Sunrise drone shot. Francesca: We're still leading, so this is good. Last sched was not the best one. We can see Vestas (gestures behind her). My parents had a cruising boat, 30-foot cruising boat. I was born in January, and in February I was already on the boat. Slomo of Francesca adjusting her cap. "They had this system of bungee that made a little bed for me." Shot of her left forearm tattoos of elephans. Francesca on the helm in slomo. Learned how to manage herself in the hard moments. Had some hard moments in the Southern Ocean. Was more like mentally tough than physically. Push myself, tomorrow will be another day, it will be better. Instruments on the mast. Dee by the shrouds. Dee: To see Frankie grow from the start of this project to now has been incredible. Came in with no offshore experience; had an Olympic background. But she does make you laugh, because sometimes she says yeah, yeah, yeah. But you realize she didn't understand any of it. [We see everyone in the crew saying hello in their native dialect.] Francesca tells a story of Frederico rescuing a flying fish that hit the board. Francesca: An amazing experience to sail around in the environment I love, with the group of friends. Worst thing: the freeze-dried. The food is not really nice at times. Sunset drone shot.Stacey at the mast. Rain squall behind them. TJ bagging up the J1. Stacking forward. "Ready, two, six!" Deploying the MH0. Stacey working in the pit. She laughs: I was just thinking how different this evening is from any evening on the last leg. Sun hats and tee shirts, no one is complaining about anything weather-related. Even when it does rain it's short-lived. Quite warm inside the boat. In the Southern Ocean it's constant condensation dripping down below. Nick and Tony in the galley. TJ grinds. Wake. TJ on the helm. "Where'd the hat come from? Australia. I asked my dad what's the best hat to buy. Akubra." He talks about the hat, about sun protection.Whole video is a single web-cam shot of Bouwe doing an interview in English with a French-accented (I think?) journalist. Bouwe talks about the remainder of the leg, the pitfalls, match racing wth Dongfeng to the finish, how winning this leg would change the whole complexion of the scoreboard for them, and how the difficulty of this leg compares with his previous 7 Volvos. But the wind going aft and staying strong through virtually the entire leg means it's over that much sooner.Someone off camera: Vestas got dismasted. Peter: Have they? That's not good... Conditions definitely aren't as bad as they have been. MAPFRE stopped; we don't know why they stopped in Cape Horn... We've obviously had a fair few issues on board... Good to hear they're all safe. But terribly bad luck.Nicho, below, talks about the loss of John Fisher. A good man. Deeply affected; offer our thoughts to his family and friends. Slomo on deck; albatrosses flying past Southen Ocean waves. Nicho: From their own boat's point of view, has been full-on Southern Ocean conditions. Coldest one he can remember in quite a while. Has given them a bit of a beating. The place is beautiful and ferocious at the same time. "I'll be glad to get out of here."Spreader cam view as Vestas surfs. Washing machine shots, slomo washing machine. Phil, below: Cape Horn's a big day in any sailor's life. This is going to be the fourth time I'm around it. Last time with Abu Dhabi, Chuy Bermudez was on the radio with the lighthouse keeper, and apparenlty it's voluntary thing for 12 months. He'd been there with his wife and kids for nearly a year. Slomo in the cockpit. Hannah, below, talks about Cape Horn. She had no idea how tough it was going to be. So windy, waves like nothing she's ever seen before, non-stop. Surfing shots on deck, grinding. SiFi, below: One of the toughest Southern Ocean legs I've ever done. Relentlessness of it, constant high winds, cold, snow. People have been doing a great job to battle on. Reaching the Horn will be a good moment to celebrate and reflect on the leg so far. Slomo washing machine in the cockpit.Fast wake shot. View forward as they stuff the bow. Fast surfing shot looking aft at massive waves. More shots of epic big-wave surfing. Brian, in the companionway: "I've got my skis, poles, boots; I'm just gonna go out now. Snows up. Should be perfect powder. Southern Ocean... I'm gonna go enjoy it." Slomo of stern as snow falls. Spreader cam view of washing machine in the cockpit. Dee and Brian at the nav station talking strategy. Brian jokes about the motion: "Hang on in the underground train." He explains to Sam: They're less than 2 days from Cape Horn. Have to do 2 more gybes to get to Cape Horn. Critical to get the timing of the gybes right. Very shifty winds, both direction and speed. Are in a good position in the fleet; need to get to Cape Horn in good position. Not time to go crazy and break the boat trying to get first to Cape Horn, because Brunel's going to be first to Cape Horn.Drone shots of AkzoNobel surfing fast in big wind, triple-heading.Drone shots of AkzoNobel surfing big waves in the sun. Slomo of wake peaking up into a geyser of whitewater. Nicho on the helm as they surf fast in big wind. Wake shot with big waves overtaking. Slomo of stuffing the bow and whitewater coming aft over the cockpit; Justin ducks. Slomo big-wave shots. Slomo of crew stacking aft. Nicolai on the helm with big waves behind him.Epic drone shots of Brunel surfing on starboard gybe while a bird (a petrel, maybe, rather than an albatross? looks a little small for an albatross) checks out the drone. Same configuration as in the previous Brunel-surfing-big-waves drone shots: Deeply reefed (triple-reefed?) main, and then the FR0 and the J3, each sheeted to an outrigger. Makes sense to reduce the sail area of the main for these conditions. More control = faster when the issue is control, not sail area.Crew below engaged in various tasks. Pascal gears up to go on deck. Carolijn goes on deck. Slomo of albatross and epic big waves astern. Washing machine. View from the cabin of the cockpit as they gybe from port to starboard. Carolijn: "Have to tweak her down a bit. Can I use this winch?" Below, Kevin works on a winch drum. Jack eats. Pascal pulls on boots.Kyle, on deck, says there's a squall coming so they've just put a reef in. "Probably got some snow on the way." Angry clouds. Snow on the main. Nina explains that it snowed; she and Kyle joke. Nina: "Kyle's decided this isn't where you should be." Kyle: "It's a place for seals, and whales, and penguins. And not for us." Nina: "It's too cold." Bouwe eating below. He explains the tactical situation. 