Justin looks at clouds. Talks about the wind. Simeon on the helm looks tired. Rainbow to leeward. Justin: Basically have been bouncing from cloud to cloud. Playing snakes and ladders with the other boats. Puffs that last for 30 seconds to a minute. Brad on the bow as they hoist the J1 and furl the MH0. Justin on the helm. Rain. Stacking below. Jules looks at the computer. "Until we find some wind out of the westerly quadrant we won't make any gains." Sailing into the doldrums now. Guys behind have all seen them slow and have turned left (east), taking a lot of miles out of them. Luke: Jules and Chris and Simeon have spent a lot of time over the last week deciding where to cross the doldrums. Jules at the mast. Nicolai and Martine lower the MH0 after hoisting the J1. Lowering the J1, Justin gathers it in on the foredeck. Jules emerges from below to annouce the sched: Brunel is closest to the finish now. Brad in the sunset. Justin on the helm after sunset: Dismal couple of days. Who knows what's next.Brunel and a second boat (MAPFRE?) a mile or two away. Light winds. Nicolas explains that they are in a wind transition. Good news is they were able to catch up with Brunel, Dongfeng, and MAPFRE; only a couple of hundred meters away. Now fighting in very light wind. Grinding at night. Stacking below, talking about how bad they smell. Other boat a few hundred yards away with port running lights. Bernardo talks about being on a 2-on, 2-off watch schedule. Phosphorescent wake. Competitor running light close to them. Drone shot of sunrise. Bernardo, Nicolas shave in a handheld mirror. Crew sleepy. Another boat behind them. Nicolas takes a bucket bath on the stern. Francesca talks about the battle during the night. MAPFRE and Dongfeng 35 miles to the west; now they're hanging with Brunel. Pushed hard during the night. All a bit tired, but we want to push as hard as possible. Drone shot of them sailing wiht Brunel ahead and to leeward of them.Carolijn, below, makes and eats a meal. "I'm eating the big boy cereal, specially made by Neal. Lots of granola and nuts and dried fruit." Talks about bad sea state 16/18 hours ago. MAPFRE right next to them. Fun racing. Jérémie eats. "Chinese breakfast... Quick to cook." Talks about being close to MAPFRE, concentrating while driving on being fast. A very close battle. Interesting, but a bit exhausting at times." Charles, at the nav station, talks about MAPFRE. Boats staying together to cross the doldrums. "Lots of boats are following us. Every time we change a bit our heading they change. But today we don't know where to go because we have no forecast... We are using the forecast from the start... Now we have the forecast, and can see we are in a good position."Slomo on deck. Henry gets out of his bunk. Jokes about it being hard to get out of bed. Dee, below, talks about the difficulty of getting back up to speed in rough, upwind conditions. But good to have the energy provided by the crew who've been off for a leg. Lucas talks about it being a bit of a shock going offshore again; takes a while to get back into the rhythm. Bianca talks about struggling to find her sea legs. "But I've always been clumsy." She laughs. Nicolas: "Was good to have a leg off... I was quite tired... Enjoyed a bit my family; we had a baby on Leg 2... As a father I'm quite lucky." Henry: "I don't think I've missed the 3, 4, 5 wakeups a day you have to put up with." Dee: "I hope we did well. I've been driving... We're with the two red boats. And they always say if you're with a red boat you must be doing all right." She crawls into her bunk. Slomo on deck of Henry driving. Slomo spray.Pretty sunrise drone shot. Martin, on the helm, talks about gybing into the Luzon Strait. Brunel should be somewhere around here. Brian [Johnson] and Dee look at the chart. Dee describes how Brunel is super close to them; just off their quarter. Drone shot. Brian talks about the tricky wind patterns ahead of them and the positions of the boats around them. Dee laughs about Brunel being right there, and how she's tired.Very high drone shot. Jules, on the stern, talks about how they're in stealth mode. Most of those on the boat have done 35 out of the last 40 days at sea. Drone shot flying in toward and then past the boat.Nicolai, on deck: "You are going to have good and bad days when you do the Volvo Ocean Race, and you're more likely to have more bad days than good days. Today for example is a bad day; we just lost 4 miles to Dongfeng in a couple of hours, and we don't really have the answers to it. So frustration goes up, people get frustrated, tired, they're exhausted already, and you've gotta be able to deal with that. And that just comes down to good leadership, good management of the team, and everyone getting back into their positing and their roles, and just doing their job, and not trying to get