Jena trims as they sail upwind toward the Norway turning mark. Hoisting the A3 in preparation for the rounding. Other boats already having rounded. Stacey: Arriving at the first mark on the coast of Norway. It's midnight and the sun's coming up. The cherry red boats have just rounded, and Akzo is just behind us. SiFi points out the buoy. Stacking to leeward in preparation for the rounding. SiFi calls the time to the tack: 1:10. Charlie calls the tack from the helm. Buoy wiht the moon behind it. Charlie calls the deploy. Sailing downwind with the sunrise behind them. TTToP on their weather quarter tacking for the mark. Tony fiddling with the outrigger. SiFi laughs about the midsummer night, relates the events of the beat up. Happy to have got out in third, and slightly faster than the boats ahead at the moment, so it's all good.Sailing into the twilight. Peter says something about the stack. Hoisting a sail on the bow. Vestas passing them with the moon behind them. Ooh; this is the mark rounding off Norway. A motorboat cruises alongside. TTToP passes them still going upwind. Bouwe: Just passed the mark at Norway. Not the position we wanted to be in, but still a lot of the leg to go. I think the sun is coming up again, even though it's 1:30 or 2:00 at night. It's just one of these things that we remember, how fortunate we are that we can sail in these kinds of conditions.Capey looks at the nav computer, goes thorugh the other boats' positions. Sunrise shot of MAPFRE sailing on their port beam. Alberto talks about the position of the other boats. MAPFRE gaining on us due to some current line, probably. Shot of the old crescent moon.Night shot of the moon. Instruments. Marie trimming, silhouetted by the moon on the water. Kevin, in the galley: 2 hours for the finish line. For the burger it's 5. We have no more food. He talks to Pascal at the nav station in French. Charles: Will it be a good or a bad surprise? Who knows? Pascal reads the sched: windspeed and distance for the boats ahead. Jack does an interview at night on deck: So we are currently t-minus 20 miles from Cardiff. (Marie's voice: Tacking! Tacking!) Jack raises a finger and gets up to help with the tack; Jeremie chuckles. We see them tack the MH0. Jack: It's quite light; quite upwind. But we have the current with us now which is great. Still pretty tedious now, actually. He and Carolijn talk to Jeremie on the bow. Carolijn: Hopefully, Akzo will catch Brunel. Jack: Turn the Tide catch MAPFRE... We're golden. (Carolijn laughs.) Carolijn: Scallywag... Jack: Scallywag roll everyone. Charles with a headlamp talks to Jeremie: Would have been better to be first. But Brunel and Akzo did a better leg than us. Sometimes in the Volvo it's not the best offshore team win the leg, eh? We have seen that in Newport. Jeremie: Maybe you should do more inshore sailing. Charles: Maybe. The Volvo is about the last 20 miles. Pascal: I don't know why but I think there is more wind here. It is more dark. Chuckles. Tacking in the dark.Night drone shots with the reflective branding standing out. Interesting that the drone has a light source. Moon.Moonlight overhead. A small bird (a swallow?) on the deck in the semi-darkness. Instruments. Tony on the helm. Talks about having reached the north Atlantic. 1 degree south. Getting into shifty breeze. Hopefully 30 hours from now we'll be in the trades. Looking pretty good at the moment. Got a lot of boats close; "at the pointy end of the fleet, which is a good place to be." Talks about the doldrums.Night time; red instruments. Sound of water. Stu, below: Sailing at night on these boats... can rely on the feel; sometimes it's even faster. Generally a more serious feel to night sailing. Shots of them sailing at night. Stu calls trim from the foredeck: "A little bit of masthead on." Shifting the stack. Kevin, in the morning: There are not many sports. Not many moments in life you are able to (something) during the night. Pascal comes up and kisses him on the cheek. Kevin: I love ocean sailing. You feel like you're living your life fully. More night shots: Carolijn shines a light on the sails. Horace: Sometimes you're very tired. Normally during the night you're still sailing, fighting, with the other competitors. But it's cool. This is life in the volvo ocean race. More night shots. Daryl, on the helm: "It's fully done on feel, and what the boat's behaving like. It's pretty cool when you get it right. Not so good when you get it wrong." (he laughs) Carolijn: Besides the feel, you use the numbers on the mast. We put them in night-vision mode, so instead of white they're red. To avoid blinding you. We see the deck