1500 miles to the Horn. They're in the lead, which is the good news. Big front coming from behind. Gybe for the ice gate. And then big breeze tomorrow. "I think we can be pretty happy, eh?" We see a handoff on the helm: Thomas to Alberto. Below, Bouwe explains that they have 5 drivers: Albi (Alberto), Kyle, Peter, Thomas, and myself. Peter, below, explains that there's a lot of steering required in the Southern Ocean. A lot of load. On the swells. If you've had a peel, your arms are pretty sore after an hour or so. Can't drive that long. Drone shot. Thomas: Objective is to keep a good average speed. What is most complicated is when you surf a big wave you hit the wave ahead of you and slow down a lot. Peter: "You nosedive on every wave to a certain degree. Had some good ones where they went from mid-30s to 12 or so; had no way to get off the wave without broaching, so you just kind of planted it at the bottom. Held on. Not the nicest. But it's all part of it." Epic drone shot from alongside as they nosedive off a big wave and slow down.Drone shots of AkzoNobel surfing big waves in the sun. On deck with Nicho on the helm, we see a squall coming. Nicolai: We've got a bit of hail coming. In a squall usually it's rain, but in the Southern Ocean it's hail. Hurts when it hits you in the head. Slomo shots of hail/snow. Martine (I think?) shakes her hands. "My hands are freezing. It hurts." Nicolai talks about easing the sheet, keeping the wind at 75 apparent. More drone shots of them surfing. Below, Martine squeezes water from her pigtails. "For a Brazilian this is very cold. I've never sialed in this cold before. I was freezing my hands outside. It was pretty cool; we had a pretty cool watch." Nicho, below, talks about gaining bearing. How it's funny that if they sail fast it's safer. If you have a breakage and slow down it's more dangerous, as they found in leg 3. [Favoriting for the epic drone shots and squall/snow.]Drone shots of AkzoNobel surfing big waves in the sun. On deck with Nicho on the helm, we see a squall coming. Nicolai: We've got a bit of hail coming. In a squall usually it's rain, but in the Southern Ocean it's hail. Hurts when it hits you in the head. Slomo shots of hail/snow. Martine (I think?) shakes her hands. "My hands are freezing. It hurts." Nicolai talks about easing the sheet, keeping the wind at 75 apparent. More drone shots of them surfing. Below, Martine squeezes water from her pigtails. "For a Brazilian this is very cold. I've never sialed in this cold before. I was freezing my hands outside. It was pretty cool; we had a pretty cool watch." Nicho, below, talks about gaining bearing. How it's funny that if they sail fast it's safer. If you have a breakage and slow down it's more dangerous, as they found in leg 3. [Favoriting for the epic drone shots and squall/snow.]Spreader cam view of AkzoNobel surfing and stuffing the bow. Below, Simeon recaps the last 48 hours; busy, gybing, changing sails. 2000 miles to Cape Horn. Point Nemo. Brad: Talks about Point Nemo and the space station. Simeon: What to ask the astronaughts on the space station? Emily wonders if it's easier to go to the toilet on the space station than it is on a Volvo boat. Luke: Jealous. Their stacking technique must be far superior to ours. Simeon: what they have for dinner. Nicolas: They go to the toilet like we do, they eat freeze-dried like we do, they don't sleep much, have a pretty cool view. So I pretty much see myself as an astronaut these days. Simeon: Must be a pretty impressive view. We have an impressive view of the ocean, and of the stars when the clouds let them through. But their view must be even better. Stern cam view of Martine on the pedestal as they surf.Charles, at nav station: In 30 hours we'll enter very strong conditions. Can't carry the fractional in those conditions, so will need to work out good sail combination. Goal is not to break the boat. A very tough leg. Strong wind, and full downwind with many gybes. I do have stress of course. Because you have the responsibility of the people and the boat. But you still want to fight for the first place. It's a balance between speed and safety. When we have 40 knots we know what sail to use. But then we have a gust to 55, and we have to react. But that's part of the Volvo Ocean Race. Horace talks below in Mandarin. Pascal, at nav station, talks in French while demonstrating something involving chart/routing software.Spreader cam view of AkzoNobel surfing and stuffing the bow. Below, Simeon recaps the last 48 hours; busy, gybing, changing sails. 2000 miles to Cape Horn. Point Nemo. Brad: Talks about Point Nemo and the space station. Simeon: What to ask the astronaughts on the space station? Emily wonders if it's easier to go to the toilet on the space station than it is on a Volvo boat. Luke: Jealous. Their stacking technique must be far superior to ours. Simeon: what they have for dinner. Nicolas: They go to the toilet like we do, they eat freeze-dried like we do, they don't sleep much, have a pretty cool view. So I pretty much see myself as an astronaut these days. Simeon: Must be a pretty impressive view. We have an impressive view of the ocean, and of the stars when the clouds let them through. But their view must be even better. Stern cam view of Martine on the pedestal as they surf.Charles, at nav station: In 30 hours we'll enter very strong conditions. Can't carry the fractional in those conditions, so will need to work out good sail combination. Goal is not to break the boat. A very tough leg. Strong wind, and full downwind with many gybes. I do have stress of course. Because you have the responsibility of the people and the boat. But you still want to fight for the first place. It's a balance between speed and safety. When we have 40 knots we know what sail to use. But then we have a gust to 55, and we have to react. But that's part of the Volvo Ocean Race. Horace talks below in Mandarin. Pascal, at nav station, talks in French while demonstrating something involving chart/routing software.Crew gets gear on below. Lucas: Out there it's pretty wild at the moment. 