High drone shot of Dongfeng sailing in light winds. Low drone shot. Kevin on the helm: We know we have two groups of boats. One going south in front of the front. Three of us who have gybed. Now we know that the ones who stayed in front of the front are doing better than us. Now we're working hard. We took this position; we'll see. Pascal and Stu argue about effects of current if they bear away or not. Marie and Kevin talking. Horace: Last night was a bad dream. We almost stopped in the ocean. He looks up at the main. "More mainsheet?" Kevin driving. Stu: I find there's nothing productive in getting upset about stuff you can't control. For example, the other guys who are cruising off, with a nice breeze, there's nothing we can do about that at the moment. The best we can do is to sail well with the wind we have. As long as we're doing well with the boats around us, that's all we can do. Might end up a day behind, but it won't be through lack of trying. Marie talks in French. Nav station: Pascal looks at routing. Closeup of a winch grinding. Another boat a few miles away ahead and to leeward: Looks like TTToP (yup; tracker confirms). HIgh drone shot.Parade. Dockout. Annalise waves. Bleddyn: Pretty exciting leaving Newport. Can't wait to get home. Gonna be exciting. Start. Scallywag below them. Gulls (Great Black-backed Gulls?) Close action upwind. AkzoNobel crosses them. The close tack with Vestas. I think they were always clear astern. Nerves of steel, that Dee. Going under the bridge. Dee on the helm. Going into the fog with Scallywag ahead. Slomo bow work. Dropping the J1 in spray on the bow. Martin does something at the clew. Bernardo, below: Start worked pretty well. A nice beat. Made a mistake on the top mark, delaying the tack too much and we had a penalty, which took us to the back of the fleet. And it was hard to recover. Still in contact; keep our heads up, move forward. Hopefully we can catch up with the fleet. Liz: We're completely lost in the fog; we have no idea where we are. Brian, at the nav station: It's a complete mystery. We're in the Bermuda Triangle. Sailing in the fog. Brian: Cold front behind us. Can choose to stay with the wind ahead of the front, but eventually that wind will die out. It's a balance between taking the light air earlier to get the new wind earlier. Watching how it develops. That's north vs. south in the routing.Cockpit, Slomo washing machine. Below, Charlie and Mark talk about how they went to Brown U., but they only slightly overlapped (Charlie was older). We lived in the same house, but not at the same time. Mark: We were both far too big to be sailing small boats. Charlie talks about doing poorly at nationals. Mark talks about going to the unveiling of a new sailing center. Mark talks about pollution in the Providence River. "I would never eat shellfish from the Providence River... That's all the questions." SiFi on the helm. SiFi below: In our third day of sailing through the tradewinds. And then all the action in this leg is going to happen at the end. Going to get lifted and have to pick our moment to gybe out of the high pressure. Main competition is further west. They have better pressure, but we might get the shift first. Can hopefully come out ahead of Dongfeng and maybe Brunel. He shows the computer screen with the competitors on it, and follows the routing north to where they're going to need to gybe near Bermuda. Slomo shot of the weather rudder, the stern with the US flag and horizon.Sunrise shot of the stern. Below, Witty and Libby are at the nav station. Libby: "As much as we had the cloud of doom three or four days ago, in hindsight it probably turns out to be a bit of a blessing in disguise. Because it gave us a more westerly approach to the following clouds; it gave us this lane." Grant sits next to her, holds up three fingers: "Only three Sidney-Hobart races to go to the finish." On deck, Luke steers with the sunrise behind him. "Every sched that they don't gain it makes it harder for them to catch us... It's all up to everyone on board now to execute as a group." Below, Trystan eats with Luke behind him also eating. Trystan talks about how they can't relax, because everyone is so quick behind, still a lot of choices to be made. Grant, on the helm: "Cha-ching!" He explains that Witty (standing behind him) has a deal where when they can hit 20 knots of boatspeed on course, they get a payout, $100. "Problem is the steering's a little too accurate lately, it's gonna cost him a fortune." Witty talks about how they've had emails from supporters and sponsors, and expectations are super high. Talks about the level of stress with 1,400 miles to go. Not wanting to let down the people who put them there.Sunrise. Vestas sails toward a raincloud. Nick, trimming the headsail: "We are coming into a cloud line; the morning rollcall of clouds." He points back to where AkzoNobel and Dongfeng have been