instrument readouts switch from white to red. Kevin: Jokes about seeing the head torch of Pascal looking out the hatch, blinding them. Marie, below: Yesterday was good because we had a bird for 2 or 3 hours. He just turned around the top of hte mast. Sometimes we had the shadow. It was really cool. Night shots in which you can't really see; I'll take their word for it. Moon, clouds. Night drone shot with light on the mainsail.Nicolas looks concerned. Maneuver in twilight. Stacking forward. Nicolas: Because the wind is a bit different than expected, we are going to see Vestas. Vestas has just gybed, probably because they can see Dongfeng and Dongfeng has gybed. So now we've gybed. Nicolas looks through binoculars. Nicolas, below, talks about the achievement, racing big boats around the world. Enjoying the moment. Sailing at night. Moon above the mast. Drone shot of TTToP gybing from port to starboard with Vestas ahead of them. Drone shot of them sailing on starboard with Vestas to leeward. Liz rubs her face: A really annoying blue boat catching up. And a really annoying red boat [Dongfeng] catching up. And a really annoying yellow boat [Brunel]. Liz talks about Nicolas being a one-design racer, and his French humor. Nicolas: We had quite a hard night... Lost a lot to Vestas, Dongfeng, and Brunel. But now everyone is within a few miles. It's a bit of a mess with the wind; there are clouds everywhere. Wind very different than expected. I try to understand what's happening now, and what's going to happen in the next hours. Nicolas at nav station. Nicolas talks a below about French sailing culture versus the rest of the world.Capey at the nav station. He comes on deck, reports on the competition to Peter. Sam: What's the concern, Pete? Peter: Capey's our navigator. He's very experienced. It was his tenth time around the Horn. Does an incredible job on the charts, keeping us safe. (Capey pees off the transom in the background, then moves gingerly around with an obviously painful back issue.) Peter tries to engage him in the story; Capey's not having any of it. Just talks about the race. Bouwe: I think he's one of the best in the world. And we just have that mutual understanding. It's straightforward. You have a plan, and you execute the plan. I think that's why I like to sail with him. Abby comes up and does a Capey impression. "It's that itme of day and I'm coming through." She goes to the stern to mime pooping. A funky yellow fishing boat comes by: Drone shots from close aboard as they haul pots. Carlo: I had wet boots in the Southern Ocean, and this nail, for some reason, is starting to fall off. He shows his left big toe, which looks kind of scary and discolored. Carlo: Capey says we're driving in about two hours. Have Akzo to windward. Need to put a second sheet on the masthead zero. We see from the drone as Nina puts the sheet on. Bouwe talks about a big cloud, and how it affects the wind. He explains that they'll probably gain some on Akzo due to the cloud. "Very often the luck of the draw is involved in it." Drone shot of hte stern, bow, and barbecue on the aft deck of a big container ship: "Shanghai Highway". Crew of the ship waves and jumps up and down. Kyle, in the sunset: Had a lovely day today. Sam had the drone over a container ship where they were having a lovely barbecue. Nina: I feel like Kyle has his Saturday best on. "It's a good day for Kyle; maybe not for us." Beautiful sunset clouds, slomo with moon.Night shot with moon behind clouds. Francesca, below in red light: I'm Francesca from Turn the Tide on Plastic. We are sailing just over a big cloud. The last sched was really good. Second sched in a row where we are leading, so it's fantastic. Wind conditions are tricky, up and down, try to focus on the trim, sail as fast as possible. We'll see tomorrow morning, but we think we are doing a really solid leg right now. Just need to keep doing it for another two weeks. And we will see.Time lapse from the stern cam as darkness falls. Simeon, below, talks about the wind dropping and going right. Probably will do the stack and get on the hip of those guys. Below, Martine and Brad stacking. Jules at the nav station. Night shot of stars, moon. Luke, in the dark, explains that they're right on the crossover of the J1 and the Masthead 0, and it's difficult to know if they should change or not, if the better sail will pay for the loss incurred in the sail change. "Where we are in the fleet at the moment we can't afford to make any losses."Setting moon behind the clew of the MH0 as TTToP sails on starboard. Camera pans to starboard to show the sunrise. Liz, on the helm: Slowly escaping the little