30-35 knots of wind; boat's doing 30-35 knots down the waves. Half the time you're not really in control. Just hanging on for dear life. But it's fun. Brian, getting dressed: Pretty spectacular downwind sailing. We're going to be sailing downwind for the next 2000 miles to Cape Horn. Pretty spectacular. Brian: Few things less fun than pulling off wet foul weather gear... Once they get on deck it gets a whole lot better. But the act of getting on the gear is not fun. Bianca: My hands are sore. My neck is sore... She gets her gear on. Lucas talks about how getting your kit on to go on deck is at least a half-hour operation. Like trying to get dressed standing on the back of a flatbed truck going 100kph down a bumpy road. Smallest moves become nearly impossible. Bianca: Pretty bumpy, pretty wet, pretty windy. But this is what we love doing. So it's pretty awesome to get up on deck for another 4 hours.Nina gets dressed below, then works the foredeck, the pit. Below, she talks about how she and Kyle haven't had much chance to rest, because they keep gybing in the off-watch. Thinks the next gybe will come during their off-watch. Stern cam footage of them surfing on starboard in big winds. We see a gybe in big winds. Nina, below: "It's super windy and the swells quite big. I think I'm getting my first taste of what the Volvo Ocean Race is really like. It's pretty tough." Washing machine from the stern cam. Nina: "Yeah, I did enjoy it. The waves are crazy, and the boys are just fearless when they're steering. And all you can do is just hold on with the mainsheet at the back of the boat; hold on for dear life. It's quite a ride. I'm enjoying it, but it's really hard." Slomo washing machine.Big waves. Marie and Jeremie getting dressed below. Jeremie talks about this storm being smalled compared to what they'll have in a few days. This is 30-40 knots, still sailing with the fractional, sea is quite rough. A bit intense. Not always sure how we're going to finish. Have to be in one piece. Marie talks about having her helmet. Shots of crew in the cockpit. Washing machine, maneuver. Kevin (I think) goes forward to the mast. Freaks me out to see him unclipped. Stern cam shot of 6 crew grinding (gybe?). Crewmember on the aft pedestal dabs. Wake.Stern cam shot of stuffing the bow wiht major washing machine. Crew below. Nicolai: Talks about how wet things are below, and how the boat is like a roller coaster dropping off 20 and 30-foot waves. Surfing shots on deck. Crew comes below dripping. Brad, below: Waves are inconsisent. 38 knots down to 15 knots in a couple of seconds. Pretty tough life on board. Luke, below, dripping: Just passing Vestas. Again. Very wet and cold on deck. Prepping hot drink in the galley. Nicolai, getting dressed: Everything is wet. Wet for a week. I'm tired of being wet. I want to be dry. More stern cam washing machine shots of Nicolai on the pedestal betting doused.Nina gets dressed below, then works the foredeck, the pit. Below, she talks about how she and Kyle haven't had much chance to rest, because they keep gybing in the off-watch. Thinks the next gybe will come during their off-watch. Stern cam footage of them surfing on starboard in big winds. We see a gybe in big winds. Nina, below: "It's super windy and the swells quite big. I think I'm getting my first taste of what the Volvo Ocean Race is really like. It's pretty tough." Washing machine from the stern cam. Nina: "Yeah, I did enjoy it. The waves are crazy, and the boys are just fearless when they're steering. And all you can do is just hold on with the mainsheet at the back of the boat; hold on for dear life. It's quite a ride. I'm enjoying it, but it's really hard." Slomo washing machine.Big waves. Marie and Jeremie getting dressed below. Jeremie talks about this storm being smalled compared to what they'll have in a few days. This is 30-40 knots, still sailing with the fractional, sea is quite rough. A bit intense. Not always sure how we're going to finish. Have to be in one piece. Marie talks about having her helmet. Shots of crew in the cockpit. Washing machine, maneuver. Kevin (I think) goes forward to the mast. Freaks me out to see him unclipped. Stern cam shot of 6 crew grinding (gybe?). Crewmember on the aft pedestal dabs. Wake.Stern cam shot of stuffing the bow wiht major washing machine. Crew below. Nicolai: Talks about how wet things are below, and how the boat is like a roller coaster dropping off 20 and 30-foot waves. Surfing shots on deck. Crew comes below dripping. Brad, below: Waves are inconsisent. 38 knots down to 15 knots in a couple of seconds. Pretty tough life on board. Luke, below, dripping: Just passing Vestas. Again. Very wet and cold on deck. Prepping hot drink in the galley. Nicolai, getting dressed: Everything is wet. Wet for a week. I'm tired of being wet. I want to be dry. More stern cam washing machine shots of Nicolai on the pedestal betting doused.Nina gets dressed below, then works the foredeck, the pit. Below, she talks about how she and Kyle haven't had much chance to rest, because they keep gybing in the off-watch. Thinks the next gybe will come during their off-watch. Stern cam footage of them surfing on starboard in big winds. We see a gybe in big winds. Nina, below: "It's super windy and the swells quite big. I think I'm getting my first taste of what the Volvo Ocean Race is really like. It's pretty tough." Washing machine from the stern cam. Nina: "Yeah, I did enjoy it. The waves are crazy, and the boys are just fearless when they're steering. And all you can do is just hold on with the mainsheet at the back of the boat; hold on for dear life. It's quite a ride. I'm enjoying it, but it's really hard." Slomo washing machine.Big waves. Marie and Jeremie getting dressed below. Jeremie talks about this storm being smalled compared to what they'll have in a few days. This is 30-40 knots, still sailing with the fractional, sea is quite rough. A bit intense. Not always sure how we're going to finish. Have to be in one piece. Marie talks about having her helmet. Shots of crew in the cockpit. Washing machine, maneuver. Kevin (I think) goes forward to the mast. Freaks me out to see him unclipped. Stern cam shot of 6 crew grinding (gybe?). Crewmember on the aft pedestal dabs. Wake.Stern cam shot of stuffing the bow wiht major washing machine. Crew below. Nicolai: Talks about how wet things are below, and how the boat is like a roller coaster dropping off 20 and 30-foot waves. Surfing shots on deck. Crew comes below dripping. Brad, below: Waves are inconsisent. 