Below, Kevin talks about being tired. "With my watch partner Carolijn Brouwer we have been 12 hours on deck - 14, 2 more. Lots of gybes along the ice limit. Now we are getting more pressure, sea state." Now 2 hours of rest before being back on deck, then one very important gybe before heading north for Australia. Carolijn: "I think I have to admit I'm pretty tired now. All the action on deck seems to happen when Kevin and I are off watch. But it's part of the job and you ahve to get it done. It's part of the race." In the Southern Ocean it's harder because of getting dressed and undressed. "When you do that every 2 hours it gets a bit frustrating. In other legs it's much less a problem... There's a lot more layers coming on than otherwise.... Have to push really hard. The guys on MAPFRE have done really well." Fabien talks in French. Black talks about normal life on board. Having to be ready. Eating a lot of food with no rice (?). Pascal talks in French.Pascal, at the nav station, puts on a headset. He announces something we hear booming through a PA system. "20 minutes before the gybe. 20 minutes." Jack, waking up in his bunk. Carolijn and Black getting dressed. Marie getting dressed. Pascal over the PA: "Three minutes." Crew goes on deck, perfoms the gybe. Below, we see Marie climbing back into her bunk. Pascal, over the PA: "Okay; in about 20 minutes [?] another gybe." Time lapse shot of repeated gybes with short intervals between them.At nav station, Charlie explains to Sam that there aren't a lot of decisions to make right now; they're just pushing the boat for boatspeed as they parallel the ice limit. Decisions to be made shortly about where to go later. Risk/reward analysis changes based on waht happens at the back of the fleet behind them. On deck, Jena steers on port gybe in about 15 knots of wind under a cloudy sky. Then TJ (invisible in balacava; thank goodness for accents) steers and talks about Jena, about getting her time on the helm when conditions aren't too technical. By the end, he says, she'll be driving as much as anyone else. Nick, on the stern, says he wants Chuy to start a men's fashion line. Has him model his baseball cap stitched onto a neoprene balaclava (as described by Tony). Some discussion of Tron that I didn't really understand. Then SiFi talks about trying to catch the two red boats ahead (though unfortunately Vestas has less wind), and about Brunel about 20 miles behind them. Future wind prospects. Nick and SiFi, in the companionway. Nick: "This boat is a prison." SiFi: "There's no escape."Below, Pablo talks in Spanish. (Same as the previous video, where he talked in English about keeping their clothes on when off watch because they were going up to gybe every hour.)Wake shot as MAPFRE sails fast with the sun setting behind them. Blair, below in a red light, talks about how it's hard to know when the day started; 12, 24, 36 hours. Gybing every hour if you're on watch; if you're off-watch trying to get down below and get a quick bite to eat, get in your bunk as quick as you can. Louis prepares something to eat in the galley in the light of his headlamp. "Managed to make some pretty good gains on Dongfeng so we're pushing hard." Pablo, standing near the hatch: "Two hours" (until the next gybe). Blair: "Two hours? That can't be right. It's too long!" Támara laughs. Louis asks Jen what's in the food bin behind her. Jen: "Pasta bolognese." Blair hands it out. Later, Jen asks Pablo how he's feeling. "We have just started so at the moment not too bad. We are wet, tired and hungry, all of us. The good thing is it is not that cold anymore. Doing all these aneavers we are quite warm. But there's 18 hours to go, so this is nothing." Talks about hwo it's important to do all these maneuvers to stay close to Dongfeng along the ice limit. Talks about how it's helpful that they're so close by so they can see if they're gaining or losing. Birds astern. Blair talks about getting back in his gear; Willy kids him. Pablo, below, talks about watches. We see footage on deck of a gybe while his audio continues. Have to keep the clothes on because the maneuvers are so frequent. On deck, Xabi talks to Jen with the sunrise behind him: "We've got 20 more of those coming, today and tomorrow. So that's good. Plenty of power here."Slomo shot of waves through the wheel. Interesting slowed-down audio. An albatross flies by. Slomo grinding. Slomo faces; Carolijn on the helm. Slomo trimming. Below, Carolijn takes off her gear. She talks to Martin; behind Fabien is making food in the galley. Carolijn: "Yes, it's painful. Not necessarily painful, it's just tough. It's very tiring. You get to a certain stage where you're so tired that you start tripping over your own feet. If you don't watch out it can be quite dangerous." Talks about even 20 minutes lying down in your bunk, even if you don't sleep, helps you get the energy to make the next gybe. "I've lost count. I don't even know if we're halfway yet. Just in the