On the stern, Bianca talks about helming the VO65. "I've had experience helming all sorts of boats. The biggest one I've helmed is about 220 feet. So this is a bit like a dinghy compared to that. You can really feel any wave hitting the side of the boat." She talks about the thrill of sending it down a big wave, needing to have trust in your fellow sailors. "It's just such an amazing feeling, the adrenaline's really rushing in you. I'm pretty sure the whole time I was steering I just had a massive grin from ear to ear. It's awsome." Martin: "It's important for evyerone to have a go. You can't go through the whole Southern Ocean without touching the helm. It was quite good to see Bianca; she did a good job. It was not easy for me to make the decision to let her drive as well. Might be a few more opportunities for her in the future." Below, Elodie says, "It's really important to try to involve everybody... for example, Bianca is working hard to learn to trim the mainsail every time I'm driving, so it's nice to give her the opportunity to drive a little bit too. It's important for the trimmers to understand how it feels when you are driving." Shot of Biana taking the wheel. and steering. Yeah, she's grinning. View from astern as she steers; rainbow on the horizon. She hands off the helm to Lucas, gives a big thumbs-up to the camera, and a fist-bump to Martin on the mainsheet. Cloud with crepuscular rays.Spreader cam view of foredeck with Scallywag sailing way off the wind. Witty at nav station, talks about having "grannied" (tacked around, presumably) twice instead of gybing, because of having heard that AkzoNobel broke their mast track while gybing. Wants to keep the boat together here and finish fast. Jokes about the ice limit as a fence the Volvo people built in the ocean. Talks about having a week along the ice gate. Spreader cam shot of the boat surfing. Witty: "I told Parko to sail at 95%, not 100. He's doing 29 knots, so he must have taken a knot off. He si a full-blown lunatic." Crash-cam view of Parko being blown off the wheel by a wave while surfing; jumping back on the wheel. Parko below: "Yeah, I drove for a little bit with no hands there. Didn't Chinese and we didn't tack, so it's okay." Bow cam of spray. Alex, below, talks about steering. "Yeah, it's pretty difficult. I probably only do a half an hour at a time... It's tricky now, because the waves are so big that you don't want to go down some of them. But sometimes you kind of have to go down them... It's a bit of an art to go fast, but not go down the wrong waves and break the boat." Parko talks about it taking energy, having just done a gybe, it saps up all the energy from your little naps, it's gone after you have one maneuver. Time to eat some food and recharge, and be ready for the next one when it comes.Martin gets dressed below. Dee says something to him. He goes on deck. Washing machine. View of him steering. Epic slomo shot of spray enveloping the stern from both sides. Slomo spray off bow. Martin gets major spray in the face.Carolijn, on deck in foulies, gives a thumbs up. Carolijn, below: "I'm lucky enough to be on watch with Stu Bannatyne, AKA 'Magic Stu'. When it's heavy weather downwind sailing, that's the man you want on the wheel. He's doing over-hours for the last couple of days. But the boat just smokes when he's driving." Shots of Stu on deck, slomo of Stu on the wheel. Stu, below, as Carolijn and SiFi take off the foulies in the background: "There's definitely a bit of technique to driving well in heavy airs, especially at night. It's mostly about trying to be accurate, small movements. A bit like trying to drive a car when you're fast. Just try to use very small movements of the wheel... At night might use stars if there's any around to help keep the boat going straight, otherwise it's just a bit of a feel for it, keeping a steady heel angle, and not being afraid to push the boat hard to keep it going fast." Shots of Stu on the wheel at night, slowmo of him being hit with spray at the wheel. Charles, below: "I wanted someone with experience going south. This guy did it eight times, the Volvo Ocean Race. He's probably one of the guys in the world who has raced more in the Southern Ocean. There aren't so much people have a lot of expeirence in this part of the world. I think it's because he spends hours and hours pushing the boat in eight Volvos, and this is the best school to learn in. In France we come from singlehanded sailing, we don't drive so much; we have autopilots, so we can go fast with the pilots but for sure we don't drive enough. This guy has made eight Volvos since he was a kid; probably one of the guys in the world to have much hour driving fast in big waves. That's why he's so strong." Slomo of Stu at the wheel.