38 knots down to 15 knots in a couple of seconds. Pretty tough life on board. Luke, below, dripping: Just passing Vestas. Again. Very wet and cold on deck. Prepping hot drink in the galley. Nicolai, getting dressed: Everything is wet. Wet for a week. I'm tired of being wet. I want to be dry. More stern cam washing machine shots of Nicolai on the pedestal betting doused.Night-vision shot in the cockpit looking aft. Bow-cam view at night; someone is hauling the tack of a new sail forward. Mast cam view of the foredeck crew getting buried in a wave. I see Kevin; not sure who the second person is. Cockpit crew grinding. Jack, below, talks about the cold conditions. The air is heavier, so the wind is "windier". And you're a long way from anywhere if things go wrong. Much more dangerous. Really for the driver to take as little away as possible. Doing the work on the foredeck as quickly as possible, but you want to be safe. Hurt my arm a couple of days ago. Had my arm on the forestay, and got lifted horizontal by a wave. Have to be very wary. More nighttime foredeck work. Favoriting for the epic foredeck shots.Dongfeng sails fast on port gybe in the sun. Carolijn: Champagne sailing in the Southern Ocean. Will look different tomorrow. Charles describes a maneuver they're going to perform. Then we see them performing it (looks like a headsail configuratio change). Crashcam footage of... something. They continue working on things. Below, Charles talks in French. Horace gets his gear on, then talks to the camera in Mandarin (I assume). Horace goes on deck. Washing machine in the sunset. Albatross flying on their starboard quarter.Nicho, below in semi-darkness: Right now just coming into all that breeze and grief, probably not the smartest thing you could ever do. Slomo spray. Nicolai, trimming, talks about how this is the sailing you do the race for. The cold is not that bad. The breeze is a different story. Justin, on the aft pedestal: We're in the middle of a good old-fanshioned boat race. Pretty much all the boats lined up on an easterly line. (He runs through the list of nearby competitors.) Four or five days of gybing coming up in breeze, so that's going to sort out positions pretty quickly. Somebody's gonna have one. Not our turn. Not our turn. Nicho, below: At the end of the day it's just so difficult to get across unscathed, without something happening. That's certainly our aim here. But it's a big ask, with at least a week in 30, 40 knots in the Southern Ocean. It's just a massive, massive effort.Joan talks about being at 52°S, near the ice gate. Can see a few boats; Dongfeng by them, and on their windward side Vestas. Will get the first front passing, and lows, and winds about 35-40 knots. Anticipate a few maneuvers to keep near the ice gate. When the wind increases being close to the ice limit will not be as important, with winds even north to south. Tamara, below, talks in Spanish. Pablo, below, talks in Spanish. Rob steering on deck, washing machine shots. Night vision shots of people working on the foredeck and in the cockpit as they make a sail change.Kyle works on the clew of the MH0 (leech line?) while Alberto helps him. Alberto: Strange feeling now that the next land will be Cape Horn. Talks about going south; cold, big breeze. Abby, with windswept hair, talks about making the most of the sun and warmth while they can. "After a pretty heinous 24 hours of bouncing around." Kyle, in the dusk: Saying good bye to New Zealand. Going to a very remote part of the world. Compass rose closeup. Crew below getting undressed, workin on something in a headlamp. Abby getting doused in the pit. Slomo washing machine. Crash cam from the stern of Thomas being washed off the aft pedestal. Thomas, below, talks in French.Daryl on the helm takes spray in the face as they sail fast on port gybe. Horace, sitting behind him, talks about the wind is coming. Going fast to get to the south. Fighting with everyone around them. Slomo. Kevin drinks water in slomo. Slomo washing machine. Carolijn spraying and wiping her face below. Getting undressed. Other boat alongside; presumably that's TTToP when Dongfeng passed them. Carolijn and Daryl eating below. Carolijn: Conditions right now actually very nice compared to what's to come. Noticing the water cooling down. Heading straight south at 23 knots. It's very noticeable that the air and water temperature are going down.Nicolai handles a sheet, takes spray. He talks about J0 vs. MH0. Talks about how it's good getting south; he doesn't mind the cold. "Must be close to Dongfeng though?" Slomo spray. Surfing fast with Nicho on the helm. "A week of pretty full on with 30 to 40 knots, maybe gybing along the ice gate. Need a bit of gybing practice anyway I reckon. Be all right this time. I was doing plenty of gybes coming into Auckland with everything up. Won't be doing that bit of drama again, guaranteed. Slomo washing machine. Martine below getting her foulies on, stretches her neck. "It's already pretty wet, and we haven't even got there... It's not going to be easy, but looking forward to the highway that takes us all the way to South America." Slomo of her taking spray. Favorite mainly because of that brief interview with Nicho talking about gybing.Sailing south on port tack at sunrise. Washing machine. Bianca, in the cockpit, cheers they're having entered the Southern Ocean (she thinks). Dee: We're still winning. Enjoy it while we can. We had a great first 48 hours. Now have the fleet breathing down their necks. Sending it into the south. Isn't getting cold yet but it will be. Slomo washing machine cascade from the companionway.Shifting sails to leeward for a tack. Crew working on the foredeck with a hovering helicopter ahead of them. Slomo of Frederico grinding with Brunel and a New Zealand headland in the background. Bianca, below, talks about sailing away from New Zealand. Awesome going into the Southern Ocean again, going around the Horn. Thanks Auckland for the support, spectators, especially her family and friends. Frederico (I think?) in his bunk. Liz, in her bunk, recaps that they've sailed upwind a couple hundred miles from Auckland to East Cape, tacking, peels. Not much sleep; a lot of stacking. Went pretty quick. More slomo with Brunel in the background. Liz: On the southern highway, straight to the ice gate for us. About 48 hours... Way too wired to go to sleep. (She mimes going to sleep.) Bianca spills up spilled rice in the galley. "I want my mum." I haven't exactly found my sea legs yet. Lucas: It's not as bad as the time I spilled shit everywhere. That was a lot worse. Bianca asks Sam, "Were you on that leg? It was a full explosion." Lucas: "Nah; he was on another boat. Getting _ridden_." Lucas, brushing his teeth, talks about lack of sleep: You think everything's