In the morning light, Ben stands on the boom to look through binoculars ahead of them. Ben: "We've seen a sailing boat with a square-topped mainsail and a masthead sail, so we think it might be one of the other Volvos." Have been following them in the sched, and now have seen them in real life. Below, Libby calls out the latest sched. Sounds pretty happy. "Spotted Brunel about 40 minutes ago off our windward bow." Crew eats breakfast on the bow, talking about it. Witty: "One or two days ago we were a hundred miles behind the leaders." Ben: "We had to fucking work pretty hard the last two days." John talks about how they've worked hard, so to get where they can actually see and identify a yacht is cool. Witty talks about not giving up, keeping trying. "It's a really important leg for us. It would be catastrophic to come in last." Night shots of lightning. Witty on a PA tells the crew about Brunel being 9 miles away on AIS. "We're winning the sched for the first time, so well done lads." Talks about a rain cloud. "We've got this rain cloud which looks [BLEEP] horrendous." Beautiful shot of the waning gibbous moon rising through clouds behind the helmsman, silhouetting him. Next day, Witty talks on deck sounding despondent about getting stuck in the rain cloud with no wind. We see Libby at the nav station with Grant looking at Expedition's "Strip Chart" display. Libby: "True wind angle's at 120 here." Grant [pointing]: "So all this is starboard gybe..." Witty talks about losing 50 miles when they got stuck in the cloud and the other boats didn't. "probably lost 10 of the 30 miles there, and then we lost 20 of the 30 miles sailing 170 degrees off course... "We just did one of the stupidest things ever and now we're 30 miles behind running last again... We're the ones letting ourselves down. It's not bad luck; we're just being idiots. And we deserve to be here at the moment. And I'm just concerned that you don't get too many chances in this quality fleet to go from 30 miles behind or 100 miles behind to back in the lead. Somehow we've got 3,000 miles to figure out how we're going to do it. Again." He and Grant sit on the bow discussing it.Night shots: looking up from the stern at the full moon behind clouds. Wake. Jérémie's hands on the wheel; him steering. Charles, standing forward of the wheel, talks in French. Looking up the mast at stars. Then, in the daytime, we see rain falling to weather. Franck and Jérémie look that way. Horace looks through binoculars. To weather we see three competitors. From left to right: AkzoNobel, MAPFRE, and Vestas. Justine explains: They were leading, hit a squall, the boats to weather stayed in more pressure and now they're all in a line again. "It's a bit disappointing but it happens sometimes." Jérémie jokes about how he was on watch and lost 10 miles. Daryl jokes with him; Charles steers. Crew works in the cockpit (sail change?). Charles: Not sure they're already in the doldrums. But for sure is a new start. And after leading the race most of the time from the start of the leg, all the boats are in the same line now: Akzo, MAPFRE. Now they'll have two or three days in light winds, and maybe will determine the race who escapes from it first and gets the new wind. Shot of AkzoNobel close to leeward. Horace: "Not easy, not what we want, but this is the Volvo Ocean Race. No one knows what will happen at the end." Talks about how it's too hot, and he wants to take off his "everything."TTToP sails at night with the full moon behind the sails. MAPFRE sails a few hudred yards away, below and slightly ahead of them. MAPFRE appears to be sailing slightly higher; they discuss that they might end up in their bad air. In the dark, Brian (Thompson), who's on the pedestal, explains the current situation to Brian (Carlin): In the middle of the Coral Sea, slightly north of Lord Howe Island, in a match race with MAPFRE and Vestas. He explains that it's helping them tune up and sail faster to be sailing next to the two boats. Liz, on the helm, talks about how it's pretty intense sailing close to the two boats. "Brian's down there calling relatives and we're just trying to match them." Dee, at the nav station: "Intense but exciting." Elodie, on the rail with binoculars, looks ahead and to port. "They look really loose on everything, that boat." She talks about how interesting it is that MAPFRE is sailing relatively high, while Vestas is managing to soak down without losing too much speed. "We're a bit the cheese in the sandwich here." Martin, looking to starboard with binoculars: "They've got sails in front and behind the shrouds as well." (Think he's talking about the stack.) Bernardo, trimming: "I'm smiling becuase I'm enjoying it. I don't have any reason not to smile." Dee, at the nav station: "I'm so proud to see these guys develop before your eyes... I'm a proud mum." Drone shots of TTToP sailing at sunrise on port gybe. Crew is shifting the stack. MAPFRE is visible ahead and to starboard.Drone shot AT NIGHT of AkzoNobel silhouetted against the trail of the nearly full moon on the water behind them. Masthead red running light is visible, also four different white lights. Not sure what's up with those. Sail-illumination lights? Brad, on deck: "Beautiful night out here." Talks about chipping away at Dongfeng, who crossed them by 2.5 miles, and are now 5 miles away. Gybe coming up; hope to make more gains there. Simeon, at