to the naysayers... but I always knew. Slomo big-wave shots. Slomo washing machine. Sam asks Dee, below, what the goal is now. Dee: Keep the boat on its feet, keep my crew in one piece, get them safely around Cape Horn, and get to Italjai... She talks about a restart after Cape Horn.Spreader cam view of AkzoNobel surfing and stuffing the bow. Below, Simeon recaps the last 48 hours; busy, gybing, changing sails. 2000 miles to Cape Horn. Point Nemo. Brad: Talks about Point Nemo and the space station. Simeon: What to ask the astronaughts on the space station? Emily wonders if it's easier to go to the toilet on the space station than it is on a Volvo boat. Luke: Jealous. Their stacking technique must be far superior to ours. Simeon: what they have for dinner. Nicolas: They go to the toilet like we do, they eat freeze-dried like we do, they don't sleep much, have a pretty cool view. So I pretty much see myself as an astronaut these days. Simeon: Must be a pretty impressive view. We have an impressive view of the ocean, and of the stars when the clouds let them through. But their view must be even better. Stern cam view of Martine on the pedestal as they surf.Charles, at nav station: In 30 hours we'll enter very strong conditions. Can't carry the fractional in those conditions, so will need to work out good sail combination. Goal is not to break the boat. A very tough leg. Strong wind, and full downwind with many gybes. I do have stress of course. Because you have the responsibility of the people and the boat. But you still want to fight for the first place. It's a balance between speed and safety. When we have 40 knots we know what sail to use. But then we have a gust to 55, and we have to react. But that's part of the Volvo Ocean Race. Horace talks below in Mandarin. Pascal, at nav station, talks in French while demonstrating something involving chart/routing software.Spreader cam view of AkzoNobel surfing and stuffing the bow. Below, Simeon recaps the last 48 hours; busy, gybing, changing sails. 2000 miles to Cape Horn. Point Nemo. Brad: Talks about Point Nemo and the space station. Simeon: What to ask the astronaughts on the space station? Emily wonders if it's easier to go to the toilet on the space station than it is on a Volvo boat. Luke: Jealous. Their stacking technique must be far superior to ours. Simeon: what they have for dinner. Nicolas: They go to the toilet like we do, they eat freeze-dried like we do, they don't sleep much, have a pretty cool view. So I pretty much see myself as an astronaut these days. Simeon: Must be a pretty impressive view. We have an impressive view of the ocean, and of the stars when the clouds let them through. But their view must be even better. Stern cam view of Martine on the pedestal as they surf.Charles, at nav station: In 30 hours we'll enter very strong conditions. Can't carry the fractional in those conditions, so will need to work out good sail combination. Goal is not to break the boat. A very tough leg. Strong wind, and full downwind with many gybes. I do have stress of course. Because you have the responsibility of the people and the boat. But you still want to fight for the first place. It's a balance between speed and safety. When we have 40 knots we know what sail to use. But then we have a gust to 55, and we have to react. But that's part of the Volvo Ocean Race. Horace talks below in Mandarin. Pascal, at nav station, talks in French while demonstrating something involving chart/routing software.Xabi, below, talks about how they were preparing for a gybe, putting in a second reef so it would be safer, and the mast track came unglued, like it did for AkzoNobel in Leg 3. Pretty disappointed, but reacted well. Got the main on the lock on the second reef and ratcheted the track. Now are sailing with the FR0 and double-reefed main. Plan is to keep sailing hard, because these are good conditions to stay with the fleet. After the Horn can maybe do something with glue to repair. Trying very hard to stay in the race. He then repeats the explanation in Spanish.Washing machine on deck. Below, someone digs around in the gear while the engine runs. Alberto and Abby work on the sail in the bow. Abby: Always something to do. Small tear in the J2 that needs fixing. And AIS isn't working, which is a real hindrance in terms of seeing the rest of the fleet. Working through these mishaps. Sewing the sail. Definitely getting colder, a lot of condensation inside the boat. Carlo working on the foredeck. Peter, below, talks about being only 150-200 miles off the ice gate. At some point going to have to move toward Cape Horn. And are going to get rolled over by a front. And a gybing frenzy. Routing it isn't the most