funny. You think everything's shit, or you think everything's funny. Bianca: Just let me clean up my shit... in peace. Lucas: She hasn't got to the funny part yet. [They laugh.] They keep talking (with Liz commenting in the background) as we see a drone shot circling TTToP sailing upwind under J0/J3. [Favoriting mostly for Sam's cool slice-of-life on board. Really feels like being part of the crew.]Henry, on the weather rail, talks about the first few hours of the race. He sounds a little seasick. Aft of Sam, Frederico shakes the water off his head with the sunset behind him, talks about how nervous he was this morning. So dangerous, so many obstacles, low pressure, Cape Horn. Now he's more relaxed; they've started. But it's pretty epic. Liz, on the helm: If you want to do the VOR, this is the leg you think of first. Every offshore sailor's dream. Brian: He's done two legs with this crew, and he's seen how much they've approved. They're not newbies down there. Their learning curve has gone up really high. Have enough experience and common sense now to deal with the south. Talks about easing into it; 25 knots upwind now, and when they get to the Southern Ocean won't be blowing dogs off chains straightaway.Henry, on the weather rail, talks about the first few hours of the race. He sounds a little seasick. Aft of Sam, Frederico shakes the water off his head with the sunset behind him, talks about how nervous he was this morning. So dangerous, so many obstacles, low pressure, Cape Horn. Now he's more relaxed; they've started. But it's pretty epic. Liz, on the helm: If you want to do the VOR, this is the leg you think of first. Every offshore sailor's dream. Brian: He's done two legs with this crew, and he's seen how much they've approved. They're not newbies down there. Their learning curve has gone up really high. Have enough experience and common sense now to deal with the south. Talks about easing into it; 25 knots upwind now, and when they get to the Southern Ocean won't be blowing dogs off chains straightaway.Blair asleep. Rob wakes him up. Blair getting up. "Time to go to work." Gets dressed. Puts on sunscreen. Should be straightforward; now they're in the tradewinds. Might need to change to a smaller sail. Can't put too much sunblock on. Do a little grinding, cruising to check front sail trim, trimming, and driving the last hour. Final touch: some zinc. He rummages. "Looking for that for about 10 minutes; it was sitting right there." On deck, grinding. wrestling sails on the foredeck. As he's trimming, he talks about liking all the jobs on deck. Gives a thumbs up. Tradewind sailing's nice, but once you get over the wet and the cold, Southern Ocean is the best. Talks about his good luck charm that he had at the Olympics and the America's Cup. Thought he'd bring it around the world with him. Below, eating, he talks about it having been a good watch. He talks with Joan at the nav station while eating.Below, Kevin talks about being tired. "With my watch partner Carolijn Brouwer we have been 12 hours on deck - 14, 2 more. Lots of gybes along the ice limit. Now we are getting more pressure, sea state." Now 2 hours of rest before being back on deck, then one very important gybe before heading north for Australia. Carolijn: "I think I have to admit I'm pretty tired now. All the action on deck seems to happen when Kevin and I are off watch. But it's part of the job and you ahve to get it done. It's part of the race." In the Southern Ocean it's harder because of getting dressed and undressed. "When you do that every 2 hours it gets a bit frustrating. In other legs it's much less a problem... There's a lot more layers coming on than otherwise.... Have to push really hard. The guys on MAPFRE have done really well." Fabien talks in French. Black talks about normal life on board. Having to be ready. Eating a lot of food with no rice (?). Pascal talks in French.Liz is steering as TTToP sails on port gybe with full main in 15 knots of wind. Francesca trims the main. Bianca carries her gear to the stern where she gets dressed (maybe she was using it as a bathroom too?) Liz talks about how they're not THAT isolated, because they have the fleet around them. Also there are a lot of islands in this part of the Southern Ocean, so there is shipping and fishing boats. "It's the next part of the Southern Ocean where you feel really isolated." Frederico talks about isolation not crossing his mind much; too busy sailing the boat. In the companionway, Bleddyn brushes his teeth. Cabin shot of the crew on the stern, Elodie, trimming, calls "Main on." Wisdom tucked into the pit coaming. Below, Bleddyn (?) gets dressed. Slomo closeup of Bianca bundled up on deck. Slomo closeups of Nicolas, Francesca (who laughs), Dee, Lucas, Martin. Drone shot from close to the port quarter as TTToP triple-heads on port gybe. More cool drone shots with low sun behind them. Interesting that I think Jérémie managed to get everyone in the crew (other than himself) in this video.Epic slomo shot of a big Southern Ocean wave. Nicho, below, eating: "Batten fouled again and another repair again. Getting there. Main's back up, so it's not slowing us down any." Justin, below, repairs a batten. "This is Frankenbatten. It's now got four different battens in it." He shows his work: The batten with multiple clamps holding the pieces together while glue cures. "We're obviously trying to be tidy Kiwis who use as much [something] as we can, 5200." There are clamps made from vice grips, from channel lock pliers with a big rubber band around the handle squeezing it closed, and a high-tech looking black clamp. Don't tell the media guy, but I've raided his camera box and found a clamp. Which I'm sure he's going to work out when it gets back that it's been used for some sort of repair." Nicho: "We don't mind doing all these running repairs all the time as long as we can go at pretty much full pace. But it wears everyone out. I don't think Brad has had a full off watch for a long time now. [To Brad.] When was your last full off watch?" Brad (sitting near the galley, pulling off bits of tape): "Can't remember my last full off watch." Brad, to James: "Haven't seen land for over a week now. As far away from anything as you can possibly be, more or less. It's not too bad. It's actually quite cool. Really good breeze, good waves. Good sailing." Martine coils lines in the pit, gets washed over by a wave. Below, she talks to Konrad: "Southern Ocean has been pretty cool, going downwind, in these big