Vestas sails fast on starboard gybe with a reefed main (I think?). Slomo washing machine shot from behind the helm. TJ, below, is eating. On screen title: Tom Johnson presents / A Christmas Story. Tom: "Hello Sam, said TJ. There once was a boy trying to make it home for Christmas." Stacey, eating below, talks about how they're 2 days away from Christmas. Stacey explains that she's not from that part of Australia, but a family is coming to see her. TJ talks about the big, cold low-pressure system that prevented them from gybing to get north. Shot on deck shows helmsman NOT standing on the helm platform, but instead on a stacked sail. Below, Sam asks Stacey, "Motivation to go faster?" Stacey: "Yeah. We've been down in the cold too long, and we're pretty keen to get out of there... Any minute now it's gonna be balmy and warm." Below, Tony eats, and explains that real Christmas for him is getting away with the family for a summer holiday. Stacey jokes that this isn't warm. Tony exhales so you can see his breath. TJ keeps telling his Christmas story, trying to get there to see his family on Christmas. Father and mother; his sister he hasn't seen for 3 years. And his niece Lucille that he's never even met. Talks about that being a hard thing about his job: Always moving. Charlie talks with Simon (off camera) about how they should do stealth mode now, becaue once MAPFRE is within 200 miles of the finish it will end. TJ talks about stealth mode. Charlie talks about how they've decided when to gybe, strategic consideration with Brunel. TJ: "TJ's storytelling voice... You'll find out how the story ends in a couple of days. Hopefully it's a happy story." Tony on the helm. TJ: "He's bringing his sled. A big sled, Vestas Wind."Condensation dripping inside from a grab rail. Firehose shot of the foredeck while Vestas is triple-heading. SiFi, unrecognizable in his balaclava except by voice, talks about how they're now drag-racing, not gybing. "We're starting to pin our ears back and sail fast." On the stern, Tony talks about the current conditions. He asks the termperature; Stacey answers "Nine and nine." Tony explains: 9 degrees C air, 9 degrees water. He talks about how even with all the layers you get cold, but if you move you get hot and then sweat, and then you get wet and cold again. Tony talks about his 3-day-old protein bar he's found in his pocket and is going to eat. Stacey says she can do better: Pulls out a bar. "Tropical holiday."Below, on port gybe, Pablo gets dressed in his bunk above the nav station. Kyle stands in the galley eating something. Pablo explains the importance of getting the boots and pants just right so they don't get wet. Because once it gets wet it's wet. A little break is enough. He then explains the same thing in Spanish.Kyle getting dressed below. He talks about how the water temperature is 6 degrees. Miserable on deck. Good motivatino to keep grinding. Carlo, below, talks about how cold it is. Kyle lists the layers of clothes he's wearing. "Rugged up as much as possible. But you still get wet, and cold." More getting dressed. "I think the worst thingis putting on a wet balaclava." He goes on deck. Carlo: "The best thing when you come inside is that you're not on deck, getting firehosed all the time. But the worst thing is you have to take off all your gear, and it takes 30 minutes." He takes off his gloves, shows his hands. He talks about how little cuts from on shore become infected. "You have to take care of your hands." We see Alberto below.Preparing to go on deck, Francesca jokes about her wearing sunglasses and not being able to see but them keeping her warm. "I doubt all be able to see any people. At the first wave. I can see something. It's nice... Sunglasses keep me warm. It's a hard life." Dee, off camera, laughs with her. Someone else (Jérémie the OBR?) calls out, "Good luck, Frankie." She waves back. "Thank you very much. Grazie mille." She blows a kiss and goes out the hatch. Dee points and laughs. Francesca pokes her head back in the hatch. Her life vest has deployed. "I'm back." We see her below getting out of the life vest. Crash cam footage from the stern as they nosedive and broach on port gybe. Below (presumably during the same or a similar incident), we see a crewmember in the gally slip and fall to starboard. Dee calls out, "Are you allright?" She explains that in these conditions doing a Chinese gybe would be catastrophic. Boom would come across, hit the runner, boat would lie on its side, probably break all the battens and if not damage the main. "And everyone would not know what to do and would rattle about like headless chickens. Be panicking. Becuase while the boat's on its side it would probably be filling with water. And we're doing a good job of that just sailing. So the potential for damage is huge, and we're pretty happy it didn't happen." Ah: Now we see crash cam/stern cam footage of them gybing accidentally from starboard to port, but then immediately recovering and gybing back again without rounding down while people in the pit scurry around. Voices: "Oh fuck." "Main on!" (pause) Liz, I think, sounding calm. "We just gybed."Sophie, below, stands close to the companionway. She is turning her head under a blast of air associated with the running engine, maybe? "I just found my hair dryer. It's so good. Ah! Who needs the hairdresser? For the first time getting dry hair. It's getting pretty cold out actually. I'd say the water is 5 degrees or colder. The Southern Ocean's awesome. We are making a lot of miles very quickly. We're going good I think. The albatross are pretty cool. There's like 10 of them following the boat. It's super cool. But it's pretty wet and a little relentless. It's what we expect I guess. It's a little crazy." Intercut with shot of the cockpit, slomo washing machine, albatrosses behind the boat. Nice portrait by Jen of my unproblematic fave.SiFi sits at the nav station looking at a routing screen on the computer. His breath is visibly fogging due