Joan talks below in Spanish. Lots of mention of wind. Rob, below: Right now we're not in great shape. The leaders, first 3 boats, have extended quite a lot. That may change in the ridge. Dongfeng not that far away. Scallywag probably going to overtake us in the next sched. Dee not far away. Podium still a possibility, but we're going to have to get some luck with the upcoming ridge. Joan talks more in Spanish; discusses the limit of the Gulf Stream. Rob: Had a very cold night last night. Water was down to zero at one stage. Passed an iceberg; could see it on the radar. Water's probably 10 or 12 now. More Joan in Spanish. Washing machine shots of the cockpit from the hatch. Slomo washing machine. Neti grinding. Crew putting on foulies below. Stern cam shots of big spray. Sail change: Hoisting the FR0. Sophie wrestling the sail. Spreader cam shots of the sail change. Drone shots of them triple-heading wiht the FR0 and full main: Must be in lighter wind than some of the other boats. Looks like 20 knots of wind or less from the sea surface. Favoriting for those drone shots at the end.Charlie and Mark get geared up for going on watch. Mark talks about it getting colder, bumpy, and windy. Broad reaching in 25/30 knots. Converging with the other group they had the big split with. Trying to maximize this wind while they have it, before they hit the high-pressure ridge.Bleddyn: 24 hours after the start. Lots of fog. Haven't seen other boats. Split this morning; we've gybed heading more northeast. Other guys are still going southeast. Expect they'll come north at some point. We're in lighter breeze, but we're going in the right direction, which is a positive. Crew in the cockpit talks and laughs about Welsh. Bleddyn gives langauge lessons to Bianca. Lucas, trimming the main, talks about hearing Bleddyn talking on the phone in what he thought was English, but then not being able to understand any of it. Lucas: "Wave. Main on." Surfing. Lucas sings "Surfing USA". Dee comes up with the latest sched. Everyone else is still sailing together in the better pressure. We fell out of the pressure, and we have the shift so we had to gybe. Hopes they'll come together and have a restart. Lucas talks about going north, and splitting, which will be cold. Annalise: Not looking forward to the cold. So it better work out for us. Bernardo working in the pit, tidying lines. Stacking forward. Liz slaps Bernardo on the back. Liz: "Nice one." Bernardo: I started sailing in Portugal when I was 8 years old. I wanted to start before that but my parents didn't allow me. So when I turned 8 I started straight away sailing the Optis. My background was always dinghies: Optis, 420s, 470s, a bit of Laser, then did the Olympics (London 2012) in 49er. Then did Youth America's Cup, World Match Racing Tour, and chasing a little bit this world, more big boats. I tried to do the last race. I couldn't make it. And fortunately this time I got my chance, my opportunity. And this is a lifetime opportunity, a dream come true. Not only a challenge, the toughest race on earth, but it's a ride with a big team, where the teamwork makes a big difference. Most is how to manage yourself. It's a challenge in a lot of different ways. That's what makes me wake up every day. Best memory: Arriving in Lisbon, in my home port. Getting home on the first leg of the Volvo means a lot. Toughest moment: When we lost John Fish. It's hard to believe and understand that he's gone. That was a really hard and a sad moment. Liz: Why did we choose Bernard? Mostly his good looks. We needed a charmer on board. Someone who could sell ice to Eskimos... Needed people who have their mind on the game, looking for the next step, on the right side of the shift. A key person to have around.Parade. Dee hugs Trystan; they joke about the race of the Welshmen (Bleddyn and Trystan). Witty's goodbye kisses. Dockout. Ben talks about the fog. Trystan talks about coming from Wales, a stopover in Cardiff. Was always in his mind to do this leg. He talks about Bleddyn, and how there's a rivalry between the two. Libby: First few days is about wriggling throgh exclusion zones. All the boats in a line. Then building breeze over the next few days. Libby with her tablet in the cockpit. Witty: Really really cold, and really really cold, and really really cold. Just stay patient and stay with the fleet and grind