closing in on them. Radar screen showing clouds, and with what I assume are the AIS positions of two boats to their southwest, 2 and 4 miles away, respectively. Shot of AkzoNobel and Dongfeng a few miles away. Nick and someone (Tom?) in the cockpit in the rain. At the nav station, Mark talks about how they're stuck in a cloud with no wind, while AkzoNobel, a mile away, is doing 11 knots. "Pretty annoying. Build up a nice lead on them overnight, and it's evaporating very quickly... Let's go." Shot of Akzo in the rain. Shot of routing software. Drone shot of Vestas bouncing with no wind in leftover chop. Someone on the foredeck. Shot of the mainsail looking up, with Stacey standing next to it. SiFi at the nav station, looking at what I think must be the 2018.01.12 01:00 UTC sched, in which MAPFRE had surged north well to the west of them. "Wow." He eats. Amory: "Brutal." SiFi, as he eats: "They probably got in the western edge of this. But they're only in 3 knots [of wind]. So they've gotta deal with the wake [?] as well. The hope is that we break out of this first." SiFi comes up on deck: "Yeah. As scary as we thought it would be." Tony: "Those guys sailed around?" SiFi: "They're due west of us, about 26 miles. They're only in 3 knots, but they are in an easterly." They peel to the MH0. Hannah sits on the lowered J1, tying it with sail ties. "Just put themasthead back up, and got breeze from closer to the direction we're looking for." SiFi: "Pretty painful morning. A cloud moved through last night and decimated the wind field... Filling in now. Got 8 knots of breeze from 060. And it's northeasternly, which is the future. And actually it's gonna continue lifting." As the wind builds we see them unfurling the J3 to double-head with the MH0. Wake shot with them moving at 10 knots.High drone shot of Vestas on a blue ocean with very little wind. AkzoNobel is visible a few miles away to windward. Mark, on the wheel, points to three boats to weather. We see a shot of them; left to right: AkzoNobel, Dongfeng, MAPFRE. Phil and Hannah lie in the shade of the main. Phil: "It's probably a really nice comfortable 50 degrees downstairs, and about 47.8 out on deck. Sea temperature of 32 degrees, so it's just a pleasure." Nick and Mark in the cockpit look to weather, talk about the other boats getting the wind first. Sam, to Nick: "What do you know, chief?" (On the helm, Mark bangs the wheel.) Nick: "Um. Mark's scaring me." Below, TJ talks about how hot it is and points out blisters forming behind the paint/surface coating (?) on the starboard side due to the sun. Talks about needing to drink another bottle of water. We see a shot of a pad in the foreward sail locker where someone has been sleeping, drenched in sweat. On deck, Stacey sits near the mast in an eerie silence. "We're barely moving and we've got four other boats all within eyeshot of each other." TJ looks through binoculars at AkzoNobel, describing what sails they have up: "They're not furled because their zigzags are lining up with the jib. So it's the J1 or the Code 0." They joke about the routing, it taking 3,000 years to reach their destination. Tony, from the wheel, calls out, "If we're out here for 3,000 years we'll have a few typhoons to deal with." SiFi walks forward, talks about the GPS mark time being 1,360 days. Nick: "That's Instagrammable."Simon, at the nav station, looks at routing software and a sched (I think?). He talks about hopefully making gains, or at least holding even. "I"m just hoping we gained, or at least held them. Were getting lifted now, so it'd be nice for them to get lifted as well." He looks at the sched. "One longer, two higher." Charlie looks over his shoulder. They discuss the update. Charlie: "And relative to the last sched they must have been fucking 10 higher." Charlie: "C'mon. Difference in distance to finish 2 miles?" SiFi: "Good for the fans at home." They talk about getting lifted compared to the model; when to gybe. Charlie: "Nice to know we're a bit longer, a little faster... We'll run out of pressure before them. It's nice to be so close to Dongfeng, but that's a little inflated... Still fighting to the end, especially with double points." SiFi explains that they were talking about Brunel. "Next 24 hours is all about keeping the yellow boat behind us, and catching the red one."Charles, at the nav station, looking bummed as he looks at routing software. He says it isn't good news; Vestas has passed them and they have not that much wind. (Though looking at the tracker now, I'm not sure Vestas is actually going to get ahead of them.) But they have to gybe, while Dongfeng can go straight to the mark. So he thinks Dongfeng can stay ahead. Not fair, because they are so far apart they have to do different routings, and the routing was poor for them and better for Vestas. Also the keel problem has cost them some key miles; he hopes that isn't the difference between