Horace, bailing, talks about how awesome it is to sail fast. That's why he came to this race. I hate the life on board, but I love fast. Kevin looks through the endoscope and sees something below. He gets the swim gear on and dives in from the bow. Big piece of seagrass on the keel that he gets off. That loooked cold! Drone shot circling the boat in light conditions. Horace interviews Pascal on the bow: We're going to arrive the day we arrive. Marie: Maybe three more days, eh? Stu: Both are stressful. I find the heavy weather more stressful, especially when you're driving at night. Pascal on how difficult light conditions are. Stu: I'm going to right about how hard it is to have a shit on the toilet when the boat is sailing 30 knots. Carolijn below, brushing her hair, comments how the person on the boat who doesn't have any hair made a comment about her appearance. On deck, she gives some of the hair she pulled out on Kevin's head. Daryl, on the helm, talks about sailing into the high pressure ridge. Big line of clear blue sky ahead, where there will be zero wind. Pascal and Charles talking on the bow in French. Glassy conditions. Kevin to Pascal: We don't see them on AIS? Pascal shakes his head. Bird flies over. High drone shot. Other boat (I think Vestas from the tracker) on the horizon behind them as Stu steers in light wind. They tack the MH0 onto port. Low drone shot approaching from far away.Sunrise. Liz hands over the wheel to Frederico. At 13 knots she had just under 10 on the keel; at 15 she brings it up again. She debriefs with him about height-vs-speed tradeoff. Dee at the nav station. "Just got the position report. Probably only about 36-40 hours of sailing left." Closed with Vestas, but everyone else is sailing faster than them. MAPFRE have just moved into view on the horizon, only 6 miles away. "Bloody red boat again... Race for third is full on, between ourselves, Vestas, and MAPFRE." She says she's gutted, but she has to be positive when she goes on deck. Martin steering, Dee comes up. MAPFRE is 8 miles away. Points out Brunel and Vestas ahead. Henry talks with her about the strategic situation. Annalise: Been able to see them both for an hour now. Had our suspicions that it was MAPFRE... A full-on last day into the finish. Hopefully we can finish strongly and be happy when we get into Newport. Drone show from low alongside the bow. Dee: The fight for third place... could be the difference is a rain cloud. Big depression with 35 knots of wind coming through... Boats could change places at the finish line with a puff of breeze. I'm kind of nervous and excited at the same time. Drone shot of them unfurling the J3 to triple-head.Sargasso weed. Someone checks the keel with the endoscope. Keel, rudder shots. Sailing fast through weed. Slomo. Closeup of weed. Alex, below, explains about weed on the foils. Nipper and Trystan can look to see what's on the foils. Tricky when it's dark. The boat hook is handy as well. You can half wipe out, and it will get the weed off. At the moment it's all over the bow. It smells a bit downstairs. Not sure if it's Nipper or the weed. Nipper asks a riddle: Why do starfish cry? Because of the seaweed. (blank emoji)Neti and Xabi working on the keel hydraulics. Joan talks to them in Spanish. Joan to the cockpit: "You don't have instruments, right?" He gives a thumbs up. Neti, below, talks in Spanish, apparently about the breakage and repair. They have a jury-rigged piece of string marking the keel position. He demonstrates releasing pressure, and then adding pressure. Closeup of the markings on the box under the string.Closeups of B&G instruments with nothing displayed. Neti, below, explains that they have "No batteries, no systems, nothing." Neti and Joan working in the bottom part of the cabin. Pablo, on the helm, talks about the issue in Spanish. Shot of the compass binnacle. Xabi stands talking on the satellite phone, explaining the situation. Computer screen showing electronic schematics. Neti working on an instrument panel while engine runs. Joan and Neti talking in Spanish. Joan stands on the stern on the sat phone, holding it high for better antennae operation. Closeups of various components. Xabi talks about fuses blowing, the electronics breaking, the PLC (?) broken means they can't control the keel. Working on a workaround. Pablo talks in Spanish in the cockpit. Instruments behind him apear to have readings, though. Pablo, Neti, and Xabi below work on the keel box. Xabi, to the cockpit: 'It's moving. So what do you need now?" They laugh at the response. Neti: "It's 33 now; what works for you?" He manually opens a valve. "There. That's 30." They laugh. Looks like they're manually bypassing the fuse to operate the keel hydraulic pump manually. Neti, on deck, explains that they took a switch from the bilge pump, and rigged up a system where they can move the keel. It's tricky, and in windy conditions would be very hard, because one person would need to be below at all times to move the keel. He then repeats the explanation in Spanish.Closeups of B&G instruments with nothing displayed. Neti, below, explains that they have "No batteries, no systems, nothing." Neti and Joan working in the bottom part of the cabin. Pablo, on the helm, talks about the issue in Spanish. Shot of the compass binnacle. Xabi stands talking on the satellite phone, explaining the situation. Computer screen showing electronic schematics. Neti working on an instrument panel while engine runs. Joan and Neti talking in Spanish. Joan stands on the stern on the sat phone, holding it high