it away. You won't see the Scallywags doing anything different this time. He grabs the wheel. Start. Antonio on the rail with the boats lined up for the start.Light conditions as Brunel sails east with dusk behind them. Below, Bouwe talks about how it's a little unfair because the boats behind will get the front first. But that's racing. Crew on the foredeck in new wind struggles to make a sail change. Bouwe: In the South Atlantic. Water in still cold. Some felt like yesterday was the coldest day of sailing. Will last for another 24 hours before we can finally turn north. More shots of crew working on the foredeck, at the mast. Bouwe: Final outlook for the leg. Last 200 miles it will be game on. Big separations. Will be interesting. Crew stacking on deck. Kyle: Just heard that Vestas dropped their rig. No injuries, which is good. But tragic for those guys. Reminds us to check to make sure we stay in one piece.Stern cam / crash cam shot of MAPFRE sailing on port gybe. There's a bang, and the boom drops and the main flops. This must have been when the head of the main tore free. A crewmember shouts: "Aaaaahhhh!" GoPro (Garmin) shot from the crewmember up the mast (Ñeti?). "¡Un poquito!" There's glue and stuff on the mast. The torn upper edge of the lower part of the main is visible. They approach their support boat at anchor. Drone shots of them rafted alongside. Someone on the shore team talks in Spanish. Pablo: In one sense we were lucky to break so close by. Ñeti, covered in glue, talks about the attempt to repair the mast. He's more concerned about the mainsail. It's in two pieces. Quite a tricky repair with the material they have here and where they are. And it's quite cold, so curing is hard. In the dark, Xabi talks in Spanish about the repair attempts. I think he said departing in half an hour. Shots of them working on the mainsail. Glue, hot air gun, cluing the mast track. Time-lapse shot of them working on the mainsail repair. They pull away from the support boat in the night with wind howling around them.Spreader cam view as Vestas surfs. Washing machine shots, slomo washing machine. Phil, below: Cape Horn's a big day in any sailor's life. This is going to be the fourth time I'm around it. Last time with Abu Dhabi, Chuy Bermudez was on the radio with the lighthouse keeper, and apparenlty it's voluntary thing for 12 months. He'd been there with his wife and kids for nearly a year. Slomo in the cockpit. Hannah, below, talks about Cape Horn. She had no idea how tough it was going to be. So windy, waves like nothing she's ever seen before, non-stop. Surfing shots on deck, grinding. SiFi, below: One of the toughest Southern Ocean legs I've ever done. Relentlessness of it, constant high winds, cold, snow. People have been doing a great job to battle on. Reaching the Horn will be a good moment to celebrate and reflect on the leg so far. Slomo washing machine in the cockpit.Stern cam/crash cam view of them stuffing into a wave. Liz, below, shows her bandaged right wrist. Liz: I was trimming the main, and Freddy got taken off the wheel by a massive wave and crushed my arm into the runner. [Note: the crash cam footage appears not to show that incident, but I guess Sam included it because it shows a big wave washing through the cockpit?] We don't really know what I've done to it yet, but it's pretty useless. Photos of Liz's arm. Dee bandages her; talks about how they don't know if she broke it or not. Liz says, "this is gonna make me invicible." Dee jokes about having to manage it. Liz, on the stern, about wanting to join in on the action. Below, she talks about how it's frustrating; can't drive, trim, or grind. She shows her swollen hand. Sam: "Yikes." Night vision view of the cockpit. And then of Liz, one-handed, trying to stack. Lucas: Pretty damn cold, frankly. Haven't been able to feel my fingers for the last hour and a half. [Note: this video apparently appears twice in the Raw Content feed. I've deleted the later one from the spreadsheet.]Stern cam/crash cam view of them stuffing into a wave. Liz, below, shows her bandaged right wrist. Liz: I was trimming the main, and Freddy got taken off the wheel by a massive wave and crushed my arm into the runner. [Note: the crash cam footage appears not to show that incident, but I guess Sam included it because it shows a big wave washing through the