Blair, below: So, real interesting one. Final appraoch to the Hague and the end of the race, and we knew it would be the case, but there's these TSS's that are a massive exclusion zone. Have to make a choice off Denmark which way to go. We were lining up to go on the inside, down toward Germany and along the beaches on the top of Holland; made a late call to go to the west. As a result we lost quite a lot on Brunel and AkzoNobel who had decided to go this way earlier, and doing so we split from Dongfeng who were carrying on down. It's a tricky one, but at the end of the day we have to do what we think is right to get us there fastest, and both the boats we had to beat are going different ways, and we feel this way's fastest. Got Brunel about a mile above us now, so we're gonna have to fight to the end. But that's the way it is. All good really. Wouldn't want it any other way. Not long to the finish now, definitely in the final sprint. Probably no sleep now for sure. Not that there's been much sleep. There's gonna be compression toward the finish as well. Lot of light stuff and gybing... Plenty to play for. Just glad we're here and in the fight. It's been a busy few days, just looking forward to finishing off well. Black and white shot of the cockpit. Mast cam view of lowering the J1. Loud shot of the cockpit. Conversation between Blair and Joan at the nav station. Xabi in the pit. Slomo. Blair on the helm.Carlo, below: It's very light. So it's an opportunity to catch up on the two red boats. And on sleep. He gets in his bunk. Peter, on deck: Pretty light. Working our way back up to Norway. Stretching the course, which is good for us... Can see the boats ahead of us, bit of a compression. Kyle, on the helm: Of course the dream is still alive till it's over. Some good gains... Keep plugging away and hopefully catch them in the next 24 hours. AkzoNobel behind them. Dongfeng and MAPFRE heading south. Peter and Capey talk about current and the virtual mark. Peter: Wanna wake everyone up? Two miles? Capey: I think that will do it for me. (Calling layline.) They tack. They come into the virtual mark, with Capey calling the bear away. Abby on the bow talks about them having rounded the mark, and traffic separation scheme coming up. Sam: How is the mood on board right now? Abby: It's good. Still in good spirits. Still a long way to go, gotta keep plugging. As much as we would like to be down there, we just gotta keep trucking. Shot of the two boats ahead of them.Blair preps a sail patch below. "Too many sail changes, and the [something] which attaches the sheet to the sail, went through the J1's... So a quick repair before the next sail change. Endless... He and Neti apply the patch on the sail near the bow. Willy, on the foredeck, talks in Spanish. Repeats in English: If there's another team besides us in this race that deserves to win it's them. We've been stuck behind them for the last 2 days. We had our chances to pass them. We did pass them, but they always come back strong. They're just under half a mile. We're just catching them up now in the next half hour. Compression and transition. Plenty of chances. Blair below tells Tamara, "Two hours". Then says "Nahh..." Maybe he was joking? Rounding the virtual mark, with Dongfeng heading south and dthen them following them. Chasing Dongfeng south with Vestas (I think) approaching them.Ben and Trystan go through food packs by the galley. Libby tells them 10 minutes to the virtual mark. Witty asks how far. Libby: 4.7 miles. Fleet compressed; at one point everyone was within 6 or 7 miles; now they've spread out again. Might be able to get past Turn the Tide. Will see in 40 minutes. Boats around the "mark" are going slower than boats still going upwind, so wind is light. Witty calls to be ready for a tack. "Hopefully get across Plastics." They tack. Owner on the grinder. Drone shots of them converging with TTToP, both sailing very slowly.Knotmeter on mast reads 5.7. Stacking amidships. Francesca: Of course it's a mix of emotions. You want to push, because it's the last leg, and you want to gain a position on the leaderboard. But in a week and a half it's over, and you need to work out your work plans, dream plans... it's a bit weird for everyone. I think we did some good legs during the race. Maybe we deserve something more than to finish last in the race. This leg seems quite open. MAPFRE and Dongfeng had a big lead yesterday, and they lost everything in this light patch. Every thing is open to the finish line. Everyone is quite tired. But the other boats are in the same position as us. Cannot complain, and just do what we know to do in the few hours we still have of this Volvo Ocean Race. Bernardo: I think we didn't sleep one straight hour... Lucas: My eyes are bleeding. Slomo of Bernardo, Bianca, Bernardo and Lucas eating below. Grinding.Drifting in light conditions. SiFi talks about wind. Stacey: The standard Volvo Ocean Race compression has happeend. We busted our butts