Below, Kevin talks about being tired. "With my watch partner Carolijn Brouwer we have been 12 hours on deck - 14, 2 more. Lots of gybes along the ice limit. Now we are getting more pressure, sea state." Now 2 hours of rest before being back on deck, then one very important gybe before heading north for Australia. Carolijn: "I think I have to admit I'm pretty tired now. All the action on deck seems to happen when Kevin and I are off watch. But it's part of the job and you ahve to get it done. It's part of the race." In the Southern Ocean it's harder because of getting dressed and undressed. "When you do that every 2 hours it gets a bit frustrating. In other legs it's much less a problem... There's a lot more layers coming on than otherwise.... Have to push really hard. The guys on MAPFRE have done really well." Fabien talks in French. Black talks about normal life on board. Having to be ready. Eating a lot of food with no rice (?). Pascal talks in French.Dee, at the nav station, explains about how the ice limit has been moved since they started racing, and the effect of that is that they have different wind conditions to sail in. "To the north of us is a big high pressure, to the south is a barrier we can't quite cross, and it leaves us this very narrow corridor of breeze to sail in." She explains this is her sixth time in the Southern Ocean, and she doesn't remember sailing this far north in this area. Doesn't think she's sailed north of the Kerguelen Islands before. Talks about climate change as a possible factor in pushing the ice further north. Harder work to sail this way, but better safety. Screenshot of the ice limit and Kerguelen Islands. Stacking. Francesca does the Twist to pull a stacking pole from the deck. Franchesca on the helm. Crew plays roshambo. Slomo washing machine over Bianca (I think) on the aft grinder pedestal.Dongfeng, on starboard, crosses behind MAPFRE on port. Possibly the same cross seen in the previous MAPFRE video? Shot of spray on the bow, in sun, as Dongfeng triple-heads on port gybe. Drone shot of Dongfeng sailing on port gybe witih MAPFRE crossing on starboard about a mile behind them. Kevin steering. Someone grinding. Drone shots of Dongfeng sailing fast. Kevin talks about gybing with MAPFRE along the ice limit. "We had the last good move... It's nice to see that after one week of race we are still seeing each other."Slomo shot of waves through the wheel. Interesting slowed-down audio. An albatross flies by. Slomo grinding. Slomo faces; Carolijn on the helm. Slomo trimming. Below, Carolijn takes off her gear. She talks to Martin; behind Fabien is making food in the galley. Carolijn: "Yes, it's painful. Not necessarily painful, it's just tough. It's very tiring. You get to a certain stage where you're so tired that you start tripping over your own feet. If you don't watch out it can be quite dangerous." Talks about even 20 minutes lying down in your bunk, even if you don't sleep, helps you get the energy to make the next gybe. "I've lost count. I don't even know if we're halfway yet. Just in the last 3 hours of my off watch we've done 6 gybes?... Entertaining stuff." Fabien eats with a bit of a 1,000-yard stare. (Looking at the tracker through this section it's been brutal; Dongfeng and MAPFRE are at the front of the fleet within AIS range of each other having a running gybing battle to see who can stay closer to the exclusion zone.) Pascal, below, drops his head and rubs it. Looks tired. We pull back and see he's watching Charles at the nav station from his bunk. Charles talks to Martin: "It's very simple. During 30 hours we're having to gybe every hour so it's a nightmare. Not very funny but we have no choice. We have the ice limit for a good reason... You have to stack every time, 600 kilos each time... You don't manage to sleep... That's life at the extreme for sure. On the positive side, we are ahead with MAPFRE and fighting for the first place, so it's good."Spreader cam view of foredeck with Scallywag sailing way off the wind. Witty at nav station, talks about having "grannied" (tacked around, presumably) twice instead of gybing, because of having heard that AkzoNobel broke their mast track while gybing. Wants to keep the boat together here and finish fast. Jokes about the ice limit as a fence the Volvo people built in the ocean. Talks about having a week along the ice gate. Spreader cam shot of the boat surfing. Witty: "I told Parko to sail at 95%, not 100. He's doing 29 knots, so he must have taken a knot off. He si a full-blown lunatic." Crash-cam view of Parko being blown off the wheel by a wave while surfing; jumping back on the wheel. Parko below: "Yeah, I drove for a little bit with no hands there. Didn't Chinese and we didn't tack, so it's okay." Bow cam of spray. Alex, below, talks about steering. "Yeah, it's pretty difficult. I probably only do a half an hour at a time... It's tricky now, because the waves are so big that you don't want to go down some of them. But sometimes you kind of have to go down them... It's a bit of an art to go fast, but not go down the wrong waves and break the boat." Parko talks about it taking energy, having just done a gybe, it saps up all the energy from your little naps, it's gone after you have one maneuver. Time to eat some food and recharge, and be ready for the next one when it comes.