cockpit?] We don't really know what I've done to it yet, but it's pretty useless. Photos of Liz's arm. Dee bandages her; talks about how they don't know if she broke it or not. Liz says, "this is gonna make me invicible." Dee jokes about having to manage it. Liz, on the stern, about wanting to join in on the action. Below, she talks about how it's frustrating; can't drive, trim, or grind. She shows her swollen hand. Sam: "Yikes." Night vision view of the cockpit. And then of Liz, one-handed, trying to stack. Lucas: Pretty damn cold, frankly. Haven't been able to feel my fingers for the last hour and a half. [Note: this video apparently appears twice in the Raw Content feed. I've deleted the later one from the spreadsheet.]Annemieke, trimming the main on the stern, and Ben, steering, shout, "Point Nemo!" as waves wash over them. Below, Annemieke explains about Point Nemo: Farthest point from land on earth. Fish, below: "Not many people come to such remote spots on the planet. So, you know, it is a weird thing, but it's not something we dwell too much on to be honest." Washing machine shots on deck. Fish: "The cold is one thing that affects people in different ways. Some people struggle and go crazy with it. Others battle through. I think Bessie's used to the harsh winters of Holland. She seems to always be with a smile on her face. Which is quite infectious. But others are struggling, to say the least. The Antipodeans, they don't like it." Witty, below: When I grew up my mother had three brass monkeys on the windowsill in the kitchen. Hear no evil, see no evil, speak no evil. "And it's that cold, it's frozen the balls off a brass monkey." Alex talks about how it was 3°. "Bloody cold." Talks about spending short little stints down below, 15 minutes, to have a breather and warm up while on watch. Washing machine shots of grinding in the pit.Drone shots of AkzoNobel surfing big waves in the sun. On deck with Nicho on the helm, we see a squall coming. Nicolai: We've got a bit of hail coming. In a squall usually it's rain, but in the Southern Ocean it's hail. Hurts when it hits you in the head. Slomo shots of hail/snow. Martine (I think?) shakes her hands. "My hands are freezing. It hurts." Nicolai talks about easing the sheet, keeping the wind at 75 apparent. More drone shots of them surfing. Below, Martine squeezes water from her pigtails. "For a Brazilian this is very cold. I've never sialed in this cold before. I was freezing my hands outside. It was pretty cool; we had a pretty cool watch." Nicho, below, talks about gaining bearing. How it's funny that if they sail fast it's safer. If you have a breakage and slow down it's more dangerous, as they found in leg 3. [Favoriting for the epic drone shots and squall/snow.]Drone shots of AkzoNobel surfing big waves in the sun. On deck with Nicho on the helm, we see a squall coming. Nicolai: We've got a bit of hail coming. In a squall usually it's rain, but in the Southern Ocean it's hail. Hurts when it hits you in the head. Slomo shots of hail/snow. Martine (I think?) shakes her hands. "My hands are freezing. It hurts." Nicolai talks about easing the sheet, keeping the wind at 75 apparent. More drone shots of them surfing. Below, Martine squeezes water from her pigtails. "For a Brazilian this is very cold. I've never sialed in this cold before. I was freezing my hands outside. It was pretty cool; we had a pretty cool watch." Nicho, below, talks about gaining bearing. How it's funny that if they sail fast it's safer. If you have a breakage and slow down it's more dangerous, as they found in leg 3. [Favoriting for the epic drone shots and squall/snow.]Rob, in red light below, says as expected wind has built to 35-40 knots. Borderline survival conditions. Willy, below, talks in Spanish. Pablo, below, talks in Spanish. Something involving his gloves. Sophie, below, says when you're holding the mainsheet it's always wet. "For me that's the coldest time for my hands. It's basically painful." The other thing about doing the main, she says, is that you're not really moving. "So after an hour and a half of that you get pretty cold." Willy talks in Spanish. Rob: In previous Southern Ocean legs got massive torrents of water through the boat, wiping out the helmsman. So we've built a wave breaker, which is on leeward side now so it's useless. Slomo shots on deck. Shot of the "wave