second and third place.Ben does a radio [?] voice: "...Scallywag, 5483, bound for Melbourne." Tom sits at the nav station with António behind him looking at routing software. Tom: "My life consists of 3 hours on, 3 hours off. 3 hours on. 3 hours off. I don't even know what time it is. I don't even know if it's morning or night. It all looks the same down here. [To António] What time is it?" António: "8:30... In the morning." Tom: "We've been in sunlight now for 9 hours. It's 8:30 in the morning. Go figure." Parko sits on the gally, picking through a bag of some sort of food, picking out his favorite bits and eating them. Talks to Alex, who's getting his foulies on. Parko: "Mom must be angry." Alex: "Mom, don't tell me what to do!" Parko: "But mom, I'm in the middle of the ocean." Parko: "I'm going on watch. A bit delirious. I probably should have slept, but I didn't. So I've got a lot of sugar and some coffee and I'll be good. We need to turn left. [laughs] We're going across Free-o [Freemantle?] and the Australian Bight. But there's two big ridges in the way. Once we're across them we'll be all right. But there's a big stop sign in the middle. Highway 1 is about to shut down." Alex reads the label of his protein bars. "Times two. Lunch." Parko: "I think morale's starting to pick up a bit. Everyone's dried out. Fresh pair of [something], fresh pair of socks; everyone's starting to smell a bit better too... We just don't want to have to gybe around the finish and start again. Want time for a little snooze." Alex, with talcum powder [?] on his hands, jokes with Annemieke. Alex: "Hey, Bessie. High five!" They slap hands and a cloud of powder fills the air. They laugh. Fish talks about how they're halfway, forecast is quite nice, sun's out and it's a bit drier, and everyone's happier. "And the kettle's just boiled; perfect." Ben puts food cubes in the mug in preparation for the hot-water treatment. Annemieke: "We're just enjoying what we're doing. It's not always ideal; we're all wet. But we're all happy. And we just found out that we're getting pretty late into Melbourne; the forecast has lightened down. So not that much time for preparation for Hong Kong."Southern Ocean waves. Slomo waves. Crew on stern as Vestas sails downwind in large seas. SiFi, below, describes what an ice gate is. Shot of the computer screen showing routing software and their track bumping up to the ice gate. Charlie, below: "It would be nice to have a little bit more freedom. And we wouldn't actually have to do this. But because we do we've gotten pretty good at." Explains that it takes about 40 minutes to gybe due to stacking. Talks about how many times they have to do it. SiFi talks about sailing along the edge of the exclusion zone with all the gybing. SiFi getting dressed. "It's quite nice on deck. Gearing up's a little inconvenient." Shots of crew on deck. Grinding, Stacking. Charlie steering. Jena, below: "I hope we don't see any icebergs." Chuny, below: "Safety first." On the stern (trimming the mainsheet, I think), Tony points out where the ice gates are, 60 miles away. Sam: "Who builds these gates?" Tony: "I don't know. Maybe they've got a deal with Trump. An imaginary fencing company. I wonder how high it is. Twenty-one feet?" Tom (I think?) says it could be like The Truman Show. The clouds coult be painted. Stacey and Tom join in. Jena: "We're actually in a big pool of water, and they're just moving the water underneath us. And we're not going anywhere." Tony: "We're actually in a room with a green screen behind us, and they're throwing buckets of water on us." Epic surfing shot from astern. Slomo washing machine.SiFi sits at the nav station looking at a routing screen on the computer. His breath is visibly fogging due to the cold. "It looks like we're walking the line between speed and safety reasonably well." Slomo of his breath fogging. With low sun behind them as they stand on the stern, Charlie and SiFi talk about a problem with the main. "There's so much friction on it on the spreaders and shit it's probably not going anywhere." Nick talks about a couple of squall lines came through, up to 45 knots. And going onto the third reef the headboard of the mainsail isn't going onto lock. Mark: "Well, we've got 44 knots, and if you look this way there's a massive cloud, and the water's more white than blue." Charlie jokes about not saying "white squall". Slomo. Sam to Mark: "How is it being down here?" Mark: "It's everything you'd expect. Windy, cold, we've got 48 knots right now. Look upwind. It's crazy. Doing 30 knots of boatspeed. It's pretty crazy, but somehow everything's still in control." Slomo wake.Drone shots of TTToP sailing on port gybe, triple-heading with the MH0 (I think?) in about 15 knots of wind. Later, the drone looks down from above, and the J2 has been furled. Below, Nicolas sits at the nav station looking at routing software. We see him by the