to get somewhere and then (hits her hands together) we all end up together. Mark and SiFi looking around. MAPFRE and Dongfeng 3 miles away. TJ talks about a spectator boat motoring out to see them. Nick puts on an abdominal wrap. "I got this from an even older, and more damaged bowman; Neti, right there (pointing). He puts on his foulie pants over it. "Kind of feels like a diaper though." Charlie calls from the bow: Dongfeng looks like they're getting the better of... Nick: High pressure clouds... It's gonna be a good day. Stacy grinds. Tony on the helm points out MAPFRE sailing with strong wind. TJ: They're heeled over. So we compress and now we're expanding. Bungee. SiFi and Charlie talking at the nav station. They all sound loopy as hell.Kevin carries a stacking pole. Jack on the helm with MAPFRE in the background. Charles, Marie, scowling. Light air tack. Stu. Horace. They all look exhausted. Tacking the MH0. Pascal. Carolijn: Aarhus, a bit crazy in the marina but very fun. Waypoint not as far north as the last one. Been through a light patch; hopefully that will be the last of it. MAPFRE to leeward, had a bit of a battle in the transition. And allowed other boats to catch up. Can see Vestas. Battling it out with MAPFRE at the moment.Neti talks in Spanish in the morning light about wind, the fleet, Dongfeng. Repeats in English: Busy night. Pretty tied with Dongfeng. Not too far from the top mark. Last evening had upwind and reaching condiions in medium breeze. Now compression, Dongfeng and us have escaped from the other guys before, now we have to keep in front of them. Loud footage of foredeck work, darkness. Then drifting conditions in the pretty gorgeous sunrise with Dongfeng a quarter mile away. Slomo sailing with Dongfeng behind them. Willy sleeping on the stack forward. Blair, through the hatch, puts his hands up: What?Amazing sunrise drone shot with AkzoNobel sailing across in front of it. Luke on the helm: I'd say everyone is shattered. It'd be a good word. This has probably been the longest stretch of sleep for people. Unfortunately Brad and I are on watch while everyone else is getting this great sleep. I think in total we've probably had an hour since the start, of solid sleep. But that's the race; it's a short leg. It's part of what we do. Lots of corners, lots of places to see, different countries. Stacking. Drone shot of pulling J1 forward for a sail change. Brad, hanking on the J1, talks about not having sleep. Getting up able to see all the boats. Almost a restart. Feeling hopeful as well. Simeon: Back in the same spot we were 24 hours ago. All compressing in. Leaders are just 5 miles in front, hitting a wall of no pressure. Drone shot with sunrise. Luke: We keep on pushing because if we're going to take the effort to be out here, might as well push and try to win the leg. Doesn't mean too much for overall points for us, but if we're all going to be together and do our last race, we'll do the best we can. Sunrise.Blair, by the runner, talks about the competitive situation. They've stretched out on the boats behind on this downwind stretch, but have managed to stay close to Dongfeng. As we've come in toward Denmark now we've compressed a bit. 1.5 miles behind them. J0 ("joe") reaching at the moment. All's good, but hopefully we can catch these guys some more before the Hague, and catch them. Everyone's running on 20 minutes sleep; I should go below and get some sleep. (Asked about Brunel.) Good that they're 20 miles behind, but they need to keep focused on the guys in front. Beautiful drone shot of them surfing with the sun behind them. Drone shots of them triple-heading. Blair on the helm. Slomo of someone taking spray on the foredeck. Wind farm. Spreader cam shot of Dongfeng ahead of them.Drone shot alongside as AkzoNobel sails in 15 knots of wind. Looks like they have a J0 and J3 up; MH0 and J2 (maybe?) are up but furled. Maybe shifting gears in expectation of falling wind? Brad goes out to the MH0 clew to take the lazy sheet off. Nicho talks about them expecting lighter winds as they approach the Irish coast. Beautiful drone shot with grassy hillside in the foreground and AkzoNobel and two other competitors (TTToP and Vestas, I think, from the tracker) behind them approaching the coast. Jules talks strategy in the cockpit. Jules: It's pretty rugged, and the water's pretty fresh and clean, and there's lots of granite that's been weathered by lots of storms, so there's lots of caves and arches. Drone shot flying through a sea cave (!) with AkzoNobel visible beyond. Then another shot of a small opening in the rock with a red-sailed boat (MAPFRE?) beyond. Jules: Pretty green because it rains a lot. And there's lots of good pubs. That's why I like it. He talks about the fleet, and compression; first 6 boats all within 3-5 miles of each other. Emily: Quite cool to see the geography of Ireland. Usually the wather's bad so you don't see it that much. Justin on the bow with Fastnet rock behind him. Drone