breaker" (a mesh on the railing in front of the wheel) on the starboard (leeward) wheel.Slomo washing machine in the cockpit, with camera being washed into th wheel. Below, Stacey: "It's hard work, actually." Surfing and plowing into the waves brings water over the deck. It's cold, and 45 knots. More slomo washing machine shots. Someone on the stern (I think Phil?), trimming the main, has a whole discussion about how bad the conditions are, how it's cold and no one's talking. "Am I scared? No. A little bit bored and friggin' cold." This isn't his idea of an ocean race to Brazil. "How many days is it to Cape Horn? Four." He calls out to TJ on the pedestal: Which would he prefer: the doldrums or this? TJ: "Neither!" Nick: "We went from 8 miles behind Dongfeng, took our mainsail down, and somehow ended up 3 miles behind them." Jeremie laughs; "maybe take the main down!" Nick: "That's what we said; make it way easier." Slomo washing machine. Favoriting for Jeremie's getting out in the elements and getting such good personal stuff; really conveys what it feels like to be in the cockpit on these boats in these conditions.Rob, in red light below, says as expected wind has built to 35-40 knots. Borderline survival conditions. Willy, below, talks in Spanish. Pablo, below, talks in Spanish. Something involving his gloves. Sophie, below, says when you're holding the mainsheet it's always wet. "For me that's the coldest time for my hands. It's basically painful." The other thing about doing the main, she says, is that you're not really moving. "So after an hour and a half of that you get pretty cold." Willy talks in Spanish. Rob: In previous Southern Ocean legs got massive torrents of water through the boat, wiping out the helmsman. So we've built a wave breaker, which is on leeward side now so it's useless. Slomo shots on deck. Shot of the "wave breaker" (a mesh on the railing in front of the wheel) on the starboard (leeward) wheel.Slomo washing machine in the cockpit, with camera being washed into th wheel. Below, Stacey: "It's hard work, actually." Surfing and plowing into the waves brings water over the deck. It's cold, and 45 knots. More slomo washing machine shots. Someone on the stern (I think Phil?), trimming the main, has a whole discussion about how bad the conditions are, how it's cold and no one's talking. "Am I scared? No. A little bit bored and friggin' cold." This isn't his idea of an ocean race to Brazil. "How many days is it to Cape Horn? Four." He calls out to TJ on the pedestal: Which would he prefer: the doldrums or this? TJ: "Neither!" Nick: "We went from 8 miles behind Dongfeng, took our mainsail down, and somehow ended up 3 miles behind them." Jeremie laughs; "maybe take the main down!" Nick: "That's what we said; make it way easier." Slomo washing machine. Favoriting for Jeremie's getting out in the elements and getting such good personal stuff; really conveys what it feels like to be in the cockpit on these boats in these conditions.Crew gets gear on below. Lucas: Out there it's pretty wild at the moment. 30-35 knots of wind; boat's doing 30-35 knots down the waves. Half the time you're not really in control. Just hanging on for dear life. But it's fun. Brian, getting dressed: Pretty spectacular downwind sailing. We're going to be sailing downwind for the next 2000 miles to Cape Horn. Pretty spectacular. Brian: Few things less fun than pulling off wet foul weather gear... Once they get on deck it gets a whole lot better. But the act of getting on the gear is not fun. Bianca: My hands are sore. My neck is sore... She gets her gear on. Lucas talks about how getting your kit on to go on deck is at least a half-hour operation. Like trying to get dressed standing on the back of a flatbed truck going 100kph down a bumpy road. Smallest moves become nearly impossible. Bianca: Pretty bumpy, pretty wet, pretty windy. But this is what we love doing. So it's pretty awesome to get up on deck for another 4 hours.Night-vision shot in the cockpit looking aft. Bow-cam view at night; someone is hauling the tack of a new sail forward. Mast cam view of the foredeck crew getting buried in a wave. I see Kevin; not sure who the second person is. Cockpit crew grinding. Jack, below, talks about the cold conditions. The air is heavier, so the wind is "windier". And you're a long way from anywhere if things go