for better antennae operation. Closeups of various components. Xabi talks about fuses blowing, the electronics breaking, the PLC (?) broken means they can't control the keel. Working on a workaround. Pablo talks in Spanish in the cockpit. Instruments behind him apear to have readings, though. Pablo, Neti, and Xabi below work on the keel box. Xabi, to the cockpit: 'It's moving. So what do you need now?" They laugh at the response. Neti: "It's 33 now; what works for you?" He manually opens a valve. "There. That's 30." They laugh. Looks like they're manually bypassing the fuse to operate the keel hydraulic pump manually. Neti, on deck, explains that they took a switch from the bilge pump, and rigged up a system where they can move the keel. It's tricky, and in windy conditions would be very hard, because one person would need to be below at all times to move the keel. He then repeats the explanation in Spanish.Wrestling the J0 on the foredeck; stacking it. Pole shots: outboard, rudder, bow, keel. Crewmembers tired, sleeping. Parko: So, over the last two scheds we've been the most western boat. The other boats are pushing down over the top. Clouds... Tough night, quite a few sail changes. It's been a rough one. We've lost quite a few miles. Lost the strong position we were in. Fighting to work east a little bit, to get back in a position where we can tack again. Witty reads a sched from below. Repairs to the top of the daggerboard (I think). Mixing epoxy, applying it.Cool nighttime drone shot of AkzoNobel sailing in light wind under a cloudy sky with lightning flashes visible behind them. In the dark, Jules talks with Simeon about it. Jules explains that they have a supercell behind them. Are concerned about the plate on the keel giving way and letting lots of water into the boat if they go over 20 knots. "It's an interesting evening." Nicolai: "I think it's too early for the J2." He talks about getting a proper thunder cell to get them to the finish. More drone shots. Favoriting for the beautiful drone photography, mostly.Drone shot of AkzoNobel reaching unde the MH0 in 10 knots of wind. Nicolai, below: The keel situation is not improving, unfortunately. It's gone the other way. Bailing... It's coming in quicker than we can almost get it out. Luke: Everyone's tired at the end of our Southern Ocean leg. Having to bail every 15 mintues. In another 6 to 7 hours it will moderate. Shot of bailing. Nicolai: No rules when it comes to fixing boats in the Volvo. You can do whatever you have to. I went into Luke's crew bag and stole one of his socks... Luke: I'm happy to take one for the team, and do what it takes to get us to the finish line. Sandals!Closeups of water leaking out from something below. Simeon explains: He noticed when he was going to light the fire for cooking. Water was squirting out of the cover plate of the keel box. Nicolai talking with him. Brad gets out gear to go for a little swim. "Just jump in for a quick swim and see what I can find." On deck in the pre-dawn. Brad goes down in a survival suit, it looks like, with goggles. He pulls himself down to the keel. Calls for slack. Brad comes back: Two cover plates for the keel box. There's a gaping hole about that big in the bottom of our boat. Should be sealed here (inside). Going to have to come up with a way to sail the boat without pushing water inside the boat. Simeon: A bit of slamming, because of the big speeds, broke part of the cover plate of the keel. Simeon, Jules, and Nicolai discuss. Nicolai on the phone, asking about reinforcing with battens on the inside. Simeon: Keep an eye on it, maybe make some reinforcements. They remove the cover plate inside. Fiddle with reinforcements. Reattaching the cover plate. Beautiful sunset drone shot. Simeon: Not so much a repair as much as a reinforcement. "We think this will bring us to Itajai safely, and otherwise I'll have to sit on top of it."Glassy conditions. Sunrise. Ben cranks the runner. Annemieke on the helm. Flopping. Sailing in rain. Marcus on the bow talks about a bad sched, and TTToP slipped through. And Brunel had a breeze from the east. Still in touch with everyone. A long way to go; can't get too hung up in the emotions of one sched. Pole shots. Trystan stands on the boom looking ahead. Libby and Witty talk about "dot to dot." Witty: I'm going to the bow; I've heard enough. On the bow, he talks about the luck of the draw. Sounds discouraged. Pole shot of the keel underwater. Instruments.Shot of the keel (with something on it?). Nicolas at the nav station: This sched is important; an upcoming tricky wind area. Important to see what wind the other boats have. We see a screenshot showing the sched. Not so bad. Francesca on the helm drinking water. Nicolas comes up and explains the sched. Henry explains: Looks like the northerly option is paying off. Stuck with their plan, and should get back in the game in the next day or so. Now on them to sail the boat faster and warrent being in that position. Liz on the helm. Drone shot.Plastic debris on the keel. Liz: "Still there, Bomby?" She discusses doing a back-down to try to clear the keel when they peel to the J2. Henry talks about the back-down. Slomo of bow during the sail change. Below, Dee talks about the plastic on the keel. Decided not to do the back-down; hoping the bouncing in the waves clear it.Opens with a shot of the boat moving, yay! Shot of the keel. Mark talks about their "totally crazy" night last night. Splits in the fleet, reconvergence. Shots at night of Dongfeng super closer to them. Dongfeng's running lights, sail