ball of high pressure we've been stuck in. In the last sched MAPFRE was doing 3 knots slower, more stuck in it. On the bow, Bianca looks at a mess. "We've had birds go on the boat, but I think this might be squid ink. A bit of an explosion." Shot looking aft from the end of the bowsprit (go Sam!) as Bianca rigs a furler on the red tack line. Bianca: Unfortunately we got stuck in the high. On the pedestal, Brian talks about their narrow (possible) escape from the clutches of the high pressure. Graphic: What's stuck in everyone's head today? Francesca dances and sings: I'll follow you, deep sea baby... Henry sings, someone (Bianca? Whoever's trimming the main with her face concealed in a balaclava) sings, Francesca sings. Then Bleddyn recites: I'll follow you. Deep sea baby. Title: 743 nm to Itajai.Sailing in the pre-dawn. "Beautiful morning." Full moon. Kyle and Abby do winch repair in the half-light. Kyle: Got a bit of wind coming in the next 24 hours, and the winch has had a few issues, so we're just pulling it apart and servicing it. Bouwe talks about winning the leg being a really nice icing on the cake after being first to Cape Horn. Disappointing results up to now, getting better and better, but the results haven't been there. But we've seen in previous races that a lot can happen from Brazil to the finish. So if we can score maximum points, maybe the cards will be a little bit on our favor.Brunel sails downwind. Crew in the cockpit, at the mast. Abby comes below, inspects the steering hardware in the stern. Kyle, below: Talks about receiving the news about the loss of John Fisher. Absolutely devastating for everyone on board. Naturally morale is down. Thoughts are first and foremost with those guys; racing is secondary. Nina talks about it: Makes everything out here very real; all the risks involved. On deck, crew working in the cockpit. Below, Someone (Thomas?) grimacing as he works on something involving his hand, and blood. Abby, below: Movement of the boat is heinous. So just trying to take care of yourself, bit of an eye infection (she indicates her swollen, red eyelids) gets lower down on the priority list. Looking forward to flat water. Nina, Kyle eating. Kyle talks about how hazardous it is: Yann (OBR) fell and hurt his back. Nina fell and hit her head. Abby took a runner block to the head. "These boats are dangerous and this is a dangerous part of the world." Abby: Nina was in the head area, and we nosedived, and the boat comes to a sudden stop, and I watched her go from the head to the forward bulkhead and landed on her head. Looked awful, and I thought there was going to be serious injury. Nina: I tried to move my fingers and toes... Went straight into her bunk. Thnks she was really lucky. It's really dangerous for smaller people; ther'es nothing to hold onto. Dusk shots in the cockpit as they sail fast with the moon ahead of them.Final approach to New Zealand; MAPFRE behind them. Kevin explains: Very tight with MAPFRE, 3 other boats ahead of them. Hard to believe in a few hours they'll have 25 knots of wind gybing for the finish of the leg .Will have to push to keep them behind. Daryl trims. Black, on the bow, talks about strategy. MAPFRE alongside, 100 yards away. MAPFRE ahead of them and to leeward. Charles: Can see Akzo and TTToP. They're in a light spot. Dongfeng and MAPFRE are offshore, fighting again. Jeremie explains that there's only 112 miles left. Some maneuvers. Need to be quite focused. MAPFRE now ahead of them. Keep working, keep focused. Everyone slept a bit today, so they're fresh. No mistake and hope for a good result. Sunset behind land. Moon. Carolijn, looking forward: "MAPFRE looks really soft at the moment. Stay high."Sailing in light air in the moonlight. Witty at the nav station talks about how anything could happen. "It is entertaining and it keeps us all awake." Sunrise: We see AkzoNobel on the horizon. Crew talks about how it's insane that they're a mile away. "We've been further away in in-port races." Trystan on the helm talks about the competition. "It's all on." Shot of the land as they sail quietly past. Marcus: Almost there. "Cool sunrise." Annemieke on the foredeck points out AkzoNobel. "21 days of sailing, and you're in a match-race battle... Can't be more beautiful." Shots of AkzoNobel drifting a mile away. Witty trimming witih New Zealand shore behind him. Quiet, intense sailing.Nighttime view up the main with the moon. A bird (from the silhouette it looks like a booby) perches on the head of the mainsail, then flies around near the masthead. Bianca talks about it. Henry: It's like the third bird encounter we've had. High drone shot