wrong. Much more dangerous. Really for the driver to take as little away as possible. Doing the work on the foredeck as quickly as possible, but you want to be safe. Hurt my arm a couple of days ago. Had my arm on the forestay, and got lifted horizontal by a wave. Have to be very wary. More nighttime foredeck work. Favoriting for the epic foredeck shots.Nicho, below in semi-darkness: Right now just coming into all that breeze and grief, probably not the smartest thing you could ever do. Slomo spray. Nicolai, trimming, talks about how this is the sailing you do the race for. The cold is not that bad. The breeze is a different story. Justin, on the aft pedestal: We're in the middle of a good old-fanshioned boat race. Pretty much all the boats lined up on an easterly line. (He runs through the list of nearby competitors.) Four or five days of gybing coming up in breeze, so that's going to sort out positions pretty quickly. Somebody's gonna have one. Not our turn. Not our turn. Nicho, below: At the end of the day it's just so difficult to get across unscathed, without something happening. That's certainly our aim here. But it's a big ask, with at least a week in 30, 40 knots in the Southern Ocean. It's just a massive, massive effort.Fast sailing sunset shots; Sam getting around on the deck to show the action rather than just hiding in the cabin. Slomo washing machine. Dee, on the helm: We've had some wet wild rides, and some sunny beautiful sailing. We've seen the fleet go in front of us, which is annoying. So we're doing our best to hang in there. And it's getting colder.Closeups in the cockpit as they sail fast. Stacey's voice: "Main on." Grinding. Winch drum. Low-altitude drone shot of Vestas surfing fast. Washing machine. Mark: 50 south at this point. Air temps dropping... Nice day; going around a high pressure to the sun is out. More drone footage. Phil, below, talks about how it's going to get colder. At the moment is 12° air temperature and 10° water, we're probably going to get down to 6° on the water. Quite happy to be cold while we're leading. It's a lot worse if you're coming last in the cold. Mark, in the cockpit talking down into the cabin: "It's not his first rodeo." Tony, getting dressed: "You guys are wearing wetsuit gloves? 2 mil? I'll run my sailing gloves for the last watch before I go wetsuit. I'll go wetsuit tonight." Tony: At the moment it feels like we're just getting south, without getting to Brazil. He talks about how it's the fastest trip from Auckland he's made. Hannah, in the companionway, talks about how they can still see the other boats, and that's helpful. Jokey discussion at the stern by Nick, Tony, and Stacey (I think). Stacey: What happens at sea stays at sea. Nick: I don't think anyone's ever said that. Tony goads Nick into talking about what happened, and they talk about "a bit of a volcanic explosion" in the head. Nick: "Nothing as bad as the great eruption of Mount Mutter." Drone shot. TJ tries to thread a needle to fix some holes in something small (sock? glove?). "Good as new."Washing machine shot. Witty, below: It's difficult at the moment because everyone's in a straight line. Drag race; same sails. Just boatspeed. Sunset. It will be pretty technical after the Horn; Libby will need to pull a few rabbits out of the hat. Drone shots of them sailing fast on a sunny day. Libby: Champagne sailing, except that the temperature drops steadily. Hopefully they'll get some compression. In 3 days time in 40-45 knots. It's gonna be pretty cold, and I remember from last time when we had 50-55 knots, the waves were just going flat and the wind was firing the top of the waves into your face. We've got the helmets this time which will help. Trystan: Going to get pretty windy, 50/60 knots. Mentally preparing for that. Survival mode I think. Drone shot. Alex, eating: when it's that windy you can't push the boat that hard; just trying not to crash. When it gets shiftier after the Horn, that's when the gains and losses can be made. Drone flyby at masthead height. Alex, eating by the companionway: It's getting colder. Favorited for that last drone shot. I'm a sucker for those.Kyle works on the clew of the MH0 (leech line?) while Alberto helps him. Alberto: Strange feeling now that the next land will be Cape Horn. Talks about going south; cold, big breeze. Abby, with windswept hair, talks about