wheel, explaining to Liz, who's steering. Liz looks over the side at the area of the rudder. Someone (Elodie?) grinds. Wake through wide-angle lens. Wide-angle shot from behind as Lucas steers, surfing. He turns around briefly, taking both hands off the wheel to make dual shaka signs and stick his tongue out. Francesca, trimming the main, chuckles. They surf in increased wind. Bleddyn coils in the pit. A wave douses the pit. Later, it's almost dark, we see out from the cabin hatch as water washes into the cockpit.Nicolai, on deck in his neoprene cowl in fairly light air, talks about how they're the most southern boat right now, and have just gybed. Fleet split into two groups; they're wth MAPFRE and Dongfeng. Below, Martine (in cornrows) bails out water. Jules and Nicho, at the nav station, look at routing software. Jules talks about being a bit disappointed in the latest sched, vs. MAPFRE and Dongfeng, Brunel. Nicho: "We coughed it up there last night." Separately, Nicho talks about how each of the boats separated; probably due to breeze. Shot of Simeon on the helm, scowling in his cold-weather cowl. Álex, in the cockpit, talks about how we are here, in the Southern Ocean, but it isn't normal conditions. "Like a pit stop before the next depression comes, with 35, 40 knots, straight to Melbourne." Nicolai talks about how variable the Southern Ocean is. "It's like a spring day in Denmark up north. So I'm enjoying it."Blair grinds the middle pedestal. Sophie on the mainsheet: "Hold." Xabi talks to her; they both grind. Xabi, to Jen: "It's all going pretty well." Talks about other boats around them: Dongfeng, Vestas, AkzoNobel, Brunel. "Tricky wind; up and down and very shifty." Gybing early morning. Pablo talks in the cockpit about the routing. "Maybe we do... 50 knots?" Sophie: "Fifty? Oh.. my... god.." Xabi on the helm: "We won't do 50." Pablo: "Right now the routing says that." Sophie: "And that's... 20 knots?" Xabi: "Yeah." Xabi, to Jen: "It's looking like real windy, next days... In a couple of days, 40 plus for a couple of hours." Talks about the ice gate. So get rest and food now, for later. Jen: "Any advice for me?" Xabi, smiling: "For you? It's gooa be good. It's gonna be rough (shrugs) and cold. Good fun." Sophie and Pablo convo continues, about how long it's going to be: up to 6 days. Sophie, to Jen, talks about making sure she's organized, has the right gear on, try to rest as much as she can tonight. "Just take it as it comes." Jen: "Any advice for me." Sophie laughs. Blair, from the pedestal: "Hold on." Sophie: "Hold on, Jen. Stay down below if you want to." Blair: "Have a nice stay in your bunk. That's what I'd do if I could." Shot of AkzoNobel on their starboard quarter.Charlie and Simon at the nav station looking at routing (I think?). Charlie is eating. Charlie jokes about how when the wind gets high enough there's no sail in the sail chart. Charlie: "It's just like, good luck. Bare poles?" Simon chuckles, jokes about how you don't bother with some data points: "100 true, 1,000 knots." They talk about apparent wind angle. Simon: "You can reach down; this is where you end up on the ice gate... Then it passes over and you're back to running again." Charlie: "Realistically is the J1 getting hanked on? Probably not." Simon: "No." Simon says J2, probably. "A bit like the Trans-atlantic, probably." Charlie: "It would be pretty tough. 25 knots is when the J2 becomes a realistic outrigger sail." Charlie: "So how are we going to get the A3... We could to the J0 for a little bit. J0/J2, something like that?" Tony, from his bunk: "How much wind you got in that low?" Charlie: "In the center of it?" Tony: "No, in the route." Charlie: "The part that affects us? 37 in the listed result." Tony: "So that's a good chunk into the 40s." Simon: "Yeah." Charlie, lookng at Sam: "We've gone higher." Tony: something I can't understand, like: So when you (something about being on the A3?) you get the (something) down there quick." (?) Simon: No, exactly. Tony: "Actually faster at 25, 23, 20 boat knots of breeze." Simon: "Yeah." That's a lot of experience talking there.Closeups: binnacle compass, hands on the wheel, easing the mainsheet. Marie, trimming the main, talks about the weather being warm, and no birds. It's sad they are too far north, not in the Southern Ocean. "Maybe tomorrow; we will see." Stu, on the helm. "Definitely not the Southern Ocean. We don't wear sunglasses in the Southern Ocean." (He laughs.) "This is far too nice." Black talks about the blue sky and being quiet warm. Wake shot. Below, at the nav station, Pascal talks about strategy with the approaching low, gybing during the night to get the good position, the good pressure. Difficulty of routing with the exclusion zone/ice gate. No way to get away and be safe. Tomorrow night, maybe gusting to 45 knots. Increasing wave state. He shows the routing software with the low moving through.