to the cold. "It looks like we're walking the line between speed and safety reasonably well." Slomo of his breath fogging. With low sun behind them as they stand on the stern, Charlie and SiFi talk about a problem with the main. "There's so much friction on it on the spreaders and shit it's probably not going anywhere." Nick talks about a couple of squall lines came through, up to 45 knots. And going onto the third reef the headboard of the mainsail isn't going onto lock. Mark: "Well, we've got 44 knots, and if you look this way there's a massive cloud, and the water's more white than blue." Charlie jokes about not saying "white squall". Slomo. Sam to Mark: "How is it being down here?" Mark: "It's everything you'd expect. Windy, cold, we've got 48 knots right now. Look upwind. It's crazy. Doing 30 knots of boatspeed. It's pretty crazy, but somehow everything's still in control." Slomo wake.In the cockpit (trimming the main, I suspect) Alberto talks about the next 24 hours as they head toward the depression. "At least for the moment it's still warm." Chuckles. Peter, sitting on the low side of the pit, talks about how conditions are going to change completely in the next day. Slightly lifting at the moment, later will gybe over, then on port will see "first bit of real Southern Ocean action for the leg. Yeah; it's gonna be pretty windy." Has his warm clothing downstairs. So far pretty nice this trip. Looking after the boat. Shot of someone working the bow in spray. Alberto grinding. Shifting the stack aft. Carlo working the clew of the headsail on a halyard. Abby repairing the pit winch. A rainbow ahead of them.Drone shot of AkzoNobel with sunrise ahead of them. Distant shot of TTToP to leeward as AkzoNobel sails on port tack. Peter, on a pedestal: "After almost 7,000 miles it's pretty impressive to see the competitors nearby." Luke: "The racing in the Volvo 65's is close because they're all one-design." Talks about TTToP, and Scallywag being in stealth mode. Peter: "Looks like every 10 years I'm back in this race." Luke: "It's gotten a lot colder now that we're going upwind." Talks about wearing surgical gloves under the other gloves to increase the warmth. Peter, smiling: "I didn't bring gloves."Kyle gets dressed below in the full-on gasketed foulies. Talks about the competition. Peter, below, talks about opportunities when it goes light again. Bouwe, below, talks about their choosing a more northern line. Peter and Kyle talk about how bad the conditions are on deck. Slomo washing machine footage of cockpit, shifting the stack. Annie: "Don't go to the death zone. Also known as the bow." Stack. Coiling line. Slomo winch. Abby rubs water from her face. Bouwe on the helm. Slomo washing machine in the cockpit, grinding.Slomo shot of a dark albatross gliding in their wake. Emily, below, getting out of her bunk: "It's cold." Jules, at the nav station, talks about how they're still riding the front, but have high pressure a few days ahead. Simeon repairs some piece of gear, hands it to someone, and talks about the upcoming winds and strategy. "In general we've been sailing the boat well." Nicho, on the stern: "Number one challenge is how we're gonna get ahead of some of the boats ahead of us." Talks about how boats can get stuck in the approach to Cape Town. Slomo of spray coming into the cockpit.Below, Horace talks about being south, and it getting colder and windier. Horace: "I prefer cold more than hot." Jérémie, below, eats and talks in French. Horace: "If we sail fast, maybe four and a half days. And if we sail slow will be 5 days or 8 days more." Slomo washing machine shot of the cockpit from the cabin, and then from the cockpit looking forward. Horace on the aft pedestal. Slomo shots of spray from the mast. Marie on the helm, looking forward.Below, Stacey puts on multiple layers of cold-weather foulies. She talks about how it's a long process getting dressed. Stacey: "Like Charlie said it's Monday; we've got one week of work and then we're on vacation." Shots of the crew in the cockpit as Vestas sails fast on port gybe. Wake. Washing machine. Tony on the helm. Tony goes below, takes off his cowl. "Wow. Another wet one." Tony talks about their performance being good, good scheds, 24-hour longest run possibility. Says there's a sched coming in now. Tony takes off his foulies and layers. Jena talks about how it's cold, but fast, and that a sched is coming in. "Hopefully still fast." Charlie, in his bunk, looks at SiFi at the nav station. SiFi: "Yeah; we're longest run again." Later he talks to Martin: "We're going well in this windy stuff which is nice. It's a race to the east, to stay in front of the front." Talks about it being tricky, needing to try to avoid the high pressure above and behind. "A couple of days of fast sailing, then it's going to get tricky."Shot of foulies hanging below. On deck, Sophie is bundled up. She talks about how it's become colder and all the clothes she's wearing. Not going to go much further south, though. Pretty cold at night, but not as bad in the day. Windier, so wet, so that adds to the cold. Támara, in a cowl, puts sunscreen (?) on her lips and cheeks. Slomo closeup of Rob scowling in his ear-flaps hat. Below, in the galley, Ñeti makes coffee. He talks in Spanish. On deck, trimming the mainsheet, he drinks it. From the cabin, he hoists his coffee mug to the camera.Nicho, on deck as AkzoNobel sails on starboard gybe in 10 knots of wind: "The last sched dropped us from first to fifth... The game is to set ourselves up for the next front." Simeon talks about the next 24-48 hours, and how they've stacked the sails smaller so they can get them further astern. Emily: "I'm expecting it to get a lot windier and a lot colder. So I've got two sets of thermals I've been saving up for the whole trip." Brad, below, says he's been saving thermals. Nicolai, below, also says he's been saving up a new set of thermals he'll be pulling out. Shot up the slot at AkzoNobel triple-heading on starboard.