tapes, silhouetted by a lightning flash. Crew in the cockpit working in red light, illuminated by lightning. Best thing, he says, is they came out ahead, and now they're moving at 12 knots. Looking forward to the NE tradewinds. Stacey talks about how they got showers in the rain last night, and now it's super hot again. In the midst of it, Tony, on the helm, asks her to traveller down; she does it as she continues talking. Interesting that they're trimming the main via traveller from the starboard forward cockpit winch; mainsheet appears to be cleated off. Then we see Nick trimming the headsail; Tony on the helm says, "Stand by for puff. 3, 2, 1, [something]." Nick eases the sheet. "Good puff." (Or maybe "Good pop"? Not sure.) Below, at the nav station, SiFi says they're at 3 degrees south. Slowly making their way through the doldrums. Now in a much more stable breeze of 6-8 knots. Probably another 24 hours of slow going; another night of looking out for clouds. "Wanna make sure we're on our toes." They came out on the good side of it last night, but want to make sure they don't do the opposite tonight. In the cockpit at sunset SiFi gives an update. Phil comes through the hatch, shirtless to show his tattoos, including a full left-arm sleeve and some writing I can't make out on his left side. "News is not good." [Joking? Then he continues to the stern to use the head, I'm assuming.] Mark: "We've got one more night." Phil sings, "One more night!... What song is that?" Martin (I think?) answers: "Phil Collins."Crash cam/stern cam night shot. Boat gybes (or I guess the wind suddenly changes direction) such that the MH0 backs from the port side and they lie over with the keel on the wrong side. Bouwe: "Furl, furl, furl!" "I don't have any runner; I've gotta get the keel up." It's a little frustrating that Yann cuts off the crash-cam footage as soon as he does to go to Rome, the next day, describing what happened. "When you're going that fast and you have big sails up it's hard to keep up with it." More of the stern cam footage. Sally, the next day, explains that they came out of it okay, but lost a lot of distance in the process. Night shots with lightning flashes. Rome: "We were pretty close to MAPFRE and AkzoNobel, and we kinda were on the wrong side of that cloud. The other guys got the best of it, but that's part of sailboat racing, I guess." More night shots. Sally describes how they could see the other boats gaining on AIS, but there wasn't really anything they could do based on their position. Night shots of showering in the squall. Rome and Sally recap that, including the tight space in the optimum shower area under the boom.TTToP slats in the night. Dee, on the foredeck in the morning light talks about the other competitors, the position report coming in in 15 minutes. Sunrise. As the light grows they pick out the other boats. Bernardo takes bearings. At the nav station, Dee checks the sched. "We're still in the lead by four and a half miles." She announces the sched on deck. Vestas is 10 miles away bearing 059. Drone shot pulls away from the crew on the bow. Very high drone shot looking down on them. Pole shot underwater showing the keel. Dee talks about knowing where everyone else is. Difficult bit is in 12 hours when we think the breeze will start to fill. At the moment they're not stressed. Confident in their position. But it's about geting the boat going when the breeze fills. Then the stress will begin.We see the cabin. Kevin is looking down in the hull on the port side of the galley; Fabien and Pascal watch him. Kevin says something in French. Shots of 6 inches of water sloshing around on the port side of the cabin, just in front of the hatch. Fabien explains something to Martin in French; I'm picking up "boat" and "keel". Kevin: "We have a problem with the keel. I don't know exactly why. At this time we want to do a fitting, to change the sail. And Pascal [something] to tell that we had plenty of water and oil in the boat... I hope it is not a problem with the keel ram attached to the boat." Shot of them pumping water out; shot of the port keel ram with water flooding in around its forward end. Jack explains that the port keel ram, which pushes the keel from side to side, where it attaches to the boat the hull fitting has cracked. So a lot of water came into the boat, and they've lost the oil from the ram system. Have turned off the port ram and put oil back into the starboard ram. On deck, Black explains. Below, Kevin operates a hand-held drill pump (adding oil to starboard ram?). He explains that the system is designed to work with only one ram. Below, Charles and Kevin talk in French, and use the starboard ram to operate the keel. Charles, at nav station, explains that they've fixed it, but have lost 10-15 miles and are now close to Vestas and Brunel. He has looked at the routing, and it is helping the fleet catch up. He's hoping they don't lose second place. "We deserve second place."Charles, at the nav station, looking bummed as he looks at routing software. He says it isn't good news; Vestas has passed them and they have not that much wind. (Though looking at the tracker now, I'm not sure Vestas is actually going to get ahead of them.) But they have to gybe, while Dongfeng can go straight to the mark. So he thinks Dongfeng can stay ahead. Not fair, because they are so far apart they have to do different routings, and the routing was poor for them and better for Vestas. Also the keel problem has cost them some key miles; he hopes that isn't the difference between second and third place.