during the day showing birds flying around them. Slomo shot of a booby (good view of it; I should check to ID it.) Lucas explains that they've just gone through the channel off New Caledonia's northwest tip. At the nav station, Brian and Nicolas talk about the passage, and about working out strategy. Brian focuses more on the next 6 hours. Dee, on the helm, says she doesn't know if having 2 navigators is a help or a hindrance. Brian jokes about them not fighting for the trackball. Dee talks about how it's good that they have a navigator looking at the strategic situation 24 hours a day, while still getting rest. Dee: So far it's worked out quite well for us. Below, Brian lies down to sleep while Nicolas continues at the nav station. High drone shot, again with birds. Nicolas talks with Annalise on deck. She wants some pineapple. Nicolas says they have some dried pineapple? Annalise: Yeah. And you're always pretty lucky if you get any. Annalise: Hopefully Akzo and Scally are in the 3-4 knots forecast up there (gesturing ahead). Nicolas talks about the wind.Daryl smiles at the camera, making a picture frame with his hands. Black reaises his eyebrows. Kevin has a black eye. MAPFRE is two boatlengths to leeward. Then they pass them; MAPFRE points up off their stern. Then we see a shot of MAPFRE two miles astern. Marie: You have to change my fan. She jokes with Kevin. She says something to Black, below, about finding a bag. Kevin cranks a winch in the rain. Stacking in the squall: bringing the sails aft and to weather. Shot of the mainstail, looking up. Carolijn: I didn't expect it to be such a delight to leave the doldrums. But it is. "Not 100% sure. But keeping my fingers crossed and hoping I'm right... We're finally alone. We've split tacks with the other red boat. The bungee has snapped... See if we can catch the others now." Kevin on the helm. The crescent moon off the leech of the main. Black explains that they have finally broken away from MAFPRE, and can't see Brunel. Sunset.Peter goes aloft. GoPro shots. He calls the wind: "Absolutely nothing 2 miles in front." Bouwe: "Can we get him a bit higher? I can still hear him." Laughter. Back on deck, he points around at the lack of wind. Crew stacks forward behind him. "Just giving the guys some shit about their trim." On the bow, Carlo: "Had a bit of a fight with Turn the Tide. We parked and they sailed around us and never stopped. About 12 miles ahead of us. We just had no breeze at all. Shots of TTToP sailing past them. Lowering the J1 to peel to the MH0. Stacking aft. TTToP sailing a quarter mile to leeward. Sally: "I feel like they had no board the whole time." Carlo talks about the frustration, heat below, almost impossible to sleep. Especially when we have to run the engine. Shot below with engine running of crew trying to sleep in the bow. Sunset clouds in glassy conditions. Rain in the distance. Crescent moon. Rain in the dawn. Bouwe: It's still all right. Breeze should fill in from the east, and we are the easternmost boat. Not going to be a good sched because they've been very slow for the last several hours. "A crystal ball would have been nice."In the morning light, Ben stands on the boom to look through binoculars ahead of them. Ben: "We've seen a sailing boat with a square-topped mainsail and a masthead sail, so we think it might be one of the other Volvos." Have been following them in the sched, and now have seen them in real life. Below, Libby calls out the latest sched. Sounds pretty happy. "Spotted Brunel about 40 minutes ago off our windward bow." Crew eats breakfast on the bow, talking about it. Witty: "One or two days ago we were a hundred miles behind the leaders." Ben: "We had to fucking work pretty hard the last two days." John talks about how they've worked hard, so to get where they can actually see and identify a yacht is cool. Witty talks about not giving up, keeping trying. "It's a really important leg for us. It would be catastrophic to come in last." Night shots of lightning. Witty on a PA tells the crew about Brunel being 9 miles away on AIS. "We're winning the sched for the first time, so well done lads." Talks about a rain cloud. "We've got this rain cloud which looks [BLEEP] horrendous." Beautiful shot of the waning gibbous moon rising through clouds behind the helmsman, silhouetting him. Next day, Witty talks on deck sounding despondent about getting stuck in the rain cloud with no wind. We see Libby at the nav station with Grant looking at Expedition's "Strip Chart" display. Libby: "True wind angle's at 120 here." Grant [pointing]: "So all this is starboard gybe..." Witty talks about losing 50 miles when