Libby talks about the big unknown: When to gybe. Turn the Tide looks like they're in bad shape, but they could actually do better. Dongfeng and MAPFRE; we chose a longer route, but better pressure all the way. But generally you don't know. Sunset, clouds, washing machine on deck. Slomo water running along the deck. We see the gybe at night from the stern camera. "Big grind guys."Slomo of AkzoNobel sailing upwind, close-hauled on port tack. Nicolai, below, talks about the remaining leg for them. Nicho, at the helm: "Learned the same lessons I think I've been taught before: never to be complacent. I don't think we were complacent, but we had one terrible gybe which I'm more responsible for than anyone, and that cost us the leg. And the usual story, that you make that mistake in the middle of nowhere, and you can pay for it for a long time. So that's what we did this leg." Martine, on deck: "What I've learned on this spedific leg? Probably a lot of patience. And try to find joy, and happiness, in little things every day... Sometimes a bird, or whale-watching, has made my day, a funny joke; anything. Always try to find the thing that makes you happy." Brad sleeping on the foredeck in bare feet. Nicolai, below: "I think this leg's been quite a challenge for many of us. Not so much a normal Volvo leg, physically a challenge, but more mentally and team-wise, it's been a tough one. But it's also been one that we probably needed to have to keep getting better and better, and hopefully learn from it, all of us, and become a stronger team. And I think we are handling quite well the headwinds we have, no issues within the team, it's all head down and keep working whatever we find ourself in and that's quite positive and quite good." Slomo of someone's hands on the wheel.Charlie, below, talks about how they've cleared the ice gate. "We're in an ocean race. Now we have the whole ocean to sail around in." Mark, in the pit, talks about no more gybing. "Well, no more gybing every hour." He trims something in in the pit. The crew shifts the stack from forward aft using the traditional heave chant: "Two, Six!"Willy, on the stern trimming the mainsheet, talks in Spanish saying something about two days, Dongfeng, ice gate, fighting, sleeping, cold. (3 years of high school Spanish, folks.) Xabi, his arm around the runner, talks to Jen while Willy steers. He talks about having a long board now since the gybe this morning, so people can sleep/recover. They've had a whole off-watch. He offers Jen water. Jen: "No thanks." Xabi talks in Spanish. Xabi talks to someone off-camera (Rob?) in English. Xabi: "Last time the Southern Ocean leg was very hard as well, you remember? Lots of gybing..." Then the storm after the... spreader broken [?]. Xabi: "I think the last 48 hours have been very intense. For us, [points toward Dongfeng ahead and to windward] for both of us for sure. We've done, I haven't counted, more than 20 gybes, and it's been very hard. But it's good fun as well, we've had good battle with Dongfeng. We passed them, they passed us again, and now they are 3 miles [?] away... It's one week to go, hopefully after today and tomorrow we will gybe, and have little bit quiet for the last week, but it's going to be windy again, and it's going to be a full-on fight with Dongfeng." Willy, on the mainsheet, jokes about sending a message to his friend. "Please! [something] come and save me!"Annie, with no foulies on below, puts her foot down and holds on, wincing, as she slowly adjusts her position to get out of her bunk. She says something to Abby, next to her. Lying down, she describes getting pushed into the guy wire against the back of the boat. Big pain in her right side, couldn't move her right leg. Couldn't stand up, couldn't crawl. Ice gate was coming up; guys had to drag her along the deck and put her in the bunk. Shot of them taking her foulies off as she describes the pain. "It's like a burning pain." Bouwe: "Suggest the only thing is get the gear off now, and get her in the sleeping bag." Later, as she's lying down, she describes the pain to them: "It's like a 6 most of the time. And then sometimes it's a shooting pain that's more like an 8." Bouwe: "Most important thing is get her down, even if the ice gate is coming up... Security first. Before any medication I just made a quick call... Because if there's any internal bleeding then of course you can do wrong things." Every 4 hours she's getting [something; presumably painkillers]. "But she's a tough cookie." Shot of Bouwe on the phone at the nav station, writing notes, crew pawing through bag for medicine. Bouwe talking to Annie in her bunk. I think they're talking about where the pain is. Bouwe: "It's basically on the [bum?], yeah? That's good, because I was worried at the time [something]." Annie: "It's my lower back." Bouwe pats her on the shoulder. Annie, in her bunk: "Since then for the last 24 hours I've been in my bunk. Bouwe called Spike [?] yesterday, I've been on painkillers, I've just emailed him a few hours ago to see if he knows what it might be and if there's any way to fast-track getting me back on deck. At the moment we're going along the ice gate and we're gybing a lot and I feel very bad that I can't help everyone with the stacking and gybing. It's hard to stack myself. The goal is to get back on deck as soon as I can. We're not even halfway through the leg yet, so, yeah. I really need to recover quickly." Carlo, below with Sudocrem (?) on his lower face, goes through a bag labeled "First Aid". Louis: "It's one pair of hands less on deck, so it's obviously much harder, there's much more work to do. So if you're with four persons on deck there's always one who can rest. So now it's 4 hours full on, grinding, trimming, driving. So then you suddenly realize how much Annie does. I really miss her in my watch for sure."MAPFRE is sailing downwind on port gybe. Pablo is steering, Louis is grinding, Blair is trimming. Blair squints into the sun. "Where are they?" Shot of Dongfeng crossing on starboard a few hundred yards astern of them. [Note: This might be a different time than the squinting; it's no overcast.] Blair talks to Jen about how this morning earlier they'd gone below after a gybe and heard them easing the sheets, poked his head up and say MAPFRE cross about 5 meters behind Dongfeng. Talks about giving a "cheeky wave." "Since then there's been 3 or 4 crosses, and they're about a mile ahead now." Slomo washing machine.Below, Pablo talks in Spanish. (Same as the previous video, where he talked in English about keeping their clothes on when off watch because they were going up to gybe every hour.)Slomo shot of waves through the wheel. Interesting slowed-down audio. An albatross flies by. Slomo grinding. Slomo faces; Carolijn on the helm. Slomo trimming. Below, Carolijn takes off her gear. She talks to Martin; behind Fabien is making food in the galley. Carolijn: "Yes, it's painful. Not necessarily painful, it's just tough. It's very tiring. You get to a certain stage where you're so tired that you start tripping over your own feet. If you don't watch out it can be quite dangerous." Talks about even 20 minutes lying down in your bunk, even if you don't sleep, helps you get the energy to make the next gybe. "I've lost count. I don't even know if we're halfway yet. Just in the last 3 hours of my off watch we've done 6 gybes?... Entertaining stuff." Fabien eats with a bit of a 1,000-yard stare. (Looking at the tracker through this section it's been brutal; Dongfeng and MAPFRE are at the front of the fleet within AIS range of each other having a running gybing battle to see who can stay closer to the exclusion zone.) Pascal, below, drops his head and rubs it. Looks tired. We pull back and see he's watching Charles at the nav station from his bunk. Charles talks to Martin: "It's very simple. During 30 hours we're having to gybe every hour so it's a nightmare. Not very funny but we have no choice. We have the ice limit for a good reason... You have to stack every time, 600 kilos each time... You don't manage to sleep... That's life at the extreme for sure. On the positive side, we are ahead with MAPFRE and fighting for the first place, so it's good."