making the most of the sun and warmth while they can. "After a pretty heinous 24 hours of bouncing around." Kyle, in the dusk: Saying good bye to New Zealand. Going to a very remote part of the world. Compass rose closeup. Crew below getting undressed, workin on something in a headlamp. Abby getting doused in the pit. Slomo washing machine. Crash cam from the stern of Thomas being washed off the aft pedestal. Thomas, below, talks in French.Daryl on the helm takes spray in the face as they sail fast on port gybe. Horace, sitting behind him, talks about the wind is coming. Going fast to get to the south. Fighting with everyone around them. Slomo. Kevin drinks water in slomo. Slomo washing machine. Carolijn spraying and wiping her face below. Getting undressed. Other boat alongside; presumably that's TTToP when Dongfeng passed them. Carolijn and Daryl eating below. Carolijn: Conditions right now actually very nice compared to what's to come. Noticing the water cooling down. Heading straight south at 23 knots. It's very noticeable that the air and water temperature are going down.Vestas sails fast on starboard gybe with a reefed main (I think?). Slomo washing machine shot from behind the helm. TJ, below, is eating. On screen title: Tom Johnson presents / A Christmas Story. Tom: "Hello Sam, said TJ. There once was a boy trying to make it home for Christmas." Stacey, eating below, talks about how they're 2 days away from Christmas. Stacey explains that she's not from that part of Australia, but a family is coming to see her. TJ talks about the big, cold low-pressure system that prevented them from gybing to get north. Shot on deck shows helmsman NOT standing on the helm platform, but instead on a stacked sail. Below, Sam asks Stacey, "Motivation to go faster?" Stacey: "Yeah. We've been down in the cold too long, and we're pretty keen to get out of there... Any minute now it's gonna be balmy and warm." Below, Tony eats, and explains that real Christmas for him is getting away with the family for a summer holiday. Stacey jokes that this isn't warm. Tony exhales so you can see his breath. TJ keeps telling his Christmas story, trying to get there to see his family on Christmas. Father and mother; his sister he hasn't seen for 3 years. And his niece Lucille that he's never even met. Talks about that being a hard thing about his job: Always moving. Charlie talks with Simon (off camera) about how they should do stealth mode now, becaue once MAPFRE is within 200 miles of the finish it will end. TJ talks about stealth mode. Charlie talks about how they've decided when to gybe, strategic consideration with Brunel. TJ: "TJ's storytelling voice... You'll find out how the story ends in a couple of days. Hopefully it's a happy story." Tony on the helm. TJ: "He's bringing his sled. A big sled, Vestas Wind."Condensation dripping inside from a grab rail. Firehose shot of the foredeck while Vestas is triple-heading. SiFi, unrecognizable in his balaclava except by voice, talks about how they're now drag-racing, not gybing. "We're starting to pin our ears back and sail fast." On the stern, Tony talks about the current conditions. He asks the termperature; Stacey answers "Nine and nine." Tony explains: 9 degrees C air, 9 degrees water. He talks about how even with all the layers you get cold, but if you move you get hot and then sweat, and then you get wet and cold again. Tony talks about his 3-day-old protein bar he's found in his pocket and is going to eat. Stacey says she can do better: Pulls out a bar. "Tropical holiday."Below, on port gybe, Pablo gets dressed in his bunk above the nav station. Kyle stands in the galley eating something. Pablo explains the importance of getting the boots and pants just right so they don't get wet. Because once it gets wet it's wet. A little break is enough. He then explains the same thing in Spanish.Kyle getting dressed below. He talks about how the water temperature is 6 degrees. Miserable on deck. Good motivatino to keep grinding. Carlo, below, talks about how cold it is. Kyle lists the layers of clothes he's wearing. "Rugged up as much as possible. But you still get wet, and cold." More getting dressed. "I think the worst thingis putting on a wet balaclava." He goes on deck. Carlo: "The best thing when you come inside is that you're not on deck, getting firehosed all the time. But the