into each other and getting emotional about it... keep the ups and downs away... Tomorrow we might gain for miles... Just flatline the emotional part of it." Below, Simeon talks about Dongfeng being 4 miles ahead. "And the next guys coming on watch are like, what happened?" On deck, Brad looks tense. "It's not like it's the end of the world. Still a week out." Luke, on the wheel: Talks about being happy the rest of the fleet is tucked away. Nicolai talks about having three not-so-good legs, so the pressure is on. Need to deliver results. "You can never regret putting in 100%, and that's what we're doing right now."Slomo shots of the crew working in the cockpit. Washing machine. Nicho comes below, takes his gear off, washes his face in the galley. Nicho: "You see when you take certain medication, 'Don't operate this vehicle when tired and drowsy'? Well, everyone's operating this vehicle tired and drowsy." Talks about getting rest, food, makes for better decisions. Martine comes below, takes off her gear. "For me sleep and food go side by side. The less I sleep the more I have to eat to have energy." Martine eats. Nicolai talks below about the balance between sleeping and eating. Brad: People sacrifice a lot to get a couple of minutes extra sleep. People don't brush their teeth to get a couple more minutes of sleep. Don't want to name names." Martine gets in her bunk. Nico, talks about the upcoming stronger conditions. "Plenty of sleep. Just look at me." He grins.Wake shot with Dongfeng sailing fast. View forward from stern, double-headed as they sail on port gybe. Washing machine. Below, Jack eats something. He looks a bit shell-shocked. Jack: "It's been a very brutal leg so far. It's very demanding conditions; always fast, always wet... I don't think I've gone on deck without the wet weather gear the whole race. Everything's wet. Inside the boat's horrible. There's water everywhere. There's water in your sleeping bag, there's water in your personal bag. There's water everywhere. It's been a really hard leg to sleep; every time you seem to get in your bunk there's a gybe or a sail change... It's been a hard leg. Everyone's feeling the push at the moment, everyone's tired... We're close to the end, conditions are still hard at the moment, but everyone's focused on getting to Australia in one piece and in the best place we can... First time I've sailed into Australia, so it's kind of a treat. A big Southern Ocean leg done, which was an unknown for me." Talks about how a lot of his family witll be in Melbourne for the finish. Hasn't seen some of them in 6 years, so it will be great to catch up with them. Really looking forward to getting in. Shots of water condensing on things in the cabin, water flowing. Marie asleep. Jack putting Sudocrem on his hands, face. "It might look ridiculous." But explains how the cream helps with little cuts and sores from the gaskets and salt water. Black, below, talks about how it's a long day, and a lot of pressure, lack of sleep. "A bit tired, yes." Shots of the cockpit from the cabin, washing machine.Below, Kevin talks about being tired. "With my watch partner Carolijn Brouwer we have been 12 hours on deck - 14, 2 more. Lots of gybes along the ice limit. Now we are getting more pressure, sea state." Now 2 hours of rest before being back on deck, then one very important gybe before heading north for Australia. Carolijn: "I think I have to admit I'm pretty tired now. All the action on deck seems to happen when Kevin and I are off watch. But it's part of the job and you ahve to get it done. It's part of the race." In the Southern Ocean it's harder because of getting dressed and undressed. "When you do that every 2 hours it gets a bit frustrating. In other legs it's much less a problem... There's a lot more layers coming on than otherwise.... Have to push really hard. The guys on MAPFRE have done really well." Fabien talks in French. Black talks about normal life on board. Having to be ready. Eating a lot of food with no rice (?). Pascal talks in French.Below, Pablo talks in Spanish. (Same as the previous video, where he talked in English about keeping their clothes on when off watch because they were going up to gybe every hour.)Wake shot as MAPFRE sails fast with the sun setting behind them. Blair, below in a red light, talks about how it's hard to know when the day started; 12, 24, 36 hours. Gybing every hour if you're on watch; if you're off-watch trying to get down below and get a quick bite to eat, get in your bunk as quick as you can. Louis prepares something to eat in the galley in the light of his headlamp. "Managed to make some pretty good gains on Dongfeng so we're pushing hard." Pablo, standing near the hatch: "Two hours" (until the next gybe). Blair: "Two hours? That can't be right. It's too long!" Támara laughs. Louis asks Jen what's in the food bin