Plastic debris on the keel. Liz: "Still there, Bomby?" She discusses doing a back-down to try to clear the keel when they peel to the J2. Henry talks about the back-down. Slomo of bow during the sail change. Below, Dee talks about the plastic on the keel. Decided not to do the back-down; hoping the bouncing in the waves clear it.Opens with a shot of the boat moving, yay! Shot of the keel. Mark talks about their "totally crazy" night last night. Splits in the fleet, reconvergence. Shots at night of Dongfeng super closer to them. Dongfeng's running lights, sail tapes, silhouetted by a lightning flash. Crew in the cockpit working in red light, illuminated by lightning. Best thing, he says, is they came out ahead, and now they're moving at 12 knots. Looking forward to the NE tradewinds. Stacey talks about how they got showers in the rain last night, and now it's super hot again. In the midst of it, Tony, on the helm, asks her to traveller down; she does it as she continues talking. Interesting that they're trimming the main via traveller from the starboard forward cockpit winch; mainsheet appears to be cleated off. Then we see Nick trimming the headsail; Tony on the helm says, "Stand by for puff. 3, 2, 1, [something]." Nick eases the sheet. "Good puff." (Or maybe "Good pop"? Not sure.) Below, at the nav station, SiFi says they're at 3 degrees south. Slowly making their way through the doldrums. Now in a much more stable breeze of 6-8 knots. Probably another 24 hours of slow going; another night of looking out for clouds. "Wanna make sure we're on our toes." They came out on the good side of it last night, but want to make sure they don't do the opposite tonight. In the cockpit at sunset SiFi gives an update. Phil comes through the hatch, shirtless to show his tattoos, including a full left-arm sleeve and some writing I can't make out on his left side. "News is not good." [Joking? Then he continues to the stern to use the head, I'm assuming.] Mark: "We've got one more night." Phil sings, "One more night!... What song is that?" Martin (I think?) answers: "Phil Collins."Crash cam/stern cam night shot. Boat gybes (or I guess the wind suddenly changes direction) such that the MH0 backs from the port side and they lie over with the keel on the wrong side. Bouwe: "Furl, furl, furl!" "I don't have any runner; I've gotta get the keel up." It's a little frustrating that Yann cuts off the crash-cam footage as soon as he does to go to Rome, the next day, describing what happened. "When you're going that fast and you have big sails up it's hard to keep up with it." More of the stern cam footage. Sally, the next day, explains that they came out of it okay, but lost a lot of distance in the process. Night shots with lightning flashes. Rome: "We were pretty close to MAPFRE and AkzoNobel, and we kinda were on the wrong side of that cloud. The other guys got the best of it, but that's part of sailboat racing, I guess." More night shots. Sally describes how they could see the other boats gaining on AIS, but there wasn't really anything they could do based on their position. Night shots of showering in the squall. Rome and Sally recap that, including the tight space in the optimum shower area under the boom.TTToP slats in the night. Dee, on the foredeck in the morning light talks about the other competitors, the position report coming in in 15 minutes. Sunrise. As the light grows they pick out the other boats. Bernardo takes bearings. At the nav station, Dee checks the sched. "We're still in the lead by four and a half miles." She announces the sched on deck. Vestas is 10 miles away bearing 059. Drone shot pulls away from the crew on the bow. Very high drone shot looking down on them. Pole shot underwater showing the keel. Dee talks about knowing where everyone else is. Difficult bit is in 12 hours when we think the breeze will start to fill. At the moment they're not stressed. Confident in their position. But it's about geting the boat going when the breeze fills. Then the stress will begin.We see the cabin. Kevin is looking down in the hull on the port side of the galley; Fabien and Pascal watch him. Kevin says something in French. Shots of 6 inches of water sloshing around on the port side of the cabin, just in front of the hatch. Fabien explains something to Martin in French; I'm picking up "boat" and "keel". Kevin: "We have a problem with the keel. I don't know exactly why. At this time we want to do a fitting, to change the sail. And Pascal [something] to tell that we had plenty of water and oil in the boat... I hope it is not a problem with the keel ram attached to the boat." Shot of them pumping water out; shot of the port keel ram with water flooding in around its forward end. Jack explains that the port keel ram, which pushes the keel from side to side, where it attaches to the boat the hull fitting has cracked. So a lot of water came into the boat, and they've lost the oil from the ram system. Have turned off the port ram and put oil back into the starboard ram. On deck, Black explains. Below, Kevin operates a hand-held drill pump (adding oil to starboard ram?). He explains that the system is designed to work with only one ram. Below, Charles and Kevin talk in French, and use the starboard ram to operate the keel. Charles, at nav station, explains that they've fixed it, but have lost 10-15 miles and are now close to Vestas and Brunel. He has looked at the routing, and it is helping the fleet catch up. He's hoping they don't lose second place. "We deserve second place."Charles, at the nav station, looking bummed as he looks at routing software. He says it isn't good news; Vestas has passed them and they have not that much wind. (Though looking at the tracker now, I'm not sure Vestas is actually going to get ahead of them.) But they have to gybe, while Dongfeng can go straight to the mark. So he thinks Dongfeng can stay ahead. Not fair, because they are so far apart they have to do different routings, and the routing was poor for them and better for Vestas. Also the keel problem has cost them some key miles; he hopes that isn't the difference between second and third place.