worst thing is you have to take off all your gear, and it takes 30 minutes." He takes off his gloves, shows his hands. He talks about how little cuts from on shore become infected. "You have to take care of your hands." We see Alberto below.Preparing to go on deck, Francesca jokes about her wearing sunglasses and not being able to see but them keeping her warm. "I doubt all be able to see any people. At the first wave. I can see something. It's nice... Sunglasses keep me warm. It's a hard life." Dee, off camera, laughs with her. Someone else (Jérémie the OBR?) calls out, "Good luck, Frankie." She waves back. "Thank you very much. Grazie mille." She blows a kiss and goes out the hatch. Dee points and laughs. Francesca pokes her head back in the hatch. Her life vest has deployed. "I'm back." We see her below getting out of the life vest. Crash cam footage from the stern as they nosedive and broach on port gybe. Below (presumably during the same or a similar incident), we see a crewmember in the gally slip and fall to starboard. Dee calls out, "Are you allright?" She explains that in these conditions doing a Chinese gybe would be catastrophic. Boom would come across, hit the runner, boat would lie on its side, probably break all the battens and if not damage the main. "And everyone would not know what to do and would rattle about like headless chickens. Be panicking. Becuase while the boat's on its side it would probably be filling with water. And we're doing a good job of that just sailing. So the potential for damage is huge, and we're pretty happy it didn't happen." Ah: Now we see crash cam/stern cam footage of them gybing accidentally from starboard to port, but then immediately recovering and gybing back again without rounding down while people in the pit scurry around. Voices: "Oh fuck." "Main on!" (pause) Liz, I think, sounding calm. "We just gybed."Sophie, below, stands close to the companionway. She is turning her head under a blast of air associated with the running engine, maybe? "I just found my hair dryer. It's so good. Ah! Who needs the hairdresser? For the first time getting dry hair. It's getting pretty cold out actually. I'd say the water is 5 degrees or colder. The Southern Ocean's awesome. We are making a lot of miles very quickly. We're going good I think. The albatross are pretty cool. There's like 10 of them following the boat. It's super cool. But it's pretty wet and a little relentless. It's what we expect I guess. It's a little crazy." Intercut with shot of the cockpit, slomo washing machine, albatrosses behind the boat. Nice portrait by Jen of my unproblematic fave.SiFi sits at the nav station looking at a routing screen on the computer. His breath is visibly fogging due to the cold. "It looks like we're walking the line between speed and safety reasonably well." Slomo of his breath fogging. With low sun behind them as they stand on the stern, Charlie and SiFi talk about a problem with the main. "There's so much friction on it on the spreaders and shit it's probably not going anywhere." Nick talks about a couple of squall lines came through, up to 45 knots. And going onto the third reef the headboard of the mainsail isn't going onto lock. Mark: "Well, we've got 44 knots, and if you look this way there's a massive cloud, and the water's more white than blue." Charlie jokes about not saying "white squall". Slomo. Sam to Mark: "How is it being down here?" Mark: "It's everything you'd expect. Windy, cold, we've got 48 knots right now. Look upwind. It's crazy. Doing 30 knots of boatspeed. It's pretty crazy, but somehow everything's still in control." Slomo wake.In the cockpit (trimming the main, I suspect) Alberto talks about the next 24 hours as they head toward the depression. "At least for the moment it's still warm." Chuckles. Peter, sitting on the low side of the pit, talks about how conditions are going to change completely in the next day. Slightly lifting at the moment, later will gybe over, then on port will see "first bit of real Southern Ocean action for the leg. Yeah; it's gonna be pretty windy." Has his warm clothing downstairs. So far pretty nice this trip. Looking after the boat. Shot of someone working the bow in spray. Alberto grinding. Shifting the stack aft. Carlo working the clew of the headsail on a halyard. Abby repairing the pit winch. A rainbow ahead of them.Drone