waves, sailing during the night with big seas. Cold weather as well. Everythying is dripping on the boat, but sailing has been pretty good, besides our breakdown. As long as we have all the sails up, it's all good." Nicho: "You have moments when you wonder what you're doing down here. Other moments quite in awe of the natural bueauty and harshness of the place... How vulnerable you are down here on a little carbon shell in the middle of nowhere. You want the leg to be over, but also how special it is to be here." Slomo of Nicho on the helm, albatross flying by. [Side note: Again, no Simeon. I'm increasingly of the view that Nicho is actually functionally skipper at this point.]Sophie, below, stands close to the companionway. She is turning her head under a blast of air associated with the running engine, maybe? "I just found my hair dryer. It's so good. Ah! Who needs the hairdresser? For the first time getting dry hair. It's getting pretty cold out actually. I'd say the water is 5 degrees or colder. The Southern Ocean's awesome. We are making a lot of miles very quickly. We're going good I think. The albatross are pretty cool. There's like 10 of them following the boat. It's super cool. But it's pretty wet and a little relentless. It's what we expect I guess. It's a little crazy." Intercut with shot of the cockpit, slomo washing machine, albatrosses behind the boat. Nice portrait by Jen of my unproblematic fave.Low-elevation wake shot of Dongfeng's stern, surfing fast. Jack on the helm surfing on port gybe in strong winds with a full main. Caroline, standing between the wheels, explains the situation: Typical of Southern Ocean, where you have a lot of clouds: white, gray, and black. Ahead of them now is a very dark gray cloud, and Pascal from the nav station has confirmed it from radar. So they need to keep an eye on it, in case it comes toward them or they overtake it. So Kevin is now preparing for a reef. Squalls like that can have 10-20 knots more wind. 20-odd knots now, so that would push them into 40s. Want to reef BEFORE the 40 knots, not in it. "It's a fun little game; it keeps us busy." Shots of them sailing into darker skies, triple-heading with a full main. Kevin grinding the forward pedestal.Southern Ocean waves. Slomo waves. Crew on stern as Vestas sails downwind in large seas. SiFi, below, describes what an ice gate is. Shot of the computer screen showing routing software and their track bumping up to the ice gate. Charlie, below: "It would be nice to have a little bit more freedom. And we wouldn't actually have to do this. But because we do we've gotten pretty good at." Explains that it takes about 40 minutes to gybe due to stacking. Talks about how many times they have to do it. SiFi talks about sailing along the edge of the exclusion zone with all the gybing. SiFi getting dressed. "It's quite nice on deck. Gearing up's a little inconvenient." Shots of crew on deck. Grinding, Stacking. Charlie steering. Jena, below: "I hope we don't see any icebergs." Chuny, below: "Safety first." On the stern (trimming the mainsheet, I think), Tony points out where the ice gates are, 60 miles away. Sam: "Who builds these gates?" Tony: "I don't know. Maybe they've got a deal with Trump. An imaginary fencing company. I wonder how high it is. Twenty-one feet?" Tom (I think?) says it could be like The Truman Show. The clouds coult be painted. Stacey and Tom join in. Jena: "We're actually in a big pool of water, and they're just moving the water underneath us. And we're not going anywhere." Tony: "We're actually in a room with a green screen behind us, and they're throwing buckets of water on us." Epic surfing shot from astern. Slomo washing machine.Oh wow. My jaw literally dropped watching that. Drone footage of AkzoNobel sailng under FR0 and J2 (I think?) with no main, as two crew members up the mast repair the track (I'm assuming). Epic low-altitude shots with Southern Ocean waves heaping up between the drone and the boat. Sheerwaters or albatrosses (gotta get a field guide to identify those better) swooping right past the drone multiple times. Final shot of crew working on the mast, then pulling back and climbing to show AkzoNobel surfing alone through the Southern Ocean. That's, like, the shot of the race for me right there.SiFi sits at the nav station looking at a routing screen on the computer. His breath is visibly fogging due to the cold. "It looks like we're walking the line between speed and safety reasonably well." Slomo of his breath fogging. With low sun behind them as they stand on the stern, Charlie and SiFi talk about a problem with the main. "There's so much friction on it on the spreaders and shit it's probably not going anywhere." Nick talks about a couple of squall lines came through, up to 45 knots. And going onto the third reef the headboard of the mainsail isn't going onto lock. Mark: "Well, we've got 44 knots, and if you look this way there's a massive cloud, and the water's more white than blue." Charlie jokes about not saying "white squall". Slomo. Sam to Mark: "How is it being down here?" Mark: "It's everything you'd expect. Windy, cold, we've got 48 knots right now. Look upwind. It's crazy. Doing 30 knots of boatspeed. It's pretty crazy, but somehow everything's still in control." Slomo wake.Below, the engine is running. (Maybe they run the engine continuously in these conditions so the keel hydraulics stay powered up?) Kyle talks about how they're really in the Southern Ocean now. 50 knots earlier, and consistently 45. Waves are huge. "It's awesome downwind sailing. It's all on." Talks about how you enjoy it when you're on deck, driving and trimming. But coming below it's like you're in a washing machine. Peter: "Had an experience pretty similar in a Sydney-Hobart a couple of years ago." This is a little easier because they're going with it. Happy they got the front sail furled before it hit. Just have the J2 and a couple of reefs, blowing 45. Talks about how they're slowing down a bit in the big puffs. Stern cam shot from the deck in sun as they surf. Bow cam. Mast cam. Seas are gnarly and very confused.Witty, on the helm, gives a thumbs up and points forward as Scallywag sails fast on port gybe in windy conditions. Washing machine. Witty talks about the Southern Ocean. "Why do we all come down here?... I'm over the Southen Ocean." Witty, on the mainsheet: "Main on!" He takes spray in the face, turns to Konrad. "Beautiful Southern Ocean."Opens with a drone shot from behind of Vestas sailing on starboard gybe. A