behind her. Jen: "Pasta bolognese." Blair hands it out. Later, Jen asks Pablo how he's feeling. "We have just started so at the moment not too bad. We are wet, tired and hungry, all of us. The good thing is it is not that cold anymore. Doing all these aneavers we are quite warm. But there's 18 hours to go, so this is nothing." Talks about hwo it's important to do all these maneuvers to stay close to Dongfeng along the ice limit. Talks about how it's helpful that they're so close by so they can see if they're gaining or losing. Birds astern. Blair talks about getting back in his gear; Willy kids him. Pablo, below, talks about watches. We see footage on deck of a gybe while his audio continues. Have to keep the clothes on because the maneuvers are so frequent. On deck, Xabi talks to Jen with the sunrise behind him: "We've got 20 more of those coming, today and tomorrow. So that's good. Plenty of power here."Slomo shot of waves through the wheel. Interesting slowed-down audio. An albatross flies by. Slomo grinding. Slomo faces; Carolijn on the helm. Slomo trimming. Below, Carolijn takes off her gear. She talks to Martin; behind Fabien is making food in the galley. Carolijn: "Yes, it's painful. Not necessarily painful, it's just tough. It's very tiring. You get to a certain stage where you're so tired that you start tripping over your own feet. If you don't watch out it can be quite dangerous." Talks about even 20 minutes lying down in your bunk, even if you don't sleep, helps you get the energy to make the next gybe. "I've lost count. I don't even know if we're halfway yet. Just in the last 3 hours of my off watch we've done 6 gybes?... Entertaining stuff." Fabien eats with a bit of a 1,000-yard stare. (Looking at the tracker through this section it's been brutal; Dongfeng and MAPFRE are at the front of the fleet within AIS range of each other having a running gybing battle to see who can stay closer to the exclusion zone.) Pascal, below, drops his head and rubs it. Looks tired. We pull back and see he's watching Charles at the nav station from his bunk. Charles talks to Martin: "It's very simple. During 30 hours we're having to gybe every hour so it's a nightmare. Not very funny but we have no choice. We have the ice limit for a good reason... You have to stack every time, 600 kilos each time... You don't manage to sleep... That's life at the extreme for sure. On the positive side, we are ahead with MAPFRE and fighting for the first place, so it's good."Bow cam shot looking aft, with spray, as Scallywag reaches on port in 20 knots of wind. Below, Luke Parkinson, in his bunk, talks about trying to talk to "Halesy", in the nav station, and how just climbing in and out of his bunk is quite a task. Steve, at the nav station, talks about how hard it is to stand without holding onto anything. He talks about how hard it is to function with the boat's motion. We see Tom in the galley, Ben eating. Luke, Ben talk about the effort of living when the boat is heeled, moving, dressing, stacking.Shot of them in the evening sailing past Porto Santo Island on its north side, surfing on starboard gybe. Steve, below at the nav station: "Second night, just to the north of Porto Santo, which is actually the island we rounded in Leg 1 of the race." Slomo shot of them approaching Porto Santo with the sunset behind it. Steve: "Just down to leeward now, well, 20 miles away, is Madeira. Always a bit of a decision which side of these islands you go in the tradewinds, because they leave a huge wake of disturbed wind beneath them. So we're passing over the top here. And also just trying to keep in contact with the fleet. Been a fairly windy first 36 hours of the race, so people are pretty tired. Breeze has calmed down now; just good fast sailing." Slomo shots of cockpit washing machine in deep dusk.Cockpit looking aft as Scallywag surfs. Looks a little less hectic than yesterday. Below, Witty sits, looking tired, as Ben walks forward past him toward the galley. Witty: "Good. Nipper's about to cook me some dinner. And I have a couple of favorite words in the dictionary. One is 'ointment'. That means it's too serious for cream and it needs ointment. And that is gonna be my bum in the next few days if it doesn't dry out. And the second one is 'moist'. That's all I can do to describe the last 24 hours is very moist. Fast, and moist." Washing machine shot of cockpit. Witty: "Dongfeng and MAPFRE are a little west of us, but we're a little detached from everyone else... We're all heading west at the moment. Doesn't really mean a hell of a lot... Twenty-four hours into a marathon. Nobody wins it in the first 24 hours... Either I sleep soon or I die. Pretty simple. I can't do 19 days of this; no one can. But the forecast is we only have a couple more days of this. Just tough it out for a couple of more days and see how we go."