shot of AkzoNobel with sunrise ahead of them. Distant shot of TTToP to leeward as AkzoNobel sails on port tack. Peter, on a pedestal: "After almost 7,000 miles it's pretty impressive to see the competitors nearby." Luke: "The racing in the Volvo 65's is close because they're all one-design." Talks about TTToP, and Scallywag being in stealth mode. Peter: "Looks like every 10 years I'm back in this race." Luke: "It's gotten a lot colder now that we're going upwind." Talks about wearing surgical gloves under the other gloves to increase the warmth. Peter, smiling: "I didn't bring gloves."Kyle gets dressed below in the full-on gasketed foulies. Talks about the competition. Peter, below, talks about opportunities when it goes light again. Bouwe, below, talks about their choosing a more northern line. Peter and Kyle talk about how bad the conditions are on deck. Slomo washing machine footage of cockpit, shifting the stack. Annie: "Don't go to the death zone. Also known as the bow." Stack. Coiling line. Slomo winch. Abby rubs water from her face. Bouwe on the helm. Slomo washing machine in the cockpit, grinding.Slomo shot of a dark albatross gliding in their wake. Emily, below, getting out of her bunk: "It's cold." Jules, at the nav station, talks about how they're still riding the front, but have high pressure a few days ahead. Simeon repairs some piece of gear, hands it to someone, and talks about the upcoming winds and strategy. "In general we've been sailing the boat well." Nicho, on the stern: "Number one challenge is how we're gonna get ahead of some of the boats ahead of us." Talks about how boats can get stuck in the approach to Cape Town. Slomo of spray coming into the cockpit.Below, Horace talks about being south, and it getting colder and windier. Horace: "I prefer cold more than hot." Jérémie, below, eats and talks in French. Horace: "If we sail fast, maybe four and a half days. And if we sail slow will be 5 days or 8 days more." Slomo washing machine shot of the cockpit from the cabin, and then from the cockpit looking forward. Horace on the aft pedestal. Slomo shots of spray from the mast. Marie on the helm, looking forward.Below, Stacey puts on multiple layers of cold-weather foulies. She talks about how it's a long process getting dressed. Stacey: "Like Charlie said it's Monday; we've got one week of work and then we're on vacation." Shots of the crew in the cockpit as Vestas sails fast on port gybe. Wake. Washing machine. Tony on the helm. Tony goes below, takes off his cowl. "Wow. Another wet one." Tony talks about their performance being good, good scheds, 24-hour longest run possibility. Says there's a sched coming in now. Tony takes off his foulies and layers. Jena talks about how it's cold, but fast, and that a sched is coming in. "Hopefully still fast." Charlie, in his bunk, looks at SiFi at the nav station. SiFi: "Yeah; we're longest run again." Later he talks to Martin: "We're going well in this windy stuff which is nice. It's a race to the east, to stay in front of the front." Talks about it being tricky, needing to try to avoid the high pressure above and behind. "A couple of days of fast sailing, then it's going to get tricky."Shot of foulies hanging below. On deck, Sophie is bundled up. She talks about how it's become colder and all the clothes she's wearing. Not going to go much further south, though. Pretty cold at night, but not as bad in the day. Windier, so wet, so that adds to the cold. Támara, in a cowl, puts sunscreen (?) on her lips and cheeks. Slomo closeup of Rob scowling in his ear-flaps hat. Below, in the galley, Ñeti makes coffee. He talks in Spanish. On deck, trimming the mainsheet, he drinks it. From the cabin, he hoists his coffee mug to the camera.Nicho, on deck as AkzoNobel sails on starboard gybe in 10 knots of wind: "The last sched dropped us from first to fifth... The game is to set ourselves up for the next front." Simeon talks about the next 24-48 hours, and how they've stacked the sails smaller so they can get them further astern. Emily: "I'm expecting it to get a lot windier and a lot colder. So I've got two sets of thermals I've been saving up for the whole trip." Brad, below, says he's been saving thermals. Nicolai, below, also says he's been saving up a new set of thermals he'll be pulling out. Shot up the slot at AkzoNobel triple-heading on starboard.