nav station below, nods to Sam. Simeon: "Yeah. Pretty happy." Luke, on deck on the wheel (I think): "Warm water. Full moon. Doesn't get any better... Great company. Go the A-team on here." Shot of Orion standing on his head next to the shrouds. Shot of the helmsman from the cockpit, then pans up the backstay to show the Southern Cross. Drone shot close to the boat from to leeward, illuminated by moonlight.Dim moonlight shot from the cabin of the cockpit as TTToP sails on starboard gybe. On deck, we see the crew stacking with the new-risen full moon ahead of them. Working on the stack, Bernardo talks about how with the moonlight it's helpful; almost need sunglasses. They can see what they're doing, see the swells for surfing. Shot of stars (planets?) low to the horizon to starboard. Shots of the moon. Bernardo: "Let's see for how many days we have this lucky and beautiful moon."Night shot of the cockpit. Crew on the pedestal grinding with red headlamps on while the full moon illuminates clouds and the ocean behind them. Another boat can be seen a hundred yards away on their port side; TTToP gybes. Looks like the gybe they made around 1445 on 2018-01-02, which would mean that's Scallywag next to them. We see Scallywag sailing in the moonlight on their port side. On their starboard quarter we see what I think is South West Island with a light on it (FL 4 sec?).Drone shost of Scallywag sailing close-hauled on port tack with the MH0 in 8 knots of wind. Steve, at the nav station, talks about making mistakes, taking your losses early. Shot aft from the cabin with crew silhouetted after sunset. Closeup of Alex on the helm with the waxing crescent (southern hemisphere) moon above him. Wake after sunset. Witty, at the nav station: "The Plastics are 2 miles directly on our bow." We see a shot in the morning with TTToP ahead of them. Witty talks about AkzoNobel being close as well. "So basically it's 3 miles between 3 boats... with 570 miles to go." Shot of TTToP ahead and to weather. Witty on the helm. Witty: "It will probably come down to a bit of luck more than a bit of management. And we don't seem to have any of that these days. We'll see what happens." Parko on the helm with TTToP ahead of them. Parko: "Less than a hoedown to go, gentleman." (?) Witty, below: "We haven't had much go our way this leg, so we might get a bit (something) when we need it." Talks about getting ahead of Akzo, then losing it. Crew trimming and steering in the cockpit.Night-vision shot looking aft from the bow cam as Vestas sails on starboard gybe. Looks like they're triple-heading, with the J2 in the foreground and the J3 in the background; presumably there's a Code 0 or A3 set on the bowsprit. We hear cockpit audio; a voice (Nick's?) says, "Yeah; I'm gonna go to the rig. Wait 'till everybody's ready." Then we see a night-vision shot of the stern camera looking forward with four grinders on the handles; maybe the beginning of a sail change or gybe? Then we get an artsy shot out the cabin looking aft with the crew at the back of the boat silhouetted by the rising moon. Waning-gibbous moonrise would be in the early evening, so I'm guessing this shot is around 2000-2100. There's a light visible low, near the horizon; it might be on Madeira, but at their closest after gybing they were 22 nm from Madeira, which seems like a long way. The other possibility is that it's Brunel's starboard masthead running light, which was in the right place about 10 nm behind them. Slomo shots of the crew silhouetted against the moon; washing machine. Below, we see crew stacking gear on the starboard side. SiFi, at the nav station, talks about how they're west of Madeira looking for wind acceleration, and about the nearby competitors. Slomo shot from the cabin of someone securing one of the two cabin hatches in place.Stacey, on deck in drifting conditions at sunset: "I've been looking to see the green flash my entire life. I reckon I saw every sunset in the last race and never once saw the green flash." Tony: "A lot of people think it's mythical, but I can assure you it's real. I've got non-believers laughing at me down the hatch right now." Nick (?) from below: "No, no, no, seriously; I'm sure there'll be a unicorn under that flash." Other voice: "I've seen it." Tony: "Also a member of the Flat Earth Society." Shot of dusk, young moon over calm sea. SiFi, at nav station: "MAPFRE up here to the north. She's going quite well. She's still in an easterly... Have to hope a little bit. Hope we get round in front of them."Night shot of the young moon over the heads of the crew in the cockpit. Stu, below, talks about the night. It was hectic, it got dark, they entered the Strait of Gibraltar, forecast was for winds over 30 knots especially on the exit. They first reefed with the Masthead 0, then peeled to the Fractional 0. "It's far too early in the race to be risking anything. Nice short sea state; wind against tide. So we've got plenty on at the moment. The wet-weather gear is getting a good working. Just have to survive for the next few hours and the breeze should drop off again." Crew in the cockpit; Pascal at the nav station. Stacking below. Night vision shots of crew in the cockpit gybing reefed main, washing machine, foredeck.AkzoNobel sails fast under on port gybe after sunset. Young moon is low ahead of them. I think they're carrying the Fractional 0 and a reefed main. Wake shot.