dark seabird (a shearwater, maybe?) is visible trailing the boat; the bird turns and flies RIGHT PAST THE DRONE. Overlapping audio of Sam asking SiFi, at the wheel, "Any second thoughts about sailing into this low?" We see Simon on the helm. "What's that Sam?" Stacey sits in the foreground chuckling. SiFi: "Second, third, fourth, fifth... Lots of thoughts... About how to get through it safely, and hopefully ahead." Below, Nick's face is mostly shadowed as he eats. "I guess I keep coming down here because this is where you're pushed the hardest, mentally and physically. And so far we're seeing the beignning of that with definitely the mental side pushing us hard, and the physical side is just about to start. Latest routing shows us doing about 1 million gybes between here and Melbourne. So we're going to try to figure out how we're going to make those as smooth as possible." On deck, Tom leans on the middle pedestal. "When it gets hard; hard, wet, and tired; it's hard, wet, and tired for all your mates on the other boats as well. Like Kyle Langford, the big seagull. He's gonna be tired. Pete Burling, Blair Tuke, Willy, Louis... everyoe's in the same boat. It's hard for everyone." Another shot of the shearwater buzzing the drone. Kyle: "It's hard for everyone. Sail fast. We're going to Australia. Heading home." He grins. "Heading home." Sifi is at the wheel as the boat barely moves in light wind. "Calm before the storm... Not really in the forecast, this light stuff." Below, Charlie tosses something round and blue in one hand, and says something I can't catch. "It's hever going to be easier than right now." (?) Wake as they sail fast under scary clouds. On deck, Charlie: "So far, so good." He grinds, gets a slap of water in the face. Mark talks about how they just put the second reef in, and have some water in the folds of the main, so they're trying to get it out. We see someone doing that with a boathook, getting hit by spray. Charlie talks about where the other boats are, geometry of trying to figure out where to aim to come out ahead of the other boats. "We've got more options up here. Whether they sneak around our bow remains to be seen." He talks about "separation anxiety", I assume because they're north of the other boats. "We'll know more in 12 hours I guess." Slomo washing machine, wake.Apocalyptic slomo shot of light through dark gray clouds as spray swirls around the wake. Looking forward from the stern, they're sailing under J2 (I think) on the outrigger and reefed main. Someone calls "main on", and Nicolai grinds on the aft pedestal. He turns to the camera as he's grinding. "Into the Southern Ocean. This is where the fun begins." In slomo, Álex grins at the camera makes a peace sign, a thumbs up, and gestures forweard. Slomo spray.Nicolai, on deck in his neoprene cowl in fairly light air, talks about how they're the most southern boat right now, and have just gybed. Fleet split into two groups; they're wth MAPFRE and Dongfeng. Below, Martine (in cornrows) bails out water. Jules and Nicho, at the nav station, look at routing software. Jules talks about being a bit disappointed in the latest sched, vs. MAPFRE and Dongfeng, Brunel. Nicho: "We coughed it up there last night." Separately, Nicho talks about how each of the boats separated; probably due to breeze. Shot of Simeon on the helm, scowling in his cold-weather cowl. Álex, in the cockpit, talks about how we are here, in the Southern Ocean, but it isn't normal conditions. "Like a pit stop before the next depression comes, with 35, 40 knots, straight to Melbourne." Nicolai talks about how variable the Southern Ocean is. "It's like a spring day in Denmark up north. So I'm enjoying it."In the cockpit (trimming the main, I suspect) Alberto talks about the next 24 hours as they head toward the depression. "At least for the moment it's still warm." Chuckles. Peter, sitting on the low side of the pit, talks about how conditions are going to change completely in the next day. Slightly lifting at the moment, later will gybe over, then on port will see "first bit of real Southern Ocean action for the leg. Yeah; it's gonna be pretty windy." Has his warm clothing downstairs. So far pretty nice this trip. Looking after the boat. Shot of someone working the bow in spray. Alberto grinding. Shifting the stack aft. Carlo working the clew of the headsail on a halyard. Abby repairing the pit winch. A rainbow ahead of them.Closeups: binnacle compass, hands on the wheel, easing the mainsheet. Marie, trimming the main, talks about the weather being warm, and no birds. It's sad they are too far north, not in the Southern Ocean. "Maybe tomorrow; we will see." Stu, on the helm. "Definitely not the Southern Ocean. We don't wear sunglasses in the Southern Ocean." (He laughs.) "This is far too nice." Black talks about the blue sky and being quiet warm. Wake shot. Below, at the nav station, Pascal talks about strategy with the approaching low, gybing during the night to get the good position, the good pressure. Difficulty of routing with the exclusion zone/ice gate. No way to get away and be safe. Tomorrow night, maybe gusting to 45 knots. Increasing wave state. He shows the routing software with the low moving through.Drone shot from ahead as AkzoNobel reaches on starboard, triple-heading. Below, Emily eats. She talks about how they're getting into the Southern Ocean. It was sunny and warm yesterday, but now that's changed. Justin getting dressed talks about the "Southern Ocean weather" coming up. Keeping in front of the front, in flat water, hopefully. But at some point "it's going to become a bit bumpy, and wet on deck." Emily talks about being nervous to see what it's going to be like. Drone shot of three sailors working on the bow, one on the bowsprit, rigging lines.Dockout. Simon crouches on the rail, saying goodbye to a young boy holding a Wisdom plushie; behind a younger child with a pacifier is held by a woman. Simon: "Be good!" As Vestas pulls away from the dock they all wave to each other. Below as they motor out to the start, Simon has put on his foulies and talks to Sam about the crew, how they combine youth, experience, lots of races, people in for the first time. "For the next leg the experience is good." Threading the line between sailing fast and breaking the boat. Sam: "Do you get nervous before these legs?" (I bet Sam is nervous.) Simon: "The hanging around the dock's the most stressful part for me. Saying goodbye to the family. But once you're out here there's not much