shot with ridge and AkzoNobel beyone. Nicho: third or fourth at the moment; same as we are overall. Way forward for us to score as high up as possible, but certainly conditions ahead could have boats doing damage. We need a little of that to help us get on the podium overall. Just keep pushing the boat and sailing as quick as we can.SiFi at the nav station. Reads out the latest sched. Gains on the boats ahead. Had a good transition into the northerly. Got ahead of the schedule on the routing. The guys in front are still a decent chunk ahead. But have made some gains, which is encouraging. So we're optimistic for what lies ahead. Things will get lighter and more complicated, more tidal, in the Bristol Channel.Rob: Talks about transitions in the leg. Compressions. First boat in slows down and the others catch up. It varies. Sophie sits silent behind him. Rob expects they'll see more compressions, tidal compressions, in the Bristol Channel. Blair: about 24 hours out of Cardiff now. We're in pretty big trouble. We're in fifth place at the moment. Vestas is 30 or 40 miles ahead of us, and the others further than that. Looks like there won't be a complete compression. We'll keep going, but not on that good a shift at the moment. Sailed a few too many miles. We'll keep going; never give up. But not great at the moment. Pablo says something in Spanish; Blair steers behind him. Tamara looks serious. Sophie on the bowsprit hooks up a new sail. Looks like they're peeling J0 -> MH0.We look into the hot chocolate with protein powder cup. Peter: "It's kind of summing up the last day." Started out with so much promise when you get handed a coffee mug. And now I"m just left wiht a very confused cup. Is it a protein drink? Is it hot chocolate? Do you want it?" Richard: No. Peter: Here's to Neptune. (He tosses it over the side.) Changing sails on the foredeck. Trystan: Yesterday was a pretty dark camp aboard Scallywag. High pressure ridge; last to enter it. Hoping for a bit more compression. Got 10 knots of breeze, and moving nicely. Having just come on watch it's a happier place than it was 6 hours ago, that's for sure. Stacking below. Stacking on deck.Sign taped to the aft side of the doghouse: "National Wine Day". Has wind forecast for each various times throughout the day. DTF 670. Libby: It is. It's National Wine Day. Libby at the nav station with Witty. Witty reads out the gains on the other boats due to the comression. Peter on the helm. Drone shots in light conditions. Foredeck. Slomo telltales. Antonio: 600 miles from the finish. Having to cross the light conditions. Libby and Witty at the nav station. Libby yawns. Flopping with the MH0. Slomo flopping. Antonio talks about the ETA. Flopping. Antonio: Still a bit far behind to talk about catching someone. If it were windy it would be harder, so it's good to have these conditions now. Peter shakes the main to try to pop the batten. Sunset.Sophie, on the bow in light conditions, talks about the compression that's happening. Knew it was coming, but it's super good to see the other boats. She points out Vestas and Dongfeng in front of them. Xabi, on the bow, talks in Spanish. He talks about Dongfeng ahead of them, and points out Vestas on the port beam. He repeats in English. 600 miles to go to Cardiff. He talks more in Spanish, repeats in English. After this leg hasn't gone well for them, this light spot is important to try to make a change. Hopefully they will be close and have more options south of Ireland. Making numbers all the time and they don't look very good for us right now. Dongfeng ahead, and have a boat between us. Going to be a big fight all the way to The Hague. Neti trims and talks in Spanish. Slomo shots of crew in the cockpit. Rob throws a coiled line. Sophie on the bow. Blair looks through binoculars for another boat. Xabi trimming. Vestas on the horizon. Dongfeng on the horizon. Crew on the bow.Jules at the nav station: Going to come to a grinding halt... Will get a bit of breeze Sunday from the north to get us to the southwest tip of Ireland. And then a very messy situation in the Celtic Sea. Going to take us 2 days to get into Wales, and no obvious way to get in. Might see a restart in the race. But we'll see what hapens. Drone shots of AkzoNobel sailing in lighter conditions under the MH0. Brad: As expected we're sailing in lighter conditions... All these boats are moving in behind us and getting closer. Closer in distance, but should be about the same time-wise. Can see Brunel again; about 6 miles. Keep pushing, through this ridge and out the other side. Drone shot circling AkzoNobel in the sunrise.Washing machine on deck. Sailing fast. Slomo. Spray. Jack, below, is eating. You have to spend about half your watch thinking about nice stuff. When you think of this stuff you think it's what you want to do, but when you're in it it gets tedious pretty quickly. Moving around the boat you're crawling; in your bunk is the best place, but even there is