they got stuck in the cloud and the other boats didn't. "probably lost 10 of the 30 miles there, and then we lost 20 of the 30 miles sailing 170 degrees off course... "We just did one of the stupidest things ever and now we're 30 miles behind running last again... We're the ones letting ourselves down. It's not bad luck; we're just being idiots. And we deserve to be here at the moment. And I'm just concerned that you don't get too many chances in this quality fleet to go from 30 miles behind or 100 miles behind to back in the lead. Somehow we've got 3,000 miles to figure out how we're going to do it. Again." He and Grant sit on the bow discussing it.Night shots: looking up from the stern at the full moon behind clouds. Wake. Jérémie's hands on the wheel; him steering. Charles, standing forward of the wheel, talks in French. Looking up the mast at stars. Then, in the daytime, we see rain falling to weather. Franck and Jérémie look that way. Horace looks through binoculars. To weather we see three competitors. From left to right: AkzoNobel, MAPFRE, and Vestas. Justine explains: They were leading, hit a squall, the boats to weather stayed in more pressure and now they're all in a line again. "It's a bit disappointing but it happens sometimes." Jérémie jokes about how he was on watch and lost 10 miles. Daryl jokes with him; Charles steers. Crew works in the cockpit (sail change?). Charles: Not sure they're already in the doldrums. But for sure is a new start. And after leading the race most of the time from the start of the leg, all the boats are in the same line now: Akzo, MAPFRE. Now they'll have two or three days in light winds, and maybe will determine the race who escapes from it first and gets the new wind. Shot of AkzoNobel close to leeward. Horace: "Not easy, not what we want, but this is the Volvo Ocean Race. No one knows what will happen at the end." Talks about how it's too hot, and he wants to take off his "everything."TTToP sails at night with the full moon behind the sails. MAPFRE sails a few hudred yards away, below and slightly ahead of them. MAPFRE appears to be sailing slightly higher; they discuss that they might end up in their bad air. In the dark, Brian (Thompson), who's on the pedestal, explains the current situation to Brian (Carlin): In the middle of the Coral Sea, slightly north of Lord Howe Island, in a match race with MAPFRE and Vestas. He explains that it's helping them tune up and sail faster to be sailing next to the two boats. Liz, on the helm, talks about how it's pretty intense sailing close to the two boats. "Brian's down there calling relatives and we're just trying to match them." Dee, at the nav station: "Intense but exciting." Elodie, on the rail with binoculars, looks ahead and to port. "They look really loose on everything, that boat." She talks about how interesting it is that MAPFRE is sailing relatively high, while Vestas is managing to soak down without losing too much speed. "We're a bit the cheese in the sandwich here." Martin, looking to starboard with binoculars: "They've got sails in front and behind the shrouds as well." (Think he's talking about the stack.) Bernardo, trimming: "I'm smiling becuase I'm enjoying it. I don't have any reason not to smile." Dee, at the nav station: "I'm so proud to see these guys develop before your eyes... I'm a proud mum." Drone shots of TTToP sailing at sunrise on port gybe. Crew is shifting the stack. MAPFRE is visible ahead and to starboard.Drone shot AT NIGHT of AkzoNobel silhouetted against the trail of the nearly full moon on the water behind them. Masthead red running light is visible, also four different white lights. Not sure what's up with those. Sail-illumination lights? Brad, on deck: "Beautiful night out here." Talks about chipping away at Dongfeng, who crossed them by 2.5 miles, and are now 5 miles away. Gybe coming up; hope to make more gains there. Simeon, at nav station below, nods to Sam. Simeon: "Yeah. Pretty happy." Luke, on deck on the wheel (I think): "Warm water. Full moon. Doesn't get any better... Great company. Go the A-team on here." Shot of Orion standing on his head next to the shrouds. Shot of the helmsman from the cockpit, then pans up the backstay to show the Southern Cross. Drone shot close to the boat from to leeward, illuminated by moonlight.Dim moonlight shot from the cabin of the cockpit as TTToP sails on starboard gybe. On deck, we see the crew stacking with the new-risen full moon ahead of them. Working on the stack, Bernardo talks about how with the moonlight it's helpful; almost need sunglasses. They can see what they're doing, see the swells for surfing. Shot of stars (planets?) low to the horizon to starboard. Shots of the moon. Bernardo: "Let's see for how many days we have this lucky and beautiful moon."Night shot of the cockpit. Crew on the pedestal grinding with red headlamps on while the full moon illuminates clouds and the ocean behind them. Another boat can be seen a hundred yards away on their port side; TTToP gybes. Looks like the gybe they made around 1445 on 2018-01-02, which would mean that's Scallywag next to them. We see Scallywag sailing in the moonlight on their port side. On their starboard quarter we see what I think is South West Island with a light on it (FL 4 sec?).Drone shost of Scallywag sailing close-hauled on port tack with the MH0 in 8 knots of wind. Steve, at the nav station, talks about making mistakes, taking your losses early. Shot aft from the cabin with crew silhouetted after sunset. Closeup of Alex on the helm with the waxing crescent (southern hemisphere) moon above him. Wake after sunset. Witty, at the nav station: "The Plastics are 2 miles directly on our bow." We see a shot in the morning with TTToP ahead of them. Witty talks about AkzoNobel being close as well. "So basically it's 3 miles between 3 boats... with 570 miles to go." Shot of TTToP ahead and to weather. Witty on the helm. Witty: "It will probably come down to a bit of luck more than a bit of management. And we don't seem to have any of that these days. We'll see what happens." Parko on the helm with TTToP ahead of them. Parko: "Less than a hoedown to go, gentleman." (?) Witty, below: "We haven't had much go our way this leg, so we might get a bit (something) when we need it." Talks about getting ahead of Akzo, then losing it. Crew trimming and steering in the cockpit.Night-vision shot looking aft from the bow cam as Vestas sails on starboard gybe. Looks like they're triple-heading, with the J2 in the foreground and the J3 in the background; presumably there's a Code 0 or A3 set on the bowsprit. We hear cockpit audio; a voice (Nick's?) says, "Yeah; I'm gonna go to the rig. Wait 'till everybody's ready." Then we see a night-vision shot of the stern camera looking forward with four grinders on the handles; maybe the beginning of a sail change or gybe? Then we get an artsy shot out the cabin looking aft with the crew at the back of the boat silhouetted by the rising moon. Waning-gibbous moonrise would be in the early evening, so I'm guessing this shot is around 2000-2100. There's a light visible low, near the horizon; it might be on Madeira, but at their closest after gybing they were 22 nm from Madeira, which seems like a long way. The other possibility is that it's Brunel's starboard masthead running light, which was in the right place about 10 nm behind them. Slomo shots of the crew silhouetted against the moon; washing machine. Below, we see crew stacking gear on the starboard side. SiFi, at the nav station, talks about how they're west of Madeira looking for wind acceleration, and about the nearby competitors. Slomo shot from the cabin of someone securing one of the two cabin hatches in place.Stacey, on deck in drifting conditions at sunset: "I've been looking to see the green flash my entire life. I reckon I saw every sunset in the last race and never once saw the green flash." Tony: "A lot of people think it's mythical, but I can assure you it's real. I've got non-believers laughing at me down the hatch right now." Nick (?) from below: "No, no, no, seriously; I'm sure there'll be a unicorn under that flash." Other voice: "I've seen it." Tony: "Also a member of the Flat Earth Society." Shot of dusk, young moon over calm sea. SiFi, at nav station: "MAPFRE up here to the north. She's going quite well. She's still in an easterly... Have to hope a little bit. Hope we get round in front of them."Night shot of the young moon over the heads of the crew in the cockpit. Stu, below, talks about the night. It was hectic, it got dark, they entered the Strait of Gibraltar, forecast was for winds over 30 knots especially on the exit. They first reefed with the Masthead 0, then peeled to the Fractional 0. "It's far too early in the race to be risking anything. Nice short sea state; wind against tide. So we've got plenty on at the moment. The wet-weather gear is getting a good working. Just have to survive for the next few hours and the breeze should drop off again." Crew in the cockpit; Pascal at the nav station. Stacking below. Night vision shots of crew in the cockpit gybing reefed main, washing machine, foredeck.AkzoNobel sails fast under on port gybe after sunset. Young moon is low ahead of them. I think they're carrying the Fractional 0 and a reefed main. Wake shot.