last 3 hours of my off watch we've done 6 gybes?... Entertaining stuff." Fabien eats with a bit of a 1,000-yard stare. (Looking at the tracker through this section it's been brutal; Dongfeng and MAPFRE are at the front of the fleet within AIS range of each other having a running gybing battle to see who can stay closer to the exclusion zone.) Pascal, below, drops his head and rubs it. Looks tired. We pull back and see he's watching Charles at the nav station from his bunk. Charles talks to Martin: "It's very simple. During 30 hours we're having to gybe every hour so it's a nightmare. Not very funny but we have no choice. We have the ice limit for a good reason... You have to stack every time, 600 kilos each time... You don't manage to sleep... That's life at the extreme for sure. On the positive side, we are ahead with MAPFRE and fighting for the first place, so it's good."Below, on port gybe, Pablo gets dressed in his bunk above the nav station. Kyle stands in the galley eating something. Pablo explains the importance of getting the boots and pants just right so they don't get wet. Because once it gets wet it's wet. A little break is enough. He then explains the same thing in Spanish.Kyle getting dressed below. He talks about how the water temperature is 6 degrees. Miserable on deck. Good motivatino to keep grinding. Carlo, below, talks about how cold it is. Kyle lists the layers of clothes he's wearing. "Rugged up as much as possible. But you still get wet, and cold." More getting dressed. "I think the worst thingis putting on a wet balaclava." He goes on deck. Carlo: "The best thing when you come inside is that you're not on deck, getting firehosed all the time. But the worst thing is you have to take off all your gear, and it takes 30 minutes." He takes off his gloves, shows his hands. He talks about how little cuts from on shore become infected. "You have to take care of your hands." We see Alberto below.Shot of foulies hanging below. On deck, Sophie is bundled up. She talks about how it's become colder and all the clothes she's wearing. Not going to go much further south, though. Pretty cold at night, but not as bad in the day. Windier, so wet, so that adds to the cold. Támara, in a cowl, puts sunscreen (?) on her lips and cheeks. Slomo closeup of Rob scowling in his ear-flaps hat. Below, in the galley, Ñeti makes coffee. He talks in Spanish. On deck, trimming the mainsheet, he drinks it. From the cabin, he hoists his coffee mug to the camera.On deck during a rain shower (with sun and blue sky in the background) Kyle, shirtless, showers in the water dripping from the main. Alberto steers in light airs. Bow shot with the stack forward in about 5 knots of wind. Below, Peter works on a metal part held by vice grips. (Update: Per Bouwe's text update today, believe this was Peter repairing the broken end of the outrigger.) Abby below in the bow, laundry hanging below. On deck, shot of the runner blocks with clothes hanging from the stern lifeline. Maciel stands in the pit. POV GoPro shot of someone (not sure who) up the mast checking the rigging.Horace, on deck, talks about how now that it's calmed down and sunny everyone is trying to dry out their wet clothes. Jack looks at his sunglasses. Below, Charles sleeps in his bunk. Pascal lies down next to other sleeping crew. Boots and clothing laid out to dry on deck, on top of the cabin.Shot of Stacey's hat drying on a winch in the cockpit. Stacy talks in the cockpit about how it was wet for the first few days, and now they're able to dry stuff out. Shot below of a damaged sail being dried out, and an inflated PFD. Nick, shirtless in the bow, talks about the PFD: "We were doing a peel the other day, and Tom decided he didn't want to be part of the bow team any more, so he automatically inflated, and became part of the back of the boat... So basically we hang this up to remind Tom of his weak moment. Tom: "I believe I completed the peel." Shots of Tom, Stacey, and Nick patching the sail in the bow. Stacey, back in the cockpit, talks about getting better rest and food now that conditions have improved. POV shot of Martin preparing food in the galley. Shot of someone sleeping below with sea boots hanging next to them. Tom, at the wheel, talks about airing his boots out, and giving his feet "some aeration". Shot of Tom's bare feet. Shot of Tom adjusting keel (for less heel?); you can hear the engine running to power the hydraulics. Stacey moves some socks while joking about "maybe you and he can have a competition." Martin: "Are those yours, Stacey?" Stacey: "No; I think they might be Tony's. I'm not breathing, though." Shot of Tony (I think) below, watching a video on a tablet on the bottom of the bunk above him. In the cockpit, SiFi explains to Nick how some bit of dental-repair filling has come out of his mouth where a wisdom tooth was recently extracted and the hole filled in. He shows Martin the bit of stuff from his pocket. SiFi: "A replacement part of my face."