time for nerves to be honest." In the cockpit as they sail before the start under main, Stacey talks about how yeah, a little nervous, going into the Southern Ocean with the forecast. Tony says it's his tenth time going down there. Shot of just after the start as the fleet sails on starboard tack. On the foredeck, Nick wrestles with a furled sail; it appears to be hung up in the rig above him. Nick, to the back of the boat: "Keep easing!... Are you easing?" He struggles to free the sail. Nick (under his breath): "Fuck it." To the cockpit: "Somebody come up and help me." Tom runs forward to help pull on the sail. Sam is right in the action as they wrestle with the sail. Nick: "Okay! It's good! Start hoisting!" Shot of Scallywag right on their stern, diving below them, TTToP and AkzoNobel further to leeward. Chuny is steering. Scallywag comes in beneath them. Shouting back and forth between the boats. Sam is RIGHT IN THE MIDDLE OF THE ACTION, leaning out to leeward, practically touching Scallywag. We see the OBR on Scallywag (Konrad Frost) filming Sam as Sam films him. Protests. Shouts from Vestas about the overtaking leeward vessel not having rights to luff above proper course. Later, they sail in less wind, the shore visible to port. TTToP and Scallywag are visible to leeward. Chuny, on the helm, appears to still be talking about the Scallywag incident. Chuny: "I saw him (gestures) luffing against US." Slomo shot of crew reefing the main. Sam: "Hey, Chuny. What happened at the start with Scallywag?" Chuny explains the rule, that Scallywag came in from behind and started luffing, and how it's not safe, it could have broken both boats, at the start of a leg like this. "I was angry... Because it's not safe." We see them putting in a second reef. Charlie, on the aft pedestal, grinding and talking to Sam. Subtitles (added by Sam), because he's barely understandable. "Ah you know everyone puts a lot of stock in the start. But it's kind of more how you finish."Nipper grinds while Annemieke calls trim. Witty explains that there was a problem with the water; too much chlorine caused a few crew to throw up. (Presumably he's kidding about seasickness.) He gestures at Tom, on the helm. "Clouty's just come on deck for the the first time since the start." Shot of another boat (Vestas?) on port on their weather quarter. Witty talks about hanging onto the leaders, should gain when the wind goes right. Two competitors ahead of them and to weather: Brunel and Dongfeng? Witty talks about how only one thing happens when you go in this direction: It goes nuclear. Below, Antonio eats while looking at the computer. He says to Konrad: "I managed to eat something properly. Gaining my sea legs. It's good." He puts on his foulies. Talks about the big transition coming in three hours' time. Grinding on deck. AkzoNobel crosses behind them. Parko talks about their preparation on shore. Witty, with AkzoNobel continuing on port behind them while they stay on starboard, talks about the good prep from their shore team for the current wind condition. Witty: "Being a little more proactive witih our decisions rather than reactive. I'm sure we'll get it wrong soon, but it seems to be working at the moment."Bleddyn is on the helm under gray skies and what appear to be light winds. He talks about the hype about what's going to happen in 2 days time. Light and tricky at the moment, with a bit of sea state. More breeze and big waves in 2 days. Martin talks about mixed feelings about being in the Southern Ocean. "Good and bad memories. Very tough, cold, and wet... The best advice is to stay dry and warm." Drone shots of TTToP sailing upwind on port tack with the J1 and full main. Onboard shot as they sail upwind of Vestas ahead and to leeward a few miles away. Shots of crew in the cockpit; Martin on the grinder, Bleddyn on the helm.Simeon walks along the side of the boat, shaking hands with shore crew standing on the dock. Motoring out, Brad talks about how funny it is to be talking to lots of people on Facebook, on shore, and then leaving and realizing it's just the 10 of you for the next few weeks." Nicho, standing on the stern, talks about leaving. "Not nervous. But quite motivated, to take this thing on. This is a big leg, a double-point leg... It's a high-wind, high-risk, high-speed leg." The start; other boats. Scallywag dives below them from astern. Footage of them going very slowly in light wind. Someone (Nicho?) talks about getting the FR0 stowed. Nicolai on the helm as they sail fast on port tack. Nicho talks about them getting stuck in a light patch and the boats inshore getting away from them. "Long, long way to go yet." Slomo grinding.Scallywag crew walks through the crowd during the dockout ceremony. Slomo of Fish hugging a young man/boy (son?) across the lifelines. Someone (António?) says goodbye to a toddler (son?) behind held by a woman. The boy holds a Wisdom plushie, inadvertently bopping the woman holding him (mom?) in the nose. Parko side-hugs a girl (daughter?). Witty at the helm takes them out from the dock with crowds visible behind them. Motoring out, Witty talks about double points on this leg. "We Scallywags need a podium on this leg into Melbourne, which would be nice." Talks about the wind on this leg. Standing by the mast as they motor out, Alex talks about being a bit nervous. It's his first Southern Ocean leg. "The race doesn't start here. It starts tonight." Parko, in the pit: "This is an important two miles out of 6,000. So it's just about sailing smart." We see the start, with all the other boats to leeward of them. Close action. Ben, on the bow, moving a sail.Dee, on the helm as they motor out, talks about going into the Southern Ocean, forecast for breeze. Francesca, trimming the main after the start, talks about the start. "We are close to the first, so that's perfect." Frederico talks while standing at the grinder (not sure what he's talking about). "But I start and it's all good now." MAPFRE is visible ahead and to leeward of them.Onboard before the start, Louis talks about being excited to be back in the race and looking forward to the Southern Ocean. Abby talks about how they've already got 30 knots, and they're all geared up for a night of slamming, banging in a big breeze. Footage of the start, racing around the buoys in close proximity to the other boats. Video has a glitch, with the video freezing at 1:00 while the sound continues, then sound drops out and we just see the frozen video frame for the last 48 seconds of the video.