simple crossing. I think we're all going to be tired by the time we get to Cape Horn. I don't think anybody is ready for six days of gybing; I think we'll all be pretty broken by the time we get there. But I think it will be good fun a good challenge. Kyle (hard to identify, because his name has worn off the back of his foulies) clambers out to the clew. Washing machine.Kyle works on the clew of the MH0 (leech line?) while Alberto helps him. Alberto: Strange feeling now that the next land will be Cape Horn. Talks about going south; cold, big breeze. Abby, with windswept hair, talks about making the most of the sun and warmth while they can. "After a pretty heinous 24 hours of bouncing around." Kyle, in the dusk: Saying good bye to New Zealand. Going to a very remote part of the world. Compass rose closeup. Crew below getting undressed, workin on something in a headlamp. Abby getting doused in the pit. Slomo washing machine. Crash cam from the stern of Thomas being washed off the aft pedestal. Thomas, below, talks in French.Dongfeng tacks from starboard to port as Sam shoots forward from the stern. Then we see them tacking back the other way with land to starboard. AkzoNobel crosses them. Sunset. Pascal and Horace grinding. Horace talks about getting his hair cut on February 2 in China, and put something to remind him: "V" for victory. Reminder to sail the boat faster. A comeptitor on the horizon ahead of them. Daryl, on the helm in the sunset, talks about the first part of the leg being difficult. Not as bad a sea state as they'd expected, but a lot of maneuvers and a lot of tacks. "And about that much sleep." (Makes a zero with his hand.) Now around East Cape, and the next landfall is Cape Horn. Chasing down MAPFRE. Kevin, on deck: Next 3 days should be quite simple, going straight south to the ice limit. Then a front and a completely different story, forecast for quite windy conditions. Now is a chance to sleep and get some rest. When you have a lot of wind and have to do a lot of gybes, can get tired very quickly. Below, someone eating (not sure who).Dongfeng tacks from starboard to port as Sam shoots forward from the stern. Then we see them tacking back the other way with land to starboard. AkzoNobel crosses them. Sunset. Pascal and Horace grinding. Horace talks about getting his hair cut on February 2 in China, and put something to remind him: "V" for victory. Reminder to sail the boat faster. A comeptitor on the horizon ahead of them. Daryl, on the helm in the sunset, talks about the first part of the leg being difficult. Not as bad a sea state as they'd expected, but a lot of maneuvers and a lot of tacks. "And about that much sleep." (Makes a zero with his hand.) Now around East Cape, and the next landfall is Cape Horn. Chasing down MAPFRE. Kevin, on deck: Next 3 days should be quite simple, going straight south to the ice limit. Then a front and a completely different story, forecast for quite windy conditions. Now is a chance to sleep and get some rest. When you have a lot of wind and have to do a lot of gybes, can get tired very quickly. Below, someone eating (not sure who).Liz, below, explains that they're actually closer to Cape Horn than to Capetown by a few hundred miles, and (on starboard) they're actually on layline [for Cape Horn]. "So I gave Dee the option, in case she wants to go around the world the wrong way again." Sterncam view looking forward. Below, Liz talks about seeing more rubbish in the water, and being curious what they're microplastic filter picks up. Liz: "It's pretty sad." Henry, stacking from starboard to port below, explains that they're going to gybe. On deck, we see the gybe. Dee jokes about the being closer to Cape Horn and her reputation for going the wrong way round. Nicolas jokes about how he's out of the cabin. Dee, with the sunset behind her, talks about how people are happier now that they're actually heading for their destination rather than away from it. Lucas: "Well, wind's dying; we're fucked. What else do you want me to say?" Sam, to Henry: "We just made really good miles to Capetown, right?" Henry (snorts): "For 10 minutes." Lucas, as they're back on starboard sailing towad the sunset: "Gybe, gybe, gybe, no sleep, french alarm clock, loss, loss, gybe, think we're winning, going to Cape Town, gybe, no wind, loss, Scallywag, bye. That way." (pointing ahead). Shots of Scallywag in the dusk, crossing them on port, then to leeward and ahead of them after gybing back to starboard. Lucas, in the last light of day: "Add a little tag on the end. Gybe, gybe, gybe, choke - no. Not choke. They choked. [coughs] Scallway, coughing. Here they are, right there. We're gonna roll them, right now. Let's go."