hard. And on deck you're getting thrown around. Driving is two hours of having your eyeballs assailed by salt water. Hard work. Slomo spray. Charles, below: Ahead a big light spot, and I hope compression. For the leader there is a wall of no wind. I don't think anyone will be able to cross it, because it is moving with us. A big compression, a big mess, and then the winner of this leg will be the most lucky boat. Slomo spray.Xabi, in the cockpit talks in Spanish. Wind is about 12 knots. Talks about Turn the Tide and AkzoNobel, the approach to Newport. Repeats in Spanish: The last 24 hours we knew would be very tricky. Last night had winds up to 35 knots downwind. Now we've passed the front and we're going upwind with 7 or 8 knots. Going to be a compression. Managed to pass Turn the Tide, and made some distance as well with AkzoNobel. Are now 8 miles from Vestas. Still some hope. A lot can happen. Crew stacks to leeward in anticipation of a tack. Working the jury-rigged keel turing the tack. Joan, Xabi, and Neti clustered over the nav station, talking in Spanish. Washing machine from the cabin looking aft. Rob on the helm; Xabi on the pedestal. As it gets dark, wind is lighter, Rob looks to starboard through binoculars. Willy forward for a sail change. Looks like going from MH0 to J0 or vice versa.Grinding. Slomo washing spray with Witty on the helm. Libby below: 3 or 4 days to the finish. But a lot's going to happen. Heading toward the high pressure. Going to have to gybe. Leaders will go into lighter breeze, so we'll gain. As much of a realist I am, I think it's going to be hard to overtake anyone, but we'll get back in touch with the fleet. You can never say never. Antonio bailing. Spray on deck. Bagging garbage. Washing machine shot of the hatch from inside.Slomo washing machine. Crew grimacing. Kevin: We are the boat that is the most west of the fleet. We chose to keep this gauge in order to have more wind in the next 48 hours. It's not an easy position. Since you're going first into the high pressure you have less wind than the boats behind. We'll see in the next 48 hours if this was a good choice or not. Slomo spray, serious crew faces. Marie's water bottle.Evening drone shots of them drifting in light winds with rain on the horizon. Parko, on the helm: This part of the world is known for a relatively easy crossing. The land breeze helps. Clouds. Peter brushes his teeth. Ben mixes up something in the galley. Bird on ddeck (black tern?) Ben looks at clouds. Trystan says Libby has a good point that looking at the scheds for the next few days will be pretty depressing. But there will be a compression coming into Newport, and that will make or break the leg.At the nav station, Joan talks in Spanish about the doldrums, wind, the comeptition. Rob, on the wheel: Dongfeng 3 miles behind us. Leaders 100 miles away off their bow. Brunel and TTToP off their port bow. But weather is changing dramatically. Light air between them and New Zealand. Uncertain. We're optimistic. Hoping the fleet's going to compress. Anything could happen. Fleet is spread quite widely, with 150 miles separation, so it could go either way. About 1200 miles to Auckland; 5 or 6 days. Quiet shots of them concentrating in the cockpit, trimming. Drone shot of MAPFRE with an atoll a few miles to starboard of their track. Drone shots.Bouwe calls for help on the computer from Capey. "I'm too stupid with computers; that's probably it." Capey eats. Bouwe: "Smells good." Capey troubleshoots. Bouwe: "We need the master." Bouwe: A very good sched. Gained 60 miles on the leaders. But I think the guys in the back will catch up as well. So it will be a restart. So positioning in the next 48 hours is key. A lot of things can happen along the New Zealand coast. It never ends until the finish. I think the feeling is the boat is going the best it ever has gone. I'm still attached to my leg. Guys were talking about amputating it... Hasn't heeled in 5 days. I've been going back and forth with the medical director. Maybe just wait until Auckland and see if we can heel it over there. On deck, cool shot as the camera follows crew as they go forward and around the foredeck. Carlo brushing his teeth as he works.Pablo, below, talks about the tricky conditions. Being in front of the front, losing the wind, and compression happening. Needing to decide where to be to catch the next wind. They're a little to the northeast, and they think it's good for them. It's middle of the night, Brunel, Dongfeng, and TTToP all very close to each other fighting to get the next pressure. Shot of them sailign fast on port, triple-heading. Dongfeng to leeward. Pulling down the J0 on the foredeck. Shifting the stack. Slomo of Dongfeng to leeward, of Xabi on the helm. Washing machine. Then light winds. Sophie on the foredeck as they slat in no wind. Stacking forward, with headsail rolled up as a windseeker. Chart screen